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Atomic Robo RPG
by Stacey M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/04/2014 23:34:38
A good version of the Fate System. I especially appreciate the way the rules are illustrated with panels from the comic - pretty, but also really helpful.

This would be a fun game for any kind of "action science" adventure - perfect for anything along the lines of Star Trek, Fringe, or Dr Who.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Atomic Robo RPG
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Venture City Stories • A World of Adventure for Fate Core
by Vance R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/01/2014 22:39:16
I love fate. Since Core came out I have run and played in a few games. We ran a Kick-Ass Princess game; I won the tournament in a Street Fighter inspired game; Cthulhu was punched in the face by the Kaiju Klown killers; and Dracula was staked on the dance floor, under the disco ball. All great, but something was missing: superheroes.
I have been craving a good super game for a while. I liked Icons, hated M&M, and though I adore the system Savage World Supers never felt right. I wanted Fate Core Supers. Icons was close but was a bit unfated (if I can be allowed to totally make up a word). Fate Core, with Supers. It sounds simple and I thought I could make my own hack, now I don't have to.
Venture City is Fate with Supers. It is elegant and simple and Fate. I hate cliches, so I'll just say it doesn't remake the ham sandwich. It uses Fate as Fate is meant to be used and doesn't do anything fancy. It doesn't have to.
Venture City Stories is the kind of game that makes you feel stupid, because you didn't come up with it. It is exactly what it claims to be: Fate with superpowers. If you already know Fate and want to see the easiest way to do superpowers this is must buy, and at the price how can you pass it up.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Venture City Stories • A World of Adventure for Fate Core
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Fate Core System
by Dan E. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/01/2014 17:17:59
As a long-time gamer (starting around 1979 or so), there have been just a few games that really got me excited. When I switched from a level-based game to a skill one (D&D to Traveller), to a great universal game (GURPS) and now this. I am convinced this is the best RPG book out today. It''s very well written. Clear, yet entertaining. This is NOT a rules-lite game. It is, however, a rules-are-secondary game. The aspects are an awesome way to keep focused on the narrative. Instead of looking down your character sheet for what you can do, or examining the tactical map for options, you decide what you are going to do, and make it fit into the rules. I just love that. The rules are quite structured as a flexible framework, but within those rules, the sky is the limit. I also love that you can portray great stories in the rules, without the massive preparation required in typical number-heavy games. I am not so sure about the letting the players have so much say in the story and campaign design, but that is most likely my lack of experience. I can tell you that is is now the only game I will run, and what I look for first at cons. It's simply the next generation in RPG development.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Fate Core System
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Atomic Robo RPG
by Jay S. A. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 06/17/2014 21:10:10
Atomic Robo is probably the most impressive RPG I have ever read that works with a licensed IP. It manages to hit all three most important factors in licensed RPGs: it’s fun, the rules reflect the fiction of the setting, and it manages to make me interested in the comic. Likewise fans of the comic might find themselves interested in the game.

The Fate Core rules fits Atomic Robo like a glove, and the custom mechanics for this game enrich the basic Fate Core system while highlighting the strengths of the setting. It’s relatively easy to learn, and there are enough examples to facilitate the learning process.

GMs and players alike are given freedom to make pretty much any character they want, thanks to Weird Modes, and the Brainstorm and Invention rules makes certain that Action Science is still the key theme of the game.

There’s plenty that other games can learn from checking out how Atomic Robo manages to provide a lot of freedom of choice, while adding a structure for guided fun in a game. The mechanics are elegant and each rule exists to further the theme and activities of pulpy fun.

Atomic Robo is a great game for those new to the hobby, and those looking to get into Fate Core. Old hands at Fate will find plenty to like here as well as Brainstorming and Invention Rules can work in any setting that needs it.

Definitely a must buy for any RPG gamer looking for pulpy action-adventure fun.

