DriveThruRPG.com
Close
New Account
 
  
 
 
You will lose your chance to get the free product of the week.
One-click unsubscribe later if you don't enjoy the newsletter.
Close
Log In
 
 Forgot password?
 

     or     Log In with your Facebook Account
Browse









Back
Other comments left for this publisher:
Deadlands Noir: The Old Absinthe House Blues
by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/21/2013 09:02:37
Originally posted at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2013/01/21/deadlands-noir-the-old--
absinthe-house-blues-savage-worlds/

Earlier this month, I reviewed the Deadlands Noir campaign setting and absolutely fell in love with it, to the point where I’m STILL kicking myself for not taking part in its original Kickstarter campaign. Since then, Pinnacle Entertainment has released the first adventure for the setting, entitled The Old Absinthe House Blues, and I knew I had to see if it was just as good. As the adventure was originally a free Kickstarter stretch goal to backers of a certain dollar amount, I’ll admit to being a bit shocked at the price tag on this adventure. With a page count of only thirty-two pages, it’s hard to justify the $9.99 price tag for this adventure, especially when it’s a) almost a fifth the size of Deadlands Noir but roughly half the cost b) just a PDF and c) crazy expensive compared to adventures like the Shadowrun Missions series, which is the same size, full colour and only $3.99 per adventure. The good news is that, while The Old Absinthe House Blues is pretty expensive compared to similarly sized adventures from other systems, it’s a really fun adventure that works as an excellent introduction to not only the Deadlands Noir campaign setting, but the Savage Worlds. Pinnacle does have you over a barrel right here.

If you’ve read Deadlands Noir (or my review of it), then you know to expect two things. The first is that you’ll need a copy of Savage Worlds in order to play this adventure, as that is the rules system it uses. The other is that the adventure is set in and around New Orleans in the 1930s. Eventually, we’ll see other locals for Deadlands Noir, so just hang in there if The Big Easy isn’t your preference.

If you haven’t picked up Deadlands Noir, you really should grab that before getting The Old Absinthe House Blues. Again, you will need copies of Deadlands Reloaded and Savage Worlds for rules and mechanics, and the aforementioned Deadlands Noir for setting information. So that’s three whole books just to play The Old Absinthe House Blues, which is a bit of a sorespot to me, but seeing as I only get PDFs of RPGs these days, it’s not like having all these books to play an adventure is going to break my back or take up a lot of space. Still, couple the need to purchase three books on top of a ten dollar adventure and the cost is going to add up quickly for newcomers, perhaps even to the point where it drives them away. So if you’re gaming on a tight budget, The Old Absinthe House Blues might not be where you want to begin with this system.

The player characters are either gumshoes by trades or roped into the role for whatever reason. They’ve been hired by the bartender of The Old Absinthe House to find the joint’s missing torch singer, one Ms. Delilah Starr. Seems she played her regular gig Friday night, but never showed up to work on Saturday. Sounds like a simple missing person’s fetch quest, right? Well it’s not. The adventure throws everything but the kitchen sink at the PCs, including an unrequited would-be amour, an evil oil company (is there any other kind?),a bunch of petty thugs, some voodoo magic for good measure and an unwholesome beast out to turn the PC’s insides into their outsides. Characters will be going everywhere from New Orleans proper to a bayou swamp inhabited with spooky things in spooky locations. The Old Absinthe House Blues is a pretty turbulent affair, and there’s a good chance at least one player character will bite it through the progression of the adventure. It’s a fairly creepy adventure that will have you wondering who is the bigger evil in the adventure – man or monster – and it blends supernatural horror and two fisted pulp drama together in a way that it is hard to imagine one without the other. By the time all is said and done, you’ll have been given a taste of everything Deadlands Noir has to offer, and you’ll want to come back for more.

