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Adventure Quarterly #5 (PFRPG)
by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/19/2014 08:11:59
Originally published at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2014/03/19/tabletop-review-adventu-
re-quarterly-issue-5-pathfinder/

Although the days of high quality monthly tabletop RPG magazine have long since passed, we do seem to be having a nice resurgence of quarterly magazines with top notch content…even if the magazines aren’t actually coming out every three months. We’ve got The Unspeakable Oath and Gygax Magazine for example, but TUO hasn’t come out since August and Gygax #4 is a few weeks late. Hell, it’s been almost a year since The Savage Insider had its last issue.

Which of course brings me to Adventure Quarterly #5, the product we are reviewing today. It too has had almost a year since it’s last issue (technically nine months), which is a bit surprising because Rite Publishing is perhaps the best company in regards to Pathfinder licensed products in terms of getting things out on time. Pathways, RP’s monthly free magazine, is as close to clockwork as this industry gets. Plus it’s the closest thing we have to Dungeon magazine anymore, as it is nothing but adventures. So was it worth the wait? Well, yes and no.

First, let’s talk my big problem with the piece, and that’s pricing. As much as I have enjoyed previous issues of AQ, the thing is too overpriced, especially compared to other quarterly gaming magazines. The cost of just the PDF version of a single issue of AQ is the same cost as a physical AND digital two pack of The Unspeakable Oath, which may not be 100% adventures, but does tend to be a superior product, writing-wise. Same too with Gygax Magazine. It is also of the highest quality and it’s only five bucks for the digital version and only $8.95 for the physical. So why the higher price tag for AQ? Well, a few reasons. The first is that it is Pathfinder and Pathfinder products do tend to be a bit higher priced than other RPGs. The second is that AQ is in full colour where the others I have mentioned are mostly in black and white. Finally, at least in my experience in this industry, it’s more expensive to pay someone to write an adventure than it is to write an article about some facet of gaming. While all of these things help to explain part of why Adventure Quarterly is price so much higher than other quarterly tabletop mags, it doesn’t explain all of it. Honestly, the fact I could buy digital copies of both TUO and Gygax for the cost of just one issue of AQ is enough to make me lean towards not recommending the magazine on just a price basis. However if you only play Pathfinder, the fact that this is your only Dungeon equivalent means you are pretty much stuck with this and the high cost each issue comes with.

Of course, cost doesn’t matter much if something is of high quality. You should, theoretically, get what you pay for after all. So if the adventures in AQ #5 were amazing, that could have offset the price tag issues I have with the magazine. Let’s take a look at each one.

Our first adventure is The Ruins Perilous Level 3 – The Sensodrome. This is a continuation from previous AQ issues where the goal was to release one level of the dungeon per issue. This is a great idea on paper, but it doesn’t work quite well in reality. After all, the high cost of the magazine, tracking down back issues (you’re better off going through DriveThruRPG.com for those) and the long time between issues makes The Rune Perilous series not very conductive for actual play. If this was a monthly magazine it would be one thing, but it’s quite another to have to wait a minimum of three months per dungeon crawl level. The PCs are essentially stuck. No, this adventure would be better off collected as one piece and sold separately, or in a monthly magazine. Now this is not the fault of the adventure itself, but it doesn’t prevent most gamers from getting any use out of it.

Besides these issues, The Sensodrome is simply a generic dungeon crawl experience. It favors roll-playing over role-playing and is little more than a hack and slash affair. While this is not necessarily a bad thing, it’s not necessarily an experience a lot of gamers want. Granted, Pathfinder or D&D gamers are more apt to enjoy this sort of thing than say, World of Darkness or Call of Cthulhu players, but it does still mean that the audience for a piece like this is limited by the nature of the adventure style and doubly or even triply so by the release date of each level.