---

If you're looking for a more in-depth coverage, check out my 6 part Let's Study articles for Atomic Robo over at my blog:
http://philgamer.wordpress.com/category/roleplaying-game-
s/atomic-robo/

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Atomic Robo RPG
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Atomic Robo RPG
by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 06/05/2014 07:00:09
Originally published at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2014/06/05/tabletop-review-atomic--
robo-rpg-fate-core-system/

My favorite comic book of all time is Justice League International, which probably dates me as an old fogie. Still comics that have blend a blwend of comedy and action remain my favorites. I loved Sam & Max, Excalibur, Scarlet Spider, the John Rogers penned Dungeons & Dragons and of course, anything by Carl Barks, Don Rosa and Floyd Gottfredson. Currently I would say the three best action-comedy comics on the market are Archer & Armstrong, Quantum & Woody and Atomic Robo. While the Valiant crew has been releasing free teasers for their upcoming Valiant Universe RPG, Atomic Robo RPG actually beat them to the punch with their comic book RPG release! Even though I am a big fan of Atomic Robo, and especially his nemesis Dr. Dinosaur, I tend to buy it in digital trade form rather than pay attention to any news or the like about the series. So I was caught off guard and pleasantly surprised when a review copy of Atomic Robo RPG showed up in my inbox. Now before we begin, if you haven’t read Atomic Robo, you really should. I will try to keep from comparing the game to the comic for newcomers sakes (and avoid spoiling them), but Comixology.com has a lot of digital issues of Atomic Robo for free, so either download those before continuing or boomark the Comixology link. FCBD 2009 and 2012 are my favorites of the freebies and rank up there with some of the best in the entire series. If you don’t at least crack a smile at those two, much less laugh at loud, then you have no soul. That’s all there is to it.

Atomic Robo RPG uses the Fate Core System, which is a pretty unique and well-designed system. Unfortunately, I’ve tried the new Mindjammer, Dresden Files RPG, Cthulhu in Space, Present Day Cthulhu and other titles/setting that have used Fate Core System, but I never really got into them. The only game that uses Fate that I’ve really liked was Spirit of the Century, buy my friends and I tend to use Basic Roleplaying or Amazing Adventures for my weird pulp style games, so it rarely sees use. Now that said, Atomic Robo RPG makes exceptionally good use of the Fate Core System. Modes, Aspects and even the die rolling mechanics seem tailored made for an action science somewhat comical RPG. Maybe I (or Fate) just needed the perfect setting to be tied to. After all, after reading the core Atomic Robo RPG rulebook, I can’t imagine this setting working better with any previous super hero or comic book style game, and this is coming from a pretty diehard zealot of TSR’s old FASERIP Marvel Super Heroes game and an equally big fan of Mayfair’s DC RPG. I think Fate and Robo just complement each other nicely and deliver a RPG that is somewhat rules light while being incredible expansive in the field of character customization.

Now, if you’ve never played a Fate game, then I need to warn you: you’re going to need some special dice. Now, as a tabletop gamer, we’re already have special dice. We have D4s, D8s, d10s, d12s, d20s and the crazy Dungeon Crawl Classics dice. However, Fate games don’t use those dice. They have their own special d6 variants and they are nearly twice the cost of the polyhedral dice set tabletop gamers usually use. Expect to pay about between ten and twenty bucks for a set of Fate dice, depending on what type you get or where to get them. This does mean that the dice will cost you more than the PDF version of Atomic Robo RPG and while I realize that might put some off you off from purchasing the game, I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention it to people new to Fate and also say that the purchase is worth it. Amazon.com has a wide selection for those willing to buy the game and the dice.

So let’s talk the basic mechanics for Fate dice. You grab your four dice (rare situations can change things). They will either come up +, – or blank. A – is a negative and a plus is a positive. Add the results together with the appropriate skill and there you go. So if I got a +, +, ,-, I would have an end result of 1 which I would then add to my skill rating of oh, let’s say Burglary, which is Fair/+2. I would then have a grand total of +3 for my result. I mean, Fate is not rocket science people (although you can have the skill of Rocket Science since you are an ACTION SCIENTIST!). This is about 85% of the mechanics right here, so don’t be expecting a game like Pathfinder or Shadowrun where you spend more time looking up rules and mechanics than actually role-playing. Now obviously there are other modifiers such as Stunts or Mega-Stunts which are essentially powers or skills that let your character do comic book type things. You also have aspects of your character’s personality which can be invoked to give dice a bump. There are also Fate points similar to Bennies from Savage Worlds but closer to the GM Intrusion system you’ll find in Numenera. The bottom line is that with some rare exceptions, that paragraph above is all you need to know how to PLAY Atomic Robo RPG. You can pretty much start playing now!