One thing I should mention is that The Old Absinthe House Blues is pretty different from regular Deadlands and Deadlands Reloaded adventures that I have played or red through in the past. This is not an adventure fraught with fast paced actions or shoot ‘em ups. Sure, there are times where combat is the answer (perhaps the only answer in fact), but The Old Absinthe House Blues has more in common with Call of Cthulhu adventures than the Weird West Deadlands is typically known for. There’s a lot of legwork, research, hobnobbing and persuading here. There is at least one point where the PCs will encounter an alien horror that defies understanding, and their best option is for flight over fight. Honestly, with a little bit of tweaking, you could actually make The Old Absinthe House Blues work as a 1920s/30s Call of Cthulhu affair, and it would still work wonderfully. I bring this up for two reasons. The first is this means The Old Absinthe House Blues is a wonderful way to introduce people to Savage Worlds or Deadlands who primarily play games like Chill, Call of Cthulhu, Trail of Cthulhu or Gumshoe. There’s a strong crossover appeal, and it will help with the learning curve of the new system, as Deadlands has some very unique quirks that people tend to either really love or really hate, like the deck and chips mechanics. The other is that the slow pace of this adventure coupled with the more cerebral gameplay might be a turn-off to others, especially those who want a more traditional Deadlands adventure or something hack and slash based. Personally, I loved this adventure and found it to be exactly the sort I love to run/play, but then, my favorite games are Call of Cthulhu, Shadowrun and Vampire: The Masquerade, so I’m not your typical Deadlands player.

The Old Absinthe House Blues should take between one and three sessions of a few hours, depending on the players progress. It’s a fairly linear adventure, but there is room for deviation and places where the authors suggest throwing in some of those Savage Tale side stories from the Deadland Noir core rulebook. It’s full of memorable characters and does a good job of combining the core theme of Deadlands proper with the grit and locales of a Noir setting. The adventure also sports some excellent art, some helpful handouts for players and some reference maps for the Marshall/Keeper/DM/GM/Whatever to use. The Old Absinthe House Blues is a solid affair from beginning to end, and it’s a great companion piece to the core Deadlands Noir campaign setting. The worst thing I can say about the adventure is that it’s priced a bit too high compared to its contemporaries, but even then you’ll get your money’s worth out of The Old Absinthe House Blues and then some. At this point, my biggest concern is whether or not Pinnacle can keep a string of high quality Deadlands Noir releases coming, and the speed at which they do it. After all, there’s so much potential in this setting and we’ve only got a single city locked down so far. So far the Deadlands Noir setting is two for two in terms of quality releases and I can’t wait to see what’s next.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Deadlands Noir: The Old Absinthe House Blues
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Deadlands Noir
by Roger L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/18/2013 01:43:14
http://www.teilzeithelden.de
-----------------------------

Erscheinungsbild
Das Erscheinungsbild des nur 145 Seiten starken Bandes präsentiert sich durchweg gut. Dem Setting getreu ist die Farbgestaltung in einem hellen Grau gehalten, dass durch den sparsamen Einsatz kräftiger Farbtöne akzentuiert wird. Es unterstreicht damit die triste Atmosphäre des Settings ohne dabei langweilig zu wirken. Die Schriftart und der Kontrast zum Hintergrund sind ordentlich gewählt, und der Inhalt ist sehr gut lesbar. Nur in den Seitenleisten leidet die Lesbarkeit aufgrund der Darstellung als Filmstreifen manchmal ein wenig, wirklich unlesbar wird dadurch aber nichts. Das Artwork wurde übrigens von Cheyenne Wright erstellt, der Deadlands Fans sicherlich ein Begriff ist. Die Illustrationen fügen sich in das allgemeine Thema ein und vermitteln dem Betrachter eine düstere, feindselige Welt, in der Hoffnungslosigkeit die vorherrschende Emotion ist. Insgesamt ist das Erscheinungsbild unheimlich gut gelungen. Es gab keinerlei offensichtliche Tippfehler oder grafische Entgleisungen. Die verwendeten Grafiken wirken durchgängig sehr stimmig, passen gut zueinander und harmonieren sehr gut mit dem Gesamtlayout. Es macht richtig Spaß, sich mit einem so schönen Settingband zu beschäftigen.