Now all of these negatives aside, The Sensodrome is a finely crafted sixteen room dungeon crawl designed for 3rd Level characters. It could use a bit of an introduction which would allow DMs to run this as a one-shot one level piece instead of waiting to combine all the Ruins Perlious levels, but that is true about any dungeon released in stages. You will also need several other books to run the wandering monster table as monsters are pulled from all sorts of other locations like The Tome of Horrors Complete, The Book of Monster Templates and so on, but the core adventure has all the stats you need to play the adventure without any additional purchases, which is a big plus. There are some fun and challenging encounters for PCs on this level and it’s pretty free with the experience so characters should level up AT LEAST once in this piece. I enjoyed the layout, the monsters and the obvious creativity in this one. It’s just too bad there are some many other negatives weighing this down. That said, I am really looking forward to Rite Publishing putting together a collected Ruins Perilous piece (if it ever gets finished) as that will be a top notch dungeon when all is said and done.

Our second adventure in this collection is The Legacy of the Fishermage, which is for four to five 9th Level characters or a party of six 8th Level characters. This is a really fun and long (for a magazine based release) adventure. It’s also a bit silly. I’ll admit the “Salmon of Wisdom” that is highlighted in the adventure made me think of “The Fur-Bearing Trout” from Earthworm Jim. I should also point out that this is almost the polar opposite from The Sensodrome, which is nice as you get two well-designed pieces that together highlight how diverse Pathfinder adventures can be.

The adventures revolves around a sage’s repeated misadventures in trying to catch the Salmon of Wisdom and his bad luck with apprentices. This time the sage is long dead, but the salmon has two new hunters in the form of an Ogre and a disgruntled changeling. The PCs become involves after saving a dwarven priest and learning about the legend (there are several other hooks to get the characters into the adventure). There are a lot of riddles to solve, locations to visit, monsters to vanquish and of course, a magic fish with the wisdom of the universe to find. I also really liked the subtle bits of humour in this adventure. The climactic encounter with the Salmon of Wisdom is quite amusing, for example. The end prize is a nice bonus to which ever character(s) get it and this is really one of the better Pathfinder adventures I’ve seen published in 2014 so far. It might not be a seller by itself, but it is the crown jewel of this issue.

The third adventure in Adventure Quarterly, Issue 5 is Paradox and it’s for 18th Level characters. It’s very combat intensive and it is designed to be a Campaign Ending Event. I’m really not a fan of some random adventure being the way a campaign ends. Something like that should really be cooked up by the DM to tie up loose ends and provide closure. Instead this adventure hits on all sorts of things that tend to be red flags, warning a DM and player that there is a bad adventure ahoy. It has time travel (which tends to do far more harm than good to a game unless you are playing a game specifically about time travel), a magical McGuffin that threatens all of reality, a really work story hook that sort of railroads the players into the adventure even if they don’t find it interesting, and monsters that seem to be thrown in simply for the sake of combat than any real story cohesion. It’s a pretty weak adventure in all respects, but then, writing any adventure for characters of this level is a pretty daunting task and while I found this to be very lackluster and trite with robotic lions armed with chainguns and the like, I’m sure someone will get a kick out of this. Unfortunately I’m the one reviewing it and this adventure was supersaturated with all of my personal Pathfinder pet peeves. How is that for alliteration?

Our fourth and final adventure is actually a short encounter segment entitled, Sleep, Interrupted. This is a fun really short piece that can be inserted into any adventure, published or homebrew, and it happens when the PCs are settling down for a much needed sleep. It’s a spooky little piece involving ghost orcs who died in the cavern the PCs are resting in. Sleep, Interrupted is nothing fancy but it’s a good battle and potentially provides some fine treasure. The encounter is scalable between CR 6 and 9 and so there is some flexibility to be had. Nice job for a short piece.