One thing I absolutely love about Atomic Robo RPG is the character creation system…or should I say TWO character creation systems. You have an easy streamlined no muss, no fuss version to help you churn out a character for less experienced or younger gamers, as well as those that just want to play a run of the mill action scientist. Both versions are a lot of fun and due to how open concepts, aspects and stunts are, you can make whatever character you’d like without being restrained by die rolls, or predetermined categories. One of my big problems with the Margaret Weis version of their Marvel Super Heroes RPG was how you couldn’t really make your own characters and the premade Marvel ones were far from accurate. Honestly, the character creation system for Atomic Robo RPG is so fun, I’d use it (and the full mechanics) for other super hero licenses as well. There’s no reason why you couldn’t.

Which of course brings me to my next point. Do you have to be familiar with Atomic Robo to use or enjoy Atomic Robo RPG? Definitely not. The system does a great job of explaining the world of Atomic Robo, not just with words and descriptions, but with panels and sometimes full pages from the comic. Yes, instead of original art by guys like Larry Elmore or Timothy Bradstreet (I’m old!), Atomic Robo RPGAtomic Robo. To comfortably play in it, but you’ll be treated to some great scenes from the comic and even have a bunch of spoilers on the first eight volumes of the comic. Of course, those free Comixology issues I mentioned at the beginning of the review will also help to familiarize yourself with the game. Between the two, by the time you are done reading the core rulebook, you’ll be enchanted by the world and mechanically equally.

For only twelve dollars, you’re getting a complete 300+ page core rulebook and an in-depth look at the Atomic Robo universe. For that price, you should definitely pick up the PDF version of the game, even if you’re only mildly familiar with Fate or Atomic Robo. Now I can’t say the same about the physical copy as it’s three times as much. That’s probably best left to people who really love Fate or Atomic Robo. Simply put, the Atomic Robo RPG is exceptionally well done. It does an amazing job of explaining everything and at no point does it ever get dull, dry or boring like a lot of core rulebooks. With this in hand, you’ll definitely be able to “Tell Stores the Atomic Robo Way” (Chapter Ten). Again, grab those free comics from Comixology and if this review or those comic have your interest in Atomic Robo RPG piqued at all, just throw money at Evil Hat via their website or DriveThruRPG.com and download this game already. You won’t regret it.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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Venture City Stories • A World of Adventure for Fate Core
by Tim H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/27/2014 08:08:36
Excellent add on to the FATE Core game, I bought it mostly as a way of seeing how FATE can be adapted for the superhero genre. I wasn't dissapointed, it showed how to use super powers well in the game, and the art work + sample adventure / characters are solid.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Venture City Stories • A World of Adventure for Fate Core
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Don't Rest Your Head
by Andrew P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/27/2014 21:47:18
Originally published at http://screenmonkey.blog.com/?p=43.
DRYH is a fascinating little indie game that really brings it's theme out with the mechanics of the system.  It's one of the first Indie games I ever bought, and remains one of the few I've actually had a chance to run.  The PDF is fairly short, being only 87 pages long, including the cover.  But they manage to pack a lot of game in there.

The art in the book is pretty decent, all black on white photo's of really people, very grainy and evocative of the setting.  That setting is the Mad City, which is a lot like our cities, turned up to ten and seen on an acid trip.  It's always night there, and you can find things that just could not exist in the real world, like a marketplace where you can buy and sell memories.  Or the Tacks man, an entity that will take you apart piece by piece, not just physically but also metaphorically.  Maybe this time he wants your ability to laugh, or the way you feel about music, and he can take it from you, a little at a time.