Inhalt

Der Band ist wie bei vielen Savage Worlds Settings üblich in einen Bereich für Spieler und einen für den Spielleiter gegliedert. Der Spielerteil beginnt mit einer kurz gehaltenen Übersicht der Ereignisse, die in Deadlands von der uns bekannten Geschichte abweichen. Danach folgt die Charaktererschaffung welche den grundsätzlichen Charaktererschaffungsregeln von Savage Worlds entspricht. Als Settingregel erhalten alle Charaktere erstmal den Nachteil Arm, was die Grundstimmung des Settings sehr schön unterstreicht, wenn den Charakteren buchstäblich das Geld durch die Finger rinnt. Neu im Spiel ist die Fähigkeit Vorführen (engl. Perform), welche ähnlich wie Glücksspiel, als abstrakte Einkommensquelle in Form von Auftritten in den zahlreichen Bars und Nachtclubs funktioniert. Zusätzlich wurden einige sinnvolle Vor- bzw. Nachteile ins Spiel integriert die sich insbesondere dem Noir-Aspekt des Spiels widmen. Beispielsweise ist das Spielen eines korrupten Ermittlers oder eines allzu vertrauensseligen Zeitgenossen nun auch durch Nachteile abgedeckt und diese können zum Erspielen von Bennies verwendet werden. Die zur Verfügung stehenden, neuen Vorteile sind mittlerweile Standarderweiterungen, lediglich die berufsbezogenen Vorteile setzen interessante Akzente. Zusätzlich dazu haben auch einige Deadlands-typische Vor- bzw. Nachteile den Weg ins Regelwerk gefunden. Ein kleiner Abschnitt über die Verwendung der mystischen Hintergründe aus Deadlands Reloaded erweitert das Kapitel sinnvoll und klärt mögliche offene Fragen. Die Ausrüstungsliste wartet mit keinen großartigen Überraschungen auf, die wichtigsten Gegenstände sind in der Tabelle dokumentiert, die verrückten Apparate der Patenwissenschaftler unterstreichen den Steampunk-Anteil von Deadlands. Die Charaktererschaffung schließt mit einer graphisch schön anmutenden Karte von New Orleans, deren Beschriftung allerdings sehr klein geraten ist. Kein Wunder, die Karte ist schließlich auch als Poster geplant.

Der nächste Abschnitt beschäftigt sich mit New Orleans im Jahre 1935. In mageren sechs Seiten werden die grundlegenden Informationen wie Verwaltung, Recht und Gesetz und die einzelnen Stadtviertel kurzweilig vorgestellt. An einigen Stellen wünscht man sich aber mehr Informationen. Beispielsweise ist der Abschnitt über das Stadtzentrum eine halbe Seite stark, behandelt darin aber auch die einzelnen Bezirke, so dass für das zentrale Gewerbegebiet leider nur ein kurzer Abschnitt übrig geblieben ist. Da die Totenbestattung in New Orleans deutlich von der Norm abweicht (aufgrund des sumpfigen Bodens werden die Toten überirdisch in Mausoleen bestattet), wird hier in einem kleinen Abschnitt nochmal explizit darauf Bezug genommen. Insgesamt vermittelt das Kapitel einen soliden Ersteindruck von New Orleans und enthält die wichtigsten Informationen, um die Stadtgebiete schon mal grob einschätzen zu können, enttäuscht aber durch mangelnden Tiefgang.

Das kommende Kapitel erweitert die Grundregeln von Savage Worlds um passende Settingregeln. Neben bereits im Grundregelwerk von Savage Worlds vorgestellten Optionalregeln, finden sich in diesem Bereich auch Regeln zu Beinarbeit und Recherche. Es handelt sich hierbei um abstrakte Regeln für Situationen, die nicht unbedingt ausgespielt werden müssen und mit einem Würfelwurf abgehandelt werden können. Interessant dabei ist auch, dass die Regeln den Ermittlern keine Informationen vorenthalten. Es mag den Ermittler ein wenig Geld kosten, oder er könnte auf der Suche nach Informationen aufgemischt werden, aber den Zugang zur Information erhält er dennoch. Auch die Regeln für Soziale Konflikte wurden für Deadlands Noir auf die spezifischen Bedürfnisse angepasst und so existieren spezielle Regeln für Befragungen und schlagfertige Auseinandersetzungen. Darüber hinaus werden Regeln zur Beschattung von Verdächtigen vorgestellt. Informationen zu dem Stand der Kriminaltechnik runden diesen Bereich ab.

