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Hellfrost Land of Fire Core Setting
by Claus A. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/14/2013 06:59:22
It's Savage World..
We got it for the magic rules not because of the setting

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Hellfrost Land of Fire Core Setting
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Hellfrost Region Guide #1: Sacred Places
by JK R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/16/2013 09:29:06
A 12-page booklet describing magical places within the world of Hellfrost, this could equally well serve as a source for any fantasy setting where magic can imbue the landscape. The first 4 pages or so are taken up a general discussion of sacred places and the incorporeal, otherworldly spirits that imbue them with power. These are not creatures to be killed, but sentient magical essences that can grant some kind of boon to visitors, usualy in return for a sacrifice.

This is followed by a description of thirteen such places, the nature of their spirits, and the powers they grant. Most are generally low-level, and there is a wide variety of different kinds, including divination, fertility, healing, and combat spells. They are all atmospheric, and should work in most settings. Finally, there is a description of the minor god of brewing, and of an undead monster.

This won't be of immense use if you're only interested in dungeon-style adventures, but otherwise it should be useful in most fantasy games. The rules for the sites and their powers are fairly minimal, and so should be easy to adapt if you happen to use a different system. High recommended if you're looking for a bit of magical flavour to make your world seem truly mythic.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Hellfrost Region Guide #1: Sacred Places
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Leagues of Adventure #01: Dreaming Spires
by Alan K. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/25/2013 21:57:48
Dreaming Spires is an adventure for Triple Ace Games' Leagues of Adventure RPG.

The adventure is set in late 19th century England, and has a structure and feel not unlike that of the first Robert Downy Jr. Sherlock Holmes movie. The Globetrotters are asked by an aristocratic family to seek out their missing son who was expelled from his studies at Cambridge, and in the process stumble on a sinister plot that could shake the foundations of the empire!

The adventure is loosely organized into "episodes", and the episodes into scenes. The episodes are roughly in order of the way they are likely to occur, but there is some flexibility built in; players can easily surge ahead in the plot and skip earlier scenes, and perhaps double back to ones that they might have missed.

The adventure incorporates a lot of actual historical locations and a few historical figures. The author weaves these details into the backstory so they become somewhat important. She certainly did her research here (or is an expert on the history of Cambridge); there were many places where I wondered if she was just creating fanciful details but found out they were real, like the Cambride Apostles and Russian Cosmosism. This makes for a flavorful and realistic-feeling backdrop to the adventure.

Of course, this is written for steampunk game and you will find the requisite wierd science inventions in there.

Though a strong adventure, I do think it is best for experienced GMs. There are places that I had to improvise to keep things on track and conceive where certain important NPCs would be at certain times where the adventure is not explicit; some sort of dramatis personae, NPC overview, and/or relationship map would have been helpful to this end. Also, though the plans and techniques of the NPCs are well detailed, for the most part, descriptions of their physical appearance was lacking, a detail my players quizzed me about and had to make up on the spot.

Overall, it was a fun adventure to run in the action-investigation steampunk mold, and I can't wait to see the next installment in the series!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Leagues of Adventure #01: Dreaming Spires
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Leagues of Adventure - Core Rules
by Blake C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/14/2012 11:57:31
Leagues of Adventures is a very rule-light, story-driven game. While there are some limitations to the system, overall it's very fun to run campaigns in this. Depsite it's simple approach, it is still able to handle a lot of complexity.

Organisation (8/10): The book for the most part has everything laid out in order. It could use a decent index, but I used the .pdf version, and was able to search through for anything I needed. There's niice tables for the longer portions too, such as skills and feats, to use as quick references.

Character Creation (9/10): This is a point-buy system, so can be a bit overwhelming for new players, or players not used to point-buy. The learning curve is not steep, however, and most were able to create characters without assistance.You purchase your primary abilities which filter down to secondary abilities; Initiative, for instance, combine Dexterity and Intelligence. There's no rounding down, or complex maths, it's just simple addition. After abilities are determined, skills are purchased. Skills are fairly broad based, each containing several more focused areas, called Specialisations. You can opt to improve the skill as a whole, or, for a reduced cost, you can purchase specialisations, which improve only that focus area. Feats are purchasable as well, and there's nothing too weird here, each feat has pre-requisites, and costs a set amount of points. Character creation can take as little as 5 minutes once the system is learned.