The game centers around the Awake, people who were once garden variety insomniacs who have been sleepless so long that now they no longer have a choice about being awake anymore, they've lost the ability to sleep voluntarily.  In exchange they've found their way into an impossible place that butts up against our world, and they've also found power that defies reason.

Mechanically the game is very simple.  You start with your Discipline dice pool, which is always three to start.  Any roll of 1,2 or 3 is a success.  You roll against the Director, who rolls a Pain pool based on what you are facing.  This pool can run from a single die up to over a dozen.  Seems like the player has a distinct disadvantage, but they also have two other pools that help out.  The first is Exhaustion, which they can add to any roll.  It starts out at zero, but in any scene you can voluntarily increase it once, even right before you roll.  Once you have an exhaustion die going though it sticks around.  Once you hit seven exhaustion in your pool you are going to crash, falling asleep and becoming a helpless victim.  There is also the Madness pool, and you can add up to 6 dice of Madness to any roll, and they do not stick around like exhaustion.

Another part of the die mechanics is that you also look at your highest die, in all pool.  That tells you which aspect dominates the action.  If it's Discipline, skill dominates and you have no downside to the roll.  Exhaustion dominating means that you taxed your resources and you add another exhaustion die to your pool.  If Madness dominates you give up a bit of control and things get more chaotic.  You have a number of responses available to you, either fight or flight.  If Madness is dominant you check off a response and act accordingly.  If you choose flight, you try to get away, huddle in a corner or generally flee the area if able. If you choose fight then you stick around and get aggressive, which may not be a good thing when you are outnumbered.  And finally, if the Directors Pain pool is dominant then things get a little worse for you.  Maybe reinforcements show up or a stairway gives out under you and you loose track of the person you were following.  All of these are independent of the success or failure of the roll, so you can succeed and still have it be a hollow victory if pain is dominant.

The awake also have talents, one exhaustion and one madness.  Exhaustion talents are things that normal people can do, but for some reason you excel at.  You might be a master gambler, an amazing shot or just so smooth you can talk your way out of trouble.  Madness talents on the other hand are things that are flat out impossible.  Teleportation, Mind Reading, Flight, all are on the table for Madness talents.  The thing is, to use either type of talent you have to roll the appropriate dice as part of your pool, and they get more effective as you increase the number of dice rolled.

Another thing to note in the system is the way they handle the typical character creation 20 questions thing.  In DRYH there are only five questions, but they define your character and what they are trying to do, as well as their past.  The questions are what's been keeping you awake. what just happened, whats on the surface, what lies beneath and what's your path.

The first is why you are even one of the Awake to begin with.  The second deals with what happened to push you over the edge into being awake.  What's on the surface shows the way people view you, and what lies beneath is the hidden aspect of your personality or past.  What's your path is your ultimate end goal, what you are trying to accomplish overall.  These are used by the Director to shape your own personal plot.  In most games these questions, if answered at all, would be going into back story and might come up once in a great while.  In DRYH, they are the central reason and motivation for everything you do.  The characters of this game are not necessarily going to be hunting for treasure or lost secrets, and their reasons for doing what they do should be much more personal and visceral than the typical adventurer in a fantasy or modern game.

This is one of the two indie games that I always mention to people who are looking for something a little out of the ordinary, and I highly recommend it.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Don't Rest Your Head
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Venture City Stories • A World of Adventure for Fate Core
by David M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/27/2014 05:48:35
Amazing artwork, world concept and layout, for a Pay What You Want product. All thanks to the Evil Hat's Patreon funding, this product made me decide to join it. While I might have done the super powers slightly differently they are another good example of a different approach from the Fate Core System Toolkit.