So those are our four adventure pieces, but wait –there’s more! We have a two and a half page article by the lord and master of Rite Publishing himself, Steven Russell. Like the first piece in AQ#5 this article, entitled, “Wide-Open Sandboxing Part II,” is a continuation from the previous issue. However unlike The Runes Perilous, this article works as a stand-alone. It’s basically advice on how to come up with memorable NPCs quickly. Steven suggested cribbing from various trusted sources like lists of names, stat a block similar to what you are looking for instead of designing it out yourself, and taking personalities from existing characters and modifying them slightly instead of doing copious amounts of work like pages of background text for a character LARP style. The advice is sound, especially if you are an inexperienced DM or adventure designer as it really does speed the process up. Long-time DMs may turn up their nose at the advice because they want to do all the work themselves, even for a character who might not even show up in the adventure based on the choices the PCs make. You know what? That’s okay. Steven isn’t presenting this advice as a way you SHOULD do things, but as an option to make your life easier. The article is worth reading even if you have no intention of taking it to heart.

So all in all, Adventure Quarterly isn’t too bad. There is one adventure I’d give a thumb’s up to, one I’d give a thumb’s down to, a decent encounter, an adventure segment that is well designed but falters by being a quarterly installment piece and an interesting article. While the price point is far too exorbitant for what you get, especially compared to other quarterly gaming magazines, devout Pathfinder fans will find one truly solid adventure in the mix and that might be worth the price tag. Everyone else though might as well hold out for the next issue or a price drop, if they get it at all. Adventure Quarterly has a lot of potential and it’s nicely done, but in the end, you just aren’t getting your money’s worth – at least with this issue.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Adventure Quarterly #5 (PFRPG)
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Frozen Wind (PFRPG)
by Carl C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/14/2014 18:18:07
Small scenario in a tight situation, Interesting situation, but more ways to actually interact with the plot and background would have been nice. Yes, you can make those up, but scenario tips are very valuable. As it is, it is a little too straightforward, and investigating the situation isn't very rewarding. Its more do or die. The individual goals add an extra dimension, but the motivation to do them straight away is pretty weak - either you would do them before the main scenario begins (which there is scant support for) or after the scenario ends (when most of them become much easier to achieve. Overall, not very impressed. It it is a solid horror scenario, but the subgenre is action rather than investigation or intruige.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Frozen Wind (PFRPG)
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Pathways #35 (PFRPG)
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/13/2014 18:13:37
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of Rite free Pathways-e-zine is 40 pages long, 1 page front cover, 1 page ToC, 9 pages of advertisement and 1 page of SRD, leaving us with 28 pages of content, so let's take a look!



After David Paul's editorial gives us a run-down of the contents of this issue and the options contained herein, we are introduced to Steven D. Russell's template for this issue, the Chine creature at CR +3. Essentially, these beings hail from worlds where science (and intelligent constructs) have started assimilating everything. Studded with a massive hardness of 20 and fast healing - which is a bit odd, since usually construct creatures (apart from animated objects) get a DR - possibly even DR/-, but rather rarely hardness. Oh well, it's most an issue of nomenclature and does not impede functionality. Each Chine creature also gets an array of special abilities - a total of 16 ranging from blindsight to buzz saws and plasma tools are provided, adding more customization options. Worse, they come with electrical charges and wounds incurred from them can slowly turn you into a chine creature! On the downside, while they are highly resistant to energy, they lose all spellcasting prowess and supernatural aptitude and actually are rather susceptible to magic. The sample creature would be a mi-go at CR 9 - okay build. The artwork is okay, but nothing to write home about.



Liz Winters talks about using Realmswork and mastering in an interesting article and, as always, Raging Swan Press' Creighton Broadhurst has a new creature as well - one surprisingly far-out for a Raging Swan-character, and one better off for it: We are introduced to Klar, the GNOLL SAMURAI (Ronin) at CR 5. Yeah. Good Gnoll Samurai. Awesome.