Im Kapitel Magie werden die vier mystisch begabten „Klassen“ des Settings vorgestellt und mit Zaubersprüchen oder verrückten Maschinen versorgt. Auch in diesem Punkt beweist John Goff ein Händchen für stimmige mystische Hintergründe: Die allseits bekannten Verdammten, lebende Tote, die einen täglichen Kampf gegen ihren wortwörtlichen inneren Dämon, Pardon, Manitou führen. Den verrückten Wissenschaftlern, die seit dem unheimlichen Westen den Schritt zu Patentwissenschaftlern vollzogen haben, betreten nun auch Voodoo-Priester und Grifter die übernatürliche Bühne. Während die Voodoo-Priester bereits in Deadlands Reloaded eine kleine Rollen gespielt haben und jetzt eine Aufwertung zum vollwertigen mystischen Hintergrund erhalten haben ist der Grifter eine neue Rolle, die es nur in Deadlands Noir gibt. Im Kern handelt es sich bei den Griftern um eine Mischung aus den aus dem unheimlichen Westen bekannten Huckstern und indianischen Schamanen. Das bedeutet, der Grifter muss regelmäßig seinem Laster frönen, wenn er seine Kräfte nicht empfindlich schwächen will. Eine clevere Idee, den naturverbundenen Schamanen in das Großstadtgewirr von New Orleans zu verpflanzen. Die Regeln hierzu sind allerdings ein wenig dünn; entscheidet sich der Grifter, seinem Laster nicht mehr nachzugehen verliert er seine Kräfte nicht vollständig, sondern regeneriert sie nur langsamer, was aber in der Praxis keinen großen Unterschied machen dürfte. In Summe sind die mystischen Hintergründe aber sehr stimmungsvoll und passen gut zum Setting. Die Regeln sind klar formuliert und verändern die zugrunde liegenden Savage Worlds Regeln kaum.

Der Spielleiterbereich beginnt mit einer Weltbeschreibung für den Spielleiter mit einem groben Überblick was die Welt im Moment bewegt und vermittelt einen groben Überblick über die Geschehnisse von Deadlands: Reloaded.

Ein großartiges Kapitel ist der Game Master's Guide to New Orleans, ein 15 Seiten umfassendes Kompendium mit Hintergrundinformationen über Organisationen, Personen und Stadtviertel. Dieser Guide ist sehr ausführlich gehalten und – Kickstarter sei Dank – mit zahlreichen Bildern ausgestattet. Als Kickstarter-Backer hatte man die Möglichkeit, sein Konterfei als Spielleitercharakter in das Regelwerk zu bringen. Eine Idee, die zahlreiche Backer wahrgenommen haben und die nun das New Orleans von Deadlands Noir bevölkern. Ein „Highlight“ für deutsche Spieler dürfte wohl „Dr. Kettensäge“ sein, der, wie mir John Goff versichert hat, auch eine Vorgabe eines Backers war. Die Weltbeschreibung ist in bester Savage Worlds Manier gehalten: Der Guide hat dieselbe Reihenfolge wie die Beschreibungen im Spielerteil des Buches und kleine Symbole weisen auf mögliche Savage Tales hin, die sich in diesem Bereich der Stadt abspielen können. Die Stadtbeschreibung ist sehr umfassend, lässt aber bei den in New Orleans operierenden Organisationen und Unternehmen leider Lücken, mit denen der Spielleiter alleine gelassen wird.