I like how the sample adventure is worked into the text, but the book gives you additional ideas as well. The only problem if it can be considered one is it is too short, but that is due to the nature of the funding. Hopefully Venture City might be returned to and expanded at a later date.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Venture City Stories • A World of Adventure for Fate Core
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Venture City Stories • A World of Adventure for Fate Core
by Paul M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/23/2014 04:10:00
So I've been a fan of the Fate system for a few months now, and have successfully ran/played in cyberpunk,steampunk, and fantasy using Fate. My group was starting to get into a slump after a less then stellar attempt at a scifi game. Then I saw Venture City Stories, and man the ideas started to flow. I don't think a product with such a small page count has inspired my gaming creativity so much. I hope the author releases more content in the future. Just sayin' , if you like the Fate system, Shadowrun, or gritty supers you should support the author and pick this up.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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Venture City Stories • A World of Adventure for Fate Core
by Sky C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/16/2014 16:37:22
A OUTSTANDING module from Evil Hat for your Fate Core collection....the artwork is very solid, some of the best that I have seen!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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Venture City Stories • A World of Adventure for Fate Core
by Allan B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/15/2014 10:18:24
Excellent first offering from Evil Hat for building up your Fate Core collection. I've read through the Venture City Stories and found it very well laid out to set up and run a story from Venture City. Really enjoyable Too!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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Venture City Stories • A World of Adventure for Fate Core
by Gustavo C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/15/2014 10:17:30
This is a short setting for FATE CORE, part of it's patreon project, around 30 pages long. It has inside some developed adventure hooks and some setting with hooks for your own and a lot of meat for developing it further. As for the feel of the setting, it's a lot like shadowrun, but replacing the magic and magic races with low to medium power (more on this ahead) superheores and you have the right feel. It's ciberpunk heroes. The powers are implemented by unbalanced stunts, and as per Fate design they are narrative in nature. They can pack quite a punch, but only if you concentrate on a single group of tighltly related powers. If you diversify you get a little more variety, but weaker. In other words, you can create powerfull heroes, but not ALL ARROUND ALL POWERFULL ALL IMPOSSIBLE SUPER PEOPLE. And that's good, because otherwise the ciberpunk setting wouldn't click with the superheores. Each power also has drawbacks and consequences for missuse built in, so it's great to work with them and against them.

Also of note, besides the replayability because of the way the setting still exists after the main adventure presented, is that the mechanics it implements for powers are excellent for other kind of powers in other settings. I've already seen talks about using it for supernatural powers in a mistyc setting. The Fate community Already knows this, you can break some parts of FATE and still have a playable game that still feels like FATE.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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Fate Accelerated Edition
by Christopher D C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/13/2014 15:05:39
FATE Accelerated Edition, or FAE, is a good introduction to Evil Hat's FATE game engine. While it's different enough from FATE Core to be a stand-alone RPG in its own right, FATE Accelerated is similar enough to its parent so that once you feel you're ready to tackle the more advanced mechanics of FATE Core, you should be able to make the transition with little effort.

FAE is extremely liberating from other RPGs, in that there are no Character Points to spend, no endless lists of skills, powers, talents, traits, or extras to choose from, no defects/disadvantages/flaws to burden your hero or heroine with just for the sake of balancing out a character's point totals. Character creation is simple and easy: you choose a "high concept" (a phrase that sums up your character's role in the game setting), a "trouble" (another phrase that identifies a primary weakness of the character), and one to three other "aspects" (additional concepts that help round out the character's background). You then set six "approach ratings," which represent how your character deals with various challenges (Cleverly, Sneakily, Forcefully, and so on). If desired, you can choose anywhere from one to three "stunts" (things your character can do extremely well). In a matter of minutes, you have a fully defined character with a general suite of abilities which have been established by his or her approach ratings, high concept, trouble, and other aspects. All without the numbers crunch you have to deal with from other RPG systems.

The task resolution system follows the general path of "roll-high-and-hit-a-Target-Number," only in FAE, you roll four Fudge/Fate dice and apply the result to whatever approach rating you're using for a particular task. Having an appropriate stunt can improve your chance of success, as can the expenditure of Fate Points. If you're trying to accomplish something that fits your character's high concept (or other aspects), you can spend a Fate Point, which either gives you a bonus to your roll or allows you to roll again (this second option is best if you initial roll was very poor). You gain Fate Points during the game by accepting "compels," which is when your character's adversaries find a way to use your trouble (or even your other aspects) against you; if you give in to your weaknesses, you're rewarded with a Fate Point, which is a great way to encourage good roleplaying.