Recently, some of the cool unique races by Rite have seen some support in Pathways. This time, we get favored class options for the half elf/half ogre-magi Wyrd: A total of 17 alternate racial traits for the wyrd are provided. Unfortunately, I'm honestly not sold on all of them - take greater spell resistance, which replaces one of their late level slas with SR 11+char level; Not being able to lower this one may be rather...interesting, but since the main sources of healing no longer need to be spells or SLAs, I think it may end up a bit on the strong side. On the other hand, better withdrawing (not provoking AoOs from two squares rather than one) makes for an interesting idea. As a nice option, the favored class options also cover gladiator, hellion, luckbringer, malefactor, Vanguard and War Master as well as the UC-classes - neat to see the support!



Steven D. Russell also has a new bard archetype for us, the Grifter - a con-man/spin-doctor who may conceal information from others, veil enchantments into casual conversation etc. - Grifter can cause even speak with dead result in lies! A smart, cool archetype that investigative players will loathe when used on an NPC... quite some story-telling potential here.



This issue's interview is all about Purple Duck Games, as Mark Gedak, mastermind of Purple Duck Games and 4 Winds Fantasy Gaming explains some recent cool projects they have on their hands as well as providing some insights into their Porphyra-setting - be sure to check this interview out!



Finally, we get some reviews of 5-star files by Mark K. and yours truly.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are good, though not as tight as some other Pathways -issues. I noticed a couple of obvious glitches that could have been prevented. Layout adheres to RuP's 2-column full color standard and the pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.



Over all, this installment of the Pathways e-zine is a solid offering with some nice love for the cool Wyrd-race, a neat template and a nice archetype - my favorite this time around, though, would be Creighton's good gnoll samurai - far-out and cool, the character is sure to make an appearance in my game, also thanks to the nice full color illustration! This e-zine is free and hence, well worth your download, even if it's not 100% perfect - in the end, I'll settle on a final verdict of 4 stars with still a definite recommendation to download this asap.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Pathways #35 (PFRPG)
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Lords of Gossamer & Shadow (Diceless)
by Jay S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/07/2014 12:12:46
This is an excellent book and RPG.

The setting material is well thought out and provides for exciting campaign ideas. The setting fixes some of the issues I had with the original Amber material from a roleplaying perspective by making all worlds equally real and opening up PCs to be anyone from anywhere.

I'd have liked to see more variety in powers; they're addressing that with supplements, and the powers given in the core rules are sufficient, but expect to need to use the examples provided to build your own versions of powers to match the wide range of character concepts your players will generate.

Overall, an excellent game and one I'm having a lot of fun with already.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Lords of Gossamer & Shadow (Diceless)
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Addendum: Blessings & Curses (Diceless)
by Jay S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/07/2014 12:06:01
This supplement to Lords of Gossamer and Shadow adds in a new power: Blessings & Curses. It uses a flexible system for constructing a blessing or curse that's similar to how artifacts and creatures are built using the core rules. You pick the severity of a blessing or curse, the effect, how long it'll last, how hard it is to dispel, etc, and pay the costs.

In this case the costs come from the points invested into the power itself. So to cast some truly world-class blessings and curses, you'd need to invest advancement points into the power over time to boost your pool of available points.

I like the concept, although the character point investment needed makes this a core character concept power, not an add-on.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Addendum: Blessings & Curses (Diceless)
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101 Not So Simple Monster Templates (PFRPG)
by Seth C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/06/2014 15:56:38
A great value for its price. This book has a lot of useful templates, most of which are pretty easy to apply. It is a great way to change up creatures to keep the players guessing or make an old monster seem new. I liked how not all of the templates were geared towards just making monsters tougher. Some, such as the blind seer, create a way to add new story elements. Not all of the templates increase CR. Some decrease it, which is a great way to let you use more powerful creatures at lower levels.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
101 Not So Simple Monster Templates (PFRPG)
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Lords of Gossamer & Shadow (Diceless)
by joe b. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/02/2014 00:43:57
This RPG is awesome! I've tried a lot of games and have always scurried back to D&D 3.5 or Pathfinder. Lords of Gossamer and Shadow is an amazing game that needs more exposure. I never played Amber and wouldn't be able to compare, but because of LoGS, I wish I had known about Amber in its hay day. The diceless rule set will be a hard sell for some that will think the game is completely arbitrary. If you/they can get over that mental hurtle, you'll find a RPG full of infinite possibilities that won't become a headache because of having the crunch rules and mechanisms.