Ein echtes Juwel dieses Buches ist aber der „Mysteriengenerator“, der sich an den Guide anschließt und die Deadlands Noir Variante des Abenteuergenerators ist. Er soll dem Spielleiter bei der Entwicklung spannender Fälle helfen und erfüllt seine Aufgabe als Inspirationsquelle tatsächlich sehr gut. Er verfügt über Tabellen für den Aufhänger, das Ereignis, den Täter, das Motiv, mögliche Beweise und optional noch den Schauplatz des Verbrechens sowie Schwierigkeiten, die die Ermittler behindern oder den Fall komplett auf den Kopf stellen können. Nach wenigen Würfelwürfen hat man auf alle wichtigen Fragen eines Falles eine Antwort, was genug sein sollte, daraus einen spannenden Fall zu konstruieren. Außerdem enthält dieses Kapitel weitere Hinweise, wie man mit Mystery-Abenteuer umgeht, welche Arten von Beweisen es gibt, oder wie Spuren im Spiel vermittelt werden sollen. Leider beschränkt sich das Kapitel auf die Erstellung von einzelnen Fällen. Das Design einer größeren Verschwörung, die sich über mehrere Fälle zieht, wird leider nicht behandelt. Eure Teilzeithelden waren aber auf der Suche und haben diesen Forenbeitrag (in englisch) aufgestöbert, der sich mit diesem Thema umfassend beschäftigt.

Beinahe 40 Seiten sind daraufhin der Plot-Point Kampagne Red Harvest und einem starken Dutzend Savage Tales gewidmet. Die Plot Point Kampagne macht einen sehr ordentlichen Eindruck. Sie hat keinen Weltrettungsplot, sorgt aber auf dafür, dass die Ermittler in New Orleans herumkommen, einige Kontakte gewinnen oder verlieren können und lässt sich wunderbar mit weiteren Fällen strecken. Die Story ist gut gemacht, ist aber deutlich eher Deadlands als Noir. Das bedeutet, dass den Spielern wenige wirkliche moralische Dilemmas entgegen gesetzt werden sondern die Ermittler doch eher eine heroische Rolle einnehmen. Die restlichen Savage Tales bieten eine Auswahl typischer Detektivfälle. Von Mord über Diebstahl zu Kidnapping ist so ziemlich alles in unterschiedlichen Ausprägungen mit dabei. Selbstverständlich ist auch der Horror-Aspekt von Deadlands mit in die Geschichten geflossen und in mehr als einer Geschichte sehen sich die Ermittler übernatürlicher Opposition gegenüber.

Der Anhang des Buches besteht aus ungefähr 20 Seiten Charakterwerten, Bodenpläne dem ansprechend illustrierten Charakterbogen und einem sehr brauchbaren Index.
Multimedial ist das Buch auf der Höhe der Zeit; es verfügt über ein elektronisches Inhaltsverzeichnis, ein voll verlinktes grafisches Inhaltsverzeichnis sowie einen verlinkten Index. Es ist in Layern aufgebaut, so dass der Benutzer Inhaltselemente wie Grafiken oder den Hintergrund für den Ausdruck ausgeblendet werden können. Leider existieren keine Links im Text. Insbesondere die Verlinkung der Spielleiterbeschreibung eines Ortes mit der dazugehörigen Savage Tale hätte sich hier angeboten.

Fazit

Deadlands Noir ist ein gut durchdachtes, spannendes Setting mit Potential. Der Einstieg als Kickstarterkampagne war sehr gut gewählt, die Qualität des Buches hat davon eindeutig profitiert. Kleine Schnitzer, wie unpassende Spielleitercharakter-Namen sind leider die Kröte, die man bei einem solchen Vorgehen schlucken muss. Deadlands Noir gelingt es, das bedrückende Großstadtfeeling eines Noir-Romans mit der Welt von Deadlands zu verbinden. Die Regeländerungen sind sinnvoll, verleiten aber auch dazu, große Teile eines investigativen Abenteuers auf einen Würfelwurf zu reduzieren. Dies ist nur einer von mehreren Gründen, wieso das Setting nur erfahrenen Spielleitern uneingeschränkt empfohlen werden kann.