Combat is quick and easy to run. Instead of worrying about how much damage this weapon does against that sort of armor, everything is resolved with a single pair of attack/defense rolls; the greater the attacker's margin of success (or "shifts"), the more damage done to the target. A target can stave off defeat by checking off stress boxes or accepting "consequences" (penalties which give the attacker additional weaknesses to exploit); when the target can take no more stress or consequences, he or she is at the mercy of their attacker. A neat option allows a would-be victim to escape this fate by voluntarily conceding the fight before the coup-de-grace is actually delivered, allowing them to exit the scene with at least a modicum of dignity--and they also get a Fate Point for doing so.

Overall, the system is very free-form, with all kinds of room for innovation by both the players and the gamemaster. This is arguably the most cooperative RPG system ever created: everyone works together to weave an exciting narrative, using aspects, troubles, and the like to take an adventure in all kinds of unexpected and enjoyable directions. This can be a bit daunting for gamers who are used to more rigid systems, but once you get into the spirit of the thing, you'll find yourself having more fun than you could have imagined.

FATE Accelerated Edition is a terrific game, and definitely worth checking out. The list price for the published edition is $5.00; I recommend paying something in that neighborhood for the electronic edition, as it's well worth it!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Fate Accelerated Edition
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Venture City Stories • A World of Adventure for Fate Core
by Joseph F. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/13/2014 13:29:10
Really solid offering -- if you've been wanting to run a gritty supers campaign in Fate Core, this is a great place to start looking. The power creation system holds fairly closely to "stock" Fate Core, so there's not a bunch of fiddly subsystem details to try to remember. The setting is evocative, with numerous opportunities for creating tension within the team, or between the team and the world.

I think the setting was referred to as "superpunk," though maybe "metapunk" would be better. As in many dark future settings, the odds are stacked against you; sure, you may have super-speed and X-ray vision, but the corps all have supers working for *them*, too, and you're a deniable asset -- get in over your head, and there's *nobody* coming to rescue you.

It's amazing how much awesome is packed into 30 pages, and that indeed is another virtue -- you can read the whole setting book and (especially if you like the adventure that comes in it) be ready to roll in an hour. You really can't go wrong with this one.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Venture City Stories • A World of Adventure for Fate Core
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Venture City Stories • A World of Adventure for Fate Core
by Brett R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/11/2014 23:53:23
(Note: I've not yet run anything with Venture City, so this review is based of of reading it only, though I have done a few games that relied on the system presented in Wild Blue)

A great (thin, but fat for the price) toolkit for supers and an original setting that provides plenty of flavor. Venture City provides a different approach to powers than the Wild Blue setting (by the same author and in Fate Worlds Vol 1) while retaining the non-crunchy approach (powers are a collection of Stunts with some flavor tweaks to allow for special effects, drawbacks/limitations, and/or Collateral Damage for additional effectiveness).

There are no arbitrary limitations on how many powers you can have or what mechanics are appropriate (though it does suggest that no one character have more than two distinct powersets, each powerset can cover multiple effects). Compared to Wild Blue this is distinctly more flexible and feels more "supers".

A 30-page supplement can only go into so much depth, but here's what you get:
* A setting that provides for morally-gray hero/villain face-offs and normal people trying to get by.
* A system to build powersets that relies on Fate Core fundamentals with only a tiny tick up in complexity.
* Some sample pre-built powersets (5 basic templates that offer suggestions on variations)
* a pre-written adventure in the setting, including NPC supers.

Each of these is covered enough to pick up and run (the adventure, being Fate, is more a basic plot and the desires of various NPCs than a linear set of encounters), but those looking for exhaustive answers or a book of power stunts to pick from will be disappointed.

The setting itself is modern-day, and covers the superhero power origin, but each individual hero is allowed a lot of leeway in determining how they unlocked their powers. It has a distinctly cyberpunk, dystopian feel (minus the cyber). Aside from the existence of corporate-managed supers, fans of the TV show Arrow will find many similarities in the setting feel.

On the whole, the product is well-worth the suggested price for those looking for a system to run Supers in Fate or those looking for a gritty supers setting that is easy to inspire stories from, and you get both in Venture City.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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