Lords of Gossamer and Shadow is definitely a RPG that will flourish in play-by-post forums. I don't know how well I would a game like this in person, but I have been running a fairly interesting pbp group on RPGpost.com and I think I have 3 players that are just as hooked as I am on this game.

I look forward to supplementary books for the system, but I just don't know how they could improve it.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Lords of Gossamer & Shadow (Diceless)
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Addendum: Blessings & Curses (Diceless)
by Erik H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/23/2014 15:41:54
I was very happy with this book. It's short, but adds something to the game that some players seem to need in a game like this: bits you can fiddle with as you go.

It can be somewhat expensive to use this new power. It's in the middle to high cost range to start with, giving you a set cost just to be able to use the power and also included is an initial points pool for buying the actual blessings and curses. You can increase the pool later as you wish. Should this turn out to be a power very suitable to the character, there's no inherent limit to how far you advance it. More points in the pool equates to more (and more powerful) blessings and curses in play at the same time.

As with almost every other power, this is an excellent tool to have but there is some inherent potential for it to pull you in new directions and complicate the life of your character. So in short it's both useful and interesting, which is exactly what you want out of a product like this.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Addendum: Blessings & Curses (Diceless)
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In The Company of Dragons Playtest (PFRPG)
by Jeff A. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/22/2014 16:16:04
Ummm.... No.

I LOVE the intro and various other flavor text parts, but overall no.

First off, you're not playing a Dragon... you're playing a quasi-dragon, secondly you end up finishing normal progression as about an adult dragon, without many of the (real) dragons' basic abilities... so you end up being significantly less powerful than you would be if you just played a Savage Species version of a class/level system.

Further, if you want to GET various abilities, you have to pay for them with your every 4th level feats. So then you end up being ALMOST as powerful as you should be, but then you've turned into a cookie-cutter version, and you're STILL only ALMOST as powerful.

Bear in mind, I'm not talking about min-maxing here, I'm actually talking about class balance... in the end you really aren't going to be much of a match for equal-play PC's, or if you are, you end up being utterly "vanilla" to do so...

Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
In The Company of Dragons Playtest (PFRPG)
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Publisher Reply:
I want to thank Jeff Anderson for posting a review of our free playtest draft, as it is often hard to get reviews for free products. I would encourage him to join the playtest so his voice can be heard in improving the final draft of this product. I will however have to point out a factual error in his review. \"a Savage Species version of a class/level system\" Pathfinder does not use the ECL system to which Jeff is refering, because it was a broken system, so we were required to use a paragon racial class levels and archetypes. Steven D. Russell Rite Publishing
The Demolished Ones (Fate)
by Todd C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/22/2014 10:42:43
I read all kinds of RPG scenarios whether they apply to my current game or not. This one REALLY caught my interest. As usual, I tried to convince one of my players that we should step away from our current InterfaceZero (SavageWorlds Cyberpunk) game to try this out. As usual, he kinda said no.

Few months later, I decide a virtual reality 'prison' scenario seems to be in order. It occurs to me that this might fit.

Waking up on the stone floor in different 'bodies' in the midst of a murder really excited my players. I let them still use their character stats basically but a session later they realize they are in a virtual reality and having a blast with The City!

WARNING!!! The free preview has spoilers so don't print it off and give it to a player. Better to just spring it on them. ;-)

AWESOME work! I am trying Fate Core RPG on another group and have enjoyed it so far but converting this one to Savage Worlds and using for an unrelated campaign as worked swimmingly.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Demolished Ones (Fate)
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Pieces of Fate: Drop Bears & Ursanauts (FATE)
by Trev W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/20/2014 18:51:47
This really got my attention, I just had to review it. It did not disappoint.