Unsere Bewertung

Erscheinungsbild: 5/5 Tolle grafische Gestaltung, sehr gut lesbares Layout, super Illustrationen. So macht Lesen Spaß!
Inhalt: 4/5 Spannendes, unverbrauchtes Setting, genialer Abenteuergenerator
Preis-/Leistungsverhältnis: 4/5 Tolles Artwork, viel Inhalt: Hervorragend!
Gesamt: 4/5 Ein wundervoller Settingband, der bereits beim Lesen Fantasien weckt.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Deadlands Noir
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Deadlands Noir
by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/02/2013 07:49:26
Originally posted at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2013/01/02/tabletop-review-deadlan-
ds-noir-savage-worlds/

Although I always found Deadlands intriguing, I never got into the game. For one thing, the old west was never a setting that interested me. For another, my original impressions from reading the core rulebook back in the 90s seemed like the setting borrowed heavily from Shadowrun world-wise, but then put things in the Old West and made things more intentionally evil. Raven and his machinations = the Great Ghost dance, the CSA coming about, Native Americans reclaiming their lands, evil corporations abound. The other was that the rules set kept changing. You had the original rules, the revised rules, the Savage World rules, the d20 version and there was even a GURPS version of all things. Pinnacle was just too all over the place for my liking. Now that said, I thought the writing was fantastic, the mechanics were unique and very memorable and the art was pretty good. It just wasn’t my thing.

Well all that changed earlier this year when Deadlands Noir went up on Kickstarter as a crowd-funded project. I loved the concept and the teases we were given but I was still hesitant to join in, especially as I was funding so many other things at the time. In the end, I didn’t back Deadlands Noir, but I plugged the project heavily in my Kickstarter column and watched over eleven hundred people raise $117,000 for this thing. In late December, the official PDF version of the book was released to backers and via DriveThruRPG.com to people willing to fork over $14.99 for it. I eagerly snatched up a review copy when it was offered and have spent the past two weeks flipping through this, along with my copies of Savage Worlds and Deadlands: Reloaded to fill in mechanics and story gaps.

I should point out that Deadlands Noir is NOT a standalone product. You absolutely need a copy of Savage Worlds to use this book as it is the rules-set Deadlands games currently use. As well, you’ll probably want to be familiar with the Old West version of Deadlands as well to better understand the game and its backstory. You won’t need to know anything about Hell of Earth, the post-apocalyptic version of the game, which is a good thing. I admit that I wish Pinnacle had made this its own standalone book complete with rules ala Vampire: The Dark Ages, or similar products, as it would have brought in a lot more newcomers. Still this way, they make more money as newbies need to buy two or three books and veterans don’t need to wade through mechanics they already know by heart.

Deadlands Noir takes place around 1935 in the same universe that Deadlands: The Wild West/Deadlands:Reloaded takes place in. I know some would expect a Noir game to be set in the 1920s, but setting this game after the 1929 stock market crash and during the dust bowl makes perfect sense considering Deadlands is a depressing and dark game whose antagonists rely heavily on fear and negative emotions. The Roaring Twenties was a pretty upbeat time compared to the Great Depression, wouldn’t you say? The sourcebook talks a little bit about the universe’s history and how it diverges from our own, but for the most part you’ll need Deadlands: Reloaded to really understand the Deadlands universe. That said, you can just play Deadlands Noir with this book and the Savage Worlds core rulebook, but it’s best that the Marshall (system’s term for a DM/GM) is well acquainted with the history of the setting in all its forms. Deadlands Noir really only focuses on the city of New Orleans. In fact, it might have been better to title the book Deadlands Noir: New Orleans because the bulk of the book only covers that city. There is lip service paid to other areas, but you’re pretty much stuck with the Sodom and Gomorrah of the Mississipp’. Other books in the series will cover different locales like Chicago, but for now, this is all we get. So if you really have your heart set on playing Deadlands Noir in a different city, you’ll have to wait or make it up on your own.

Now just because Deadlands Noir focuses exclusively on a single city doesn’t make the book disappointing. In fact, the exact opposite is true. Pinnacle has put an amazing amount of detail into describing their New Orleans of 1935 in the Deadlands world – a feat that is all the more impressive when you realize the book includes new mechanics, a full campaign, several short adventures on top of the campaign, a ton of NPC and antagonist stat blocks and so much more. I was extremely impressed by the amount of content shoved into this one book. With only a fifteen dollar price tag, this is a shockingly good deal. While it’s not the best sourcebook to come out in 2012, it’s still one any Deadlands should pick up. Hell, I’ve only read Deadlands books here and there and I was still blown away by what lay betwixt both covers.