World Creation (5/10): While the system itself seems able to handle any genre, the setting in the book is very limited. If you want to go outside of it's boundaries for any reason, you're going to have to make house rules for things. We decided that we wanted computers to exist, and none of the skills really seemed to fit it, so we had to make a new Computer skill. Still, the setting that's provided is fairly well fleshed out.

Gameplay (8/10): Both I and my players enjoyed trying this setting out. There are very few interruptions in play to need to look something up (these normally happened in combat when they happened at all), which is a real relief after having played things like DnD (3.5, PF and 4e) which are overly pedantic in their rules at times. Success or failure depends on rolling successes. Unlike other games though, any type of die may be used. Even numbers are successes; odd numbers are failures. This makes for easy check resolution and, let's face it, everyone likes rolling a lot of dice sometimes. Thankfully though, you don't have to actually tally up the result, just check for evens and odds. In a rather welcome and unexpected addition, the system has what it terms chance dice. These give the players an ability to possibly accomplish things that they could not normally do. If a player had to make, for example, a climbing check, with a difficulty of 5 (needing 5 successes), and his rank was only 3, he normally would not be able to make the check (rolling 5 successes on 3 dice is slightly problematic). However, using chance dice, he has the possibility of success. A player may add two dice to his pool at the expense of the difficulty going up by one, and he may use a maximum of 10 extra dice. Therefore, in the example, the player could roll up to 13 dice, and the difficulty would rise to 10. The odds are still against him, but now it's possible.

Art (7/10): I generally don't care about art when I'm judging a system, but since I'm reviewing the book, I'll include it. The art fits the setting, and while it's a bit amateurish in places, it doesn't detract from the book at all. It is true steampunk art, and not as you see in many places, drawn by people who have no real idea what steampunk is other than Victorian.

Overall (8/10): While it's clear that the book is done at a smaller publisher, and the polish isn't quite all there, it's a solid game, a good system, and I'll definately be keeping my eye open for more Ubiquity books.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Leagues of Adventure - Core Rules
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Savage Worlds All for One: Regime Diabolique
by Simon H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/13/2012 22:01:01
First, let me say the rating of three is probably a little unfair. I'm giving that to the book based upon it strictly as a standalone product with the buyer only having the Savage World Core rules to go with it. By that guideline it has both pros and cons and should be considered adequate. Taken in a different light as part of a the greater Savage Worlds setting it has potential but more on that later.

Based on the three rating here's how I view it.

The Good: An underused period with plenty of potential the book does a pretty decent job of providing a GM or player with everything they need to go on a three musketeers style adventure. The setting is very fleshed out and the book provides options for varying it between more historical to an even higher degree of magic. The magic system is interesting and (I'd argue) appropriate and the different styles of sword fighting are a very appropriate addition, perhaps even the best implementation I've seen for a swashbuckling type setting. Artwork in the book is both of good quality and could be useful in game. The map of Paris and the provinces of France in the back is a very nice addition which I'd argue is generally useful for anyone running a musketeer or pre-modern setting French game.

The bad: Unfortunaty I can't say it really comes together well enough. The book does an EXCELLENT job of giving you potential plot seeds and has one very nice central twist (which I'm not going to spoil) but it doesn't even have a bare framework of starting a campaign despite saying all your characters must be musketeers. I'm not going to disparage their excellent work by saying that this needed a start to finish plot point campaign but at least something to get the players started and give the GM something to build on would be nice, especially if you're going to railroad them somewhat on the character building front.
This goes hand in hand with all the world building and details, both historical and semi historical. I like having them and I know there are GM's out there that would prefer this method to taking up space with official adventures but I would have suggested cutting down on some of the details and providing at least one or two adventures just to show how it could be done and provide more of an example of how to do certain types of musketeer adventures.
The book could have used some more proof reading, none of the mistakes were 'what the #$%!' level but there were a couple of confusing ones and at least one that qualified as pretty bad, replacing the whole opening paragraph describing the Rosicrucians with something else entierly.