Within it has the stats for the 'Drop Bears' and how to place them into games. The bears seem impressive with swiping special abilities and on the defense, the ability to make opponents miss their first attack, so stunned are they by the might ursanauts, and some other tricks I won't ruin here.

The drop bears are designed to confound and annoy players, and there are a few jokes inside. It should also be noted that 'drop bears' normally refers to attack koalas in Australia that leap down from eucalyptus above. Here it has been re-appropriated to mean something far larger that also has laser and body armor tech.

This has in such a short space a lot of ideas for throwing/deploying them into fantasy, sci fi, pulp or horror games. Although for horror they are acknowledged to be more for comic relief.

5/5 So good. Great job Bill Collins.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Pieces of Fate: Drop Bears & Ursanauts (FATE)
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Publisher Reply:
thanks for taking the time to do a review!
Addendum: Blessings & Curses (Diceless)
by Trev W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/20/2014 17:42:21
Addendum: Blessings and Curses is a small project by one author, a Jason Durall. The art is very good, the leviathan woman on page 4 made me wish she took up more space. Those that are a fan of anime horror will like page 3.

It details that in the Gossamer worlds setting curses and blessings can be placed on a subject. This is not the d100 tables of D&D curses, this is different, more precise and structured. Buying into the ability gives the user a point pool by which to inflict blessings and curses (and let's be honest, curses are far more appealing, if only to say "a curse upon your house!").

The how to of letting loose curses is explained and then the severity is bought by spending points. This isn't the end, multiple targets can be hit and there are other parts to the rules. I will say this though, you can even curse an entire bloodline, and that is very cool.

Then what I was looking for was found, examples of mild and major curses, but this section is a bit brief. The only thing I felt this product lacked was a short essay or lengthy section on the myths and many types of curses from history and religions, so as to really get the creatives juices of the reader flowing.

4 out of 5. Quite good, but not flawless and needs one more section for thoroughness. Well worth the low price though.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Addendum: Blessings & Curses (Diceless)
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Pieces of Fate: Drop Bears & Ursanauts (FATE)
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 02/13/2014 07:05:49
Bizarre yet somehow weirdly plausible... what if bears were even bigger, fiercer and more intelligent than they are? Smart enough to organise a civilisation, use weapons, even attack those pesky humans. Maybe these are alien bears, or perhaps those grizzlies paid just too much attention to what hunters and rangers were getting up to.

So here are all the details, under the FATE ruleset, for you to run these intelligent bears - Ursanauts, perhaps, coming from far away in giant spaceships. Is it a hunting trip, to chase humans for sport? Or is it a scientific mission, to tag and study them? Or a miliary one, to take over some bear-friendly real estate?

Are you going to stop a drop bear and ask him his business? Or will you be too busy running away?

The stats and various stunts available for bears work well and are consistent with the postulated extension from what real bears can do. While the core idea is to introduce them into a contemporary game as alien invaders, several suggestions are made as to how to make use of them in other genres.

The only thing is, I've always been led to believe that drop bears hide up trees (from which, of course) they drop onto you. These ones are just too darn big to hide up trees! Otherwise, they have loads of potential for mayhem.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Pieces of Fate: Drop Bears & Ursanauts (FATE)
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Publisher Reply:
I wanted to thank Megan Robertson for taking the time to do a review. Steve Russell Rite Publishing
Pathways #34 (PFRPG)
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 02/10/2014 02:46:59
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of Rite Publishing's Free E-zine Pathways is 38 pages long, 1 page front cover, 11 pages of advertisement, 1 page ToC, 1 page SRD, leaving us with 24 pages of content, so elt's take a look!