Conclusion: All in all none of this were deal breakers but I feel I have to put the book at a 3/5 because of them rather then something higher.

Now, having said all that, taken as something larger this book has a LOT more potential and could really shine for some GM's and groups. The dark Savage Worlds outlook has always promoted interconnectivity and using this book in something like that is really promonent. I can't remember who (Mark Vassal?) suggested that an interconnected campaign against the forces of evil over time through various Savage World settings is a very real and cool possibility and this setting would fit in well. More then that, looking at some of the characters and groups you could well use the things from this book to determine heroes and villians of the whole overarcing story.

Even if that isn't your cup of tea both the magic system and the fencing schools could be adapted and included into other settings. Maybe it's just me but I think Iron Dynasties is screaming for a GM to lift the fencing schools and their included rules out of this book and put them into that world, you could almost do it with just a change of names. I'm not entierly sold on some of the rules and the complexity they can add to combat BUT that's just me and I can still see plenty of potential there. The magic sytem isn't quite so great but it provides an interesting alternate option for magic settings the power point rules don't always work in. If your players want a higher powered Solomon Kane magic system of perhaps something different for the Weird Wars setting, I could see this working with a few tweaks. A word of warning to GM's though, a stricter penalty of some sort for failure might be in order, I kept having visions of my players trying to cast spells of escape time after time even though they were bound and gagged.

So to sum up: an adequate product by itself, some good ideas marred by some glaring gaps and failures in editing. Taken together with other Savage World books it might be something more and maybe even qualify as a must have for certain GM's and play styles.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Savage Worlds All for One: Regime Diabolique
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Daring Tales of Adventure #01 - To End All Wars & Chaos on Crete
by Matthew B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/02/2012 19:11:53
All the pages are blank. Well, okay not all, just the content we paid for; as the cover and credit pages show up fine.

Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
Daring Tales of Adventure #01 - To End All Wars & Chaos on Crete
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Publisher Reply:
There shouldn't be any problems viewing it on a PC via Adobe Acrobat (the platform is was made for). We can't guarantee it'll work on other platforms, as it wasn't put together for them. If the PC viewing doesn't work, please drop me a line (wiggy@tripleacegames.com) and we'll happily sort you out with a replacement file.
Daring Tales of Adventure #01 - To End All Wars & Chaos on Crete
by Steven s. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/22/2012 13:12:52
Love the idea of this product, but can't view it. Can you please give us a non JavaScript version that is viewable on mobile devices like an iPad?

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Leagues of Adventure - Core Rules
by Robert O. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 07/08/2012 01:04:09
Leagues of Adventure takes players into world of amazing adventures in quasi historic world of XIX / XX century. It mixes themes of Verne and May, Indiana Jones and Sherlock Holmes, Haggard and Lovecraft, steampunk and western, horror and pulp...

This game has a very bog chance to become best new RPG of 2012.

Is a must!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Leagues of Adventure - Core Rules
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Leagues of Adventure - Core Rules
by erik f. t. t. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 07/06/2012 12:17:00
I really do like the Ubiquity RPG system. I think it accomplishes much of what Savage Worlds can accomplish without a lot of the system weight that get's attached. Lets call Ubiquity my favorite system that I've yet to play.

Leagues of Adventure is the latest game to use the Ubiquity RPG Engine. Notice I said "game", not sourcebook. Unlike Savage Worlds, which has a core rules set and source books that feed off that, games that use the Ubiquity system are just that - stand alone games.

That can be both good and bad. It's great if you want to pick up a single set of rules and run with it all in one package. Not so great if you are getting the same core rules restated for each genre that you pick up. It is, admittedly, a small quibble, as the Ubiquity core rules are much lighter than those that constitute Savage Worlds.

Leagues of Adventures covers the late Victorian Age. It is not an era I have much experience with, either in fiction or gaming - Sherlock Holmes is about as close as I usually come. Thankfully, LoA comes with extensive write ups of time lines, important historical personalities and world leaders that enable even a Victorian Novice like myself enough pieces to drop in front of the players to make it sound legit. Very well done and extremely well researched. I enjoyed this section as both a gamer and a former history major ;)

Of course, as fun as the historical Victorian is, Leagues of Adventure takes things just a little bit further:

In Leagues of Adventure the boundaries of science are being pushed far beyond their historical limits. While hardly commonplace, mole machines, airships, and even time-traveling machines do exist. Some are already in the hands of governments and Leagues, while others remain the personal property of their slightly mad inventors.

Therein lies the hook of LoA - it's Jules Verne and than some. Our history and just a tad more. Victorian with pulp. I like it.

Would I run this before Hollow Earth Expedition? I don't know? I'm definitely more grounded personally in the Pulp Era of the 30's, but League of Adventures certainly gives the tools to allow one to bridge the gap.

Did I mention the extensive bookmarking of the PDF? Very well done.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Leagues of Adventure - Core Rules
by Jay S. A. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 06/21/2012 19:58:40
I've always held a lot of respect for Paul "Wiggy" Wade-Williams' work, and Leagues of Adventure is him at the top of his game. As far as core books go, this is one of the most complete in terms of usefulness and inspirations for a GM to run a game in this exciting era of gaming.

The Steampunk genre is hitting a high point in its popularity as of late, but while a lot of the stuff out there is content to handwave a lot of stuff in exchange for mere style over substance, Leagues of Adventure shows off what a healthy serving of research can do to make a game feel grounded and believable while still retaining the fancy aesthetic.

For fans of the Steampunk genre, or anyone with an interest in heroics, I definitely recommend Leagues of Adventure.

---

This is an excerpt from the full review on my blog. If you'd like to read the entire review, kindly visit:

http://philgamer.wordpress.com/2012/06/22/review-leagues-
-of-adventure-core-rules-by-triple-ace-games/

Thanks!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Tabletop Heroes: Age of Piracy - Pirates
by Walter J. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/04/2012 01:20:39
I was very pleased with this PDF. I bought it mostly for the figures but I was also hoping to get some use out of the Savage World stats. I got the figures for my Pirates on the Spanish Main game and was happy to find that was what the Savage World's stats were for. It might have been nice to mention that somewhere for the product, at least a "Can be used with PotSM" - though the PotSM license is probably lost in some legal no man's land.

The first five wild card NPCs are all male ship Captains. They are of different ranks of power and each has a different sized ship running from a 1 masted sloop up to a 5 masted man o' war. The different Captains seem to match their ships in power. In the character section Captain Edward Deepbeard and Captain Jan de Booth have the same image but the actual stand up minis are different.

The next five wild cards are female NPCs. Two of them have the command edges to be ship Captains, Mary Blood and Madeline Garnier, and also have ships. One of the others, Sally Blackheart, has a 1 masted ship and boating but not any command edges. Jane Read is meant to be a supporting character and is a lookout, though she has a lot of edges for a supporting character. The last female wild card is a rich rogue.

The next section has what they call crew members but they are very well developed to be just crew members. I'm planning on using them as henchman, extras with a wild die. There are ten of these extras.

The last section has 5 animal pets. They are all interesting from the GM point of view because you can get an encounter or two out of them. From the table top figure point of few a few more pirates would have been better but from the story point of few you will get some use out of them and they are likely to add something to the plot line.

The PDF has a cover page, a credit page, eight pages of NPC description, and three pages of figures to be printed out.. The art on the trifold figures is good and there is one figure for each NPC on two pages. On the Last page there are 18 figures that can be changed to any image so you can make up to 18 of the same figure or mix 'n and match different figures..