We kick this off with an almost sadistic teaser by editor Dave Paul - his first adventure is coming and what he's telling so far, it's gonna be...unconventional. One word: Ettincommunicationbreakdown. Want to know more,? Read for yourself!



Steven D. Russell, master of templates and overlord of Rite Publishing has a template for us - this time at CR +3, the envious creature: These beings may not only change shape, counter-scry, and get feats, skills etc. of the form they turned into, they also, spiteful to the last, may deny their target's what they covet by self-destructing in a terrible blast. Jogund, a CR 8 envious troll, makes for this installment's sample creature.



Next up, Liz Winters shows us a behind the curtain look at some of the fellows responsible for the boon to gaming that is Hero Lab for many people, before Raging Swan Press' Creighton Broadhurst introduces us to a villain most foul - Myvainir Sehiatier, a skeletal champion necromancer/cleric/mystic theurge that clocks in at a nasty CR of 10. That's not all, though - Creighton also introduces us to Yoth Yagoth (love the nomenclature here), an advanced gnoll sorceror with a blue dragon's bloodline at CR 7. Awesome!



Steven D. Russell also has a useful system-neutral list of 100 epithets for us -for non-native speakers and designers as well - see if you could correctly define each one of them - I know I could and it makes for a fun little game (while also potentially broadening your vocabulary...)



Now this issue's interview is with Greg LaRose, head of Amora Game: From total inexperience, he has lifted his small company to ever increasing heights, resulting in recently even scoring my best verdict of 5 stars + seal of approval with Prepare for War: Basic Training Manual. Beyond being a fun read, it should be noted that Amora Game has recently started a kickstarter for Liber Influxus Communis, a book of classes where some of the most talented class-designers contribute. Check it out if you haven't already!



Next up would be support-article to what still remains my favorite construct-class for PFRPG, the Ironborn: This time, we get ability-suits for alchemically-treated ironborn that are resilient to bombs (and get more),one engineered for eidolon-connection, one that has a firearm included in its body, one that is particularly suitable for cavaliers, one that is excellent at hunting down foes and a design that is none - whether by ill or good omen, you are touched by something divine and hence may twist fortune to reflect the divine agenda behind your being. There would also be the hybrid design, which is particularly nice for Magi -two thumbs up and my favorite article this installment - I love it when old supplements are not abandoned and instead developed further.



We conclude this issue, as always, with reviews, this time one by Brian B. and the rest by yours truly.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, I didn't notice any all too glaring issues. Layout adheres to RiP's nice 2-column full-color standard and the pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.



This is a great installment of Pathways, with nice fodder for DMs with cool characters, a deadly template and finally, also some great expansions for a neat race - at the price of 0 bucks, so what's not to like? Download it, read it, think about dropping abuck or two for Amora Game's KS and enjoy yet another neat month of cool offerings by Rite Publishing and friends- final verdict? 5 stars + seal of approval.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Pathways #34 (PFRPG)
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In The Company of Fey: A 1st-20th level Player Character Racial Class (PFRPG)
by Nick S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/06/2014 16:45:35
I wasn't really sure to make of the In The Company of Fey. On the one hand it was well written, but took the fey in a bit of a different direction then I was hoping for. I will say this, Rite's Publishing vision of the fey and the rules they have crafted for them are good ones, but again they are a little different from what you might expect. These fey are a bit more like the old school mythical faeries that their more high adventure counter parts you might find in games like Magic the Gathering. Rites make some interesting design choices such as making them medium sized creatures who can turn into smaller sprites, which you'll either love or hate.

If you can get into the right mindset it seems like there is a lot of fun to be had with the fey presented here and many design choices seem well thought out to let the fey fit comfortably into almost any pathfinder game, but if you were looking for the Pathfinder equivalent of something like Hack Master's Pixie-Fairies than this product isn't for you.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
In The Company of Fey:  A 1st-20th level Player Character Racial Class (PFRPG)
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