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Tabletop Heroes: Age of Piracy - Pirates
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Hellfrost Region Guide #28: Blackstone Barony
by William W. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/08/2012 22:24:33
Details and history of a drab, dark barony ruled by an oppressive regent, with a possible change of leadership looming in the future. This supplement is for Savage Worlds, but is practically systemless, and could be used as inspiration for any fantasy RPG. The writing is excellent, but there is no art.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Hellfrost Region Guide #28: Blackstone Barony
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Hellfrost Region Guide #4: Orcmark
by Christopher L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/28/2012 08:33:45
Pros -

Expanded information for the region of Orcmark.
More personal info on the nasty Orc leader Nagrat
More locations / story threads and ideas
Army compositions of the four massive Orc armies
and my personal favorite - is the why come here information. I think this addition to the entire Hellfrost setting is what is so appealing to these products. Not only do the region guides give additional info but they give you and your adventurers a legitimate reason to want to travel to these places.

Cons -
only that I wish there was more!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Hellfrost Region Guide #4: Orcmark
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All for One: Régime Diabolique
by Thomas B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 08/18/2011 19:36:43
WHAT WORKS: I dig the magick system, as I already have a fondness for that type of "construct your spell" system, and a very good amount of game information is provided. I had no prior experience with Ubiquity, but it feels familiar enough to systems I have had experience with that it doesn't seem like it would be hard to pick up at all. As with Hellfrost, Triple Ace Games has a TON of support for the setting in the form of adventures and microsupplements. The concept is just cool...I like fighting monsters in more than just a "kill 'em all and take their stuff" capacity, and the whole "Everyone's a Musketeer" thing helps you bypass that "why are your characters on the same side, again?" thing that comes up in some games.

WHAT DOESN'T WORK: Given the setting, as I'm not even a remedial student of French history, a closer look at the setting would have been great. I mean, there's enough there to run with, but it's kinda spread around from the beginning of the book to the end. Also, you can never go wrong with including an adventure generator...just saying.

CONCLUSION: I'm way more enthusiastic about Savage Worlds stuff, so if I had to pick a Triple Ace franchise and run with it, it would certainly be Hellfrost. That said, Ubiquity seems like a really easy system to pick up, which is always a plus. I actually like the Magick system better than I do Savage Worlds powers. It wouldn't take much encouragement to get me digging into the microsupplements, especially stuff like Guide to Expanded Terrors and Creatures of Sin. If you don't mind learning a new system and the idea of Three Musketeers vs Demons, Vampires and Witches appeals to you, then I heartily give this a strong recommendation.

For my full review, please visit: http://mostunreadblogever.blogspot.com/2011/08/tommys-take-o-
n-all-for-one-regime.html

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
All for One: Régime Diabolique
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Hellfrost: Gazetteer
by Thomas B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 08/17/2011 19:07:12
WHAT WORKS: The writing takes care not linger too long on any one place and painstakingly drive it into the ground. There are some great plot seeds if Hellfrost isn't hampered with a metaplot (I haven't read any of the adventures yet, and there is no plot point campaign). This book runs fairly light on the art, which means there's a lot of setting material inside the pages.

WHAT DOESN'T WORK: I like extra crunchy bits, so I'm not quite as "Wowed" with the Gazetteer as I am the Player's Guide and the Bestiary, but that's just me. I caught an odd typo or two, like "Grey" and "Gray" being used for the same location within a sentence of each other.

CONCLUSION: While Hellfrost has a very central premise, the Gazetteer does a really nice job of establishing that the evil in the realm is not monolithic, meaning that there is more to do than just fight one bad guy and his minions. The Gazetteer gives you enough information to run with most places that might interest you, and they have a ton of microsupplements to "zoom in" on a given location if that interests you. In fact, if the setting only had the three books I just reviewed, it would still be a strong, fleshed out setting...but Triple Ace Games has released an amazing amount of support for it since its release. For me, I would place it near Midnight and Ravenloft among RPG fantasy settings (and I mean that as an extreme compliment). If, like me, you're a Savage who passed over Hellfrost in the past, you should probably rectify that.

http://mostunreadblogever.blogspot.com/2011/08/tommys-ta-
ke-on-hellfrost-gazetteer.html

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Hellfrost: Gazetteer
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