The first third of the book is for players and GMs alike. It covers sample character backgrounds, the house rules for the game that separate Deadlands from a standard Savage Worlds game, new Skills, Hindrances, Edges and gear ranging from guns to submarines. You then get a two page map of the city in its current state and a seven page introduction to New Orleans. After that the section for players rounds itself out with on how to roll detective work, and various forms of magic users (Grifters, Patent Scientists, Voodoo Practitioners and Harrowed) . After that the rest of the book is for GM’s eyes only.

The GM’s section is where things really get good though. That’s where you get to separate fact from fiction in this setting and learn just how severely screwed up the world is. You’ll get a more in-depth look at Fear Levels and also the darker side of magic use in Deadlands Noir. The real gem here though is “The GameMaster’s Guide To New Orleans” which is sixteen pages long and covers all sorts of things from key players to important locales in the city. The other really nice section is “Making Mysteries” which is a seven page guide on how to write a Noir adventure. It even includes a random adventure generator to boot. I tried it out a few times. For example, here’s one I rolled up:

A stranger with a fat wallet and a fatter gut approaches the players with an offer they can’t refuse. It seems a valuable MacGuffin was stolen from him and he wants it back. As the players search the scene of the crime and scour for clues, they’ll eventually discover an old rival of the client stole the MacGuffin believing t was a piece of a bigger puzzle even its original owner didn’t know about. They track down the thief to the Garden District of New Orleans, only to learn he was nothing but a patsy for the man who really wanted it – a congressman. Before the thief can finger the true guilty party, his brain pan gets some unexpected ventilation, leaving the detectives with questions rather than answered, but a recovered McaGuffin whose owner now knows there’s something more to it than meets the eye.

Deadlands Noir also contains an extreme large number of adventures. While none of the adventures are fully fleshed, there is enough meat here that a Marshall can easily run with them. Red Harvest is a campaign of six adventures (seven if you count where the gumshoes put all the pieces together) which really lets players get to know the Deadlands of the 1930s and New Orleans in particular. By the times the PCs are done, they’ve probably made some powerful enemies, but hopefully at least one powerful friend as well. The book also contains a whopping fourteen (that means twenty/twenty-one adventures in all!) “Savage Tales,” which are short little one shot adventures for players who love to huck dice but don’t have a lot of time. These adventures run the gambit from passable to extremely cool, but he fact there are so many adventures in this sourcebook blew me away. Honestly, as I re-read this review, it’s hard to believe Pinnacle’s staff fit all this content into just 145 pages!

Deadlands Noir finishes up with those aforementioned NPC collections, which ensures Marshalls will have all the characters and/or monsters they need to run any of the adventures in this book, or better yet, to help them get started on making adventures of their own. I have to admit I was really impressed by everything in this book and unlike the wild west setting, Deadlands Noir is a version of the game I could actually get my friends and colleagues to sit down and play. It carries on the spirit and feel of the original Deadlands while giving it a whole new fresh twist. I’m really kicking myself now that I didn’t partake in the Kickstarter and picked up some of those extras like the Noir Companion and the dime novel. Even for people new to Deadlands, or those that just have never had the chance to actually play a game of it, this is a really well done book and well worth reading. I can’t wait to see what else comes out for Deadlands Noir and I know I won’t be the only one.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Deadlands Noir
by Jay S. A. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/20/2012 01:18:29
If there’s a genre that seems like a perfect fit for Deadlands, it’s the Noir setting. Taking place after the default Western-genre setting of Deadlands: Reloaded! but not quite as far in the future as Hell On Earth, Deadlands Noir presents a new and exciting spin on the 1930′s.

In an interesting twist, the game takes place in a much smaller stage. Rather than the Weird (or Wasted) West, the game takes place in the setting’s take of New Orleans. I find this to be a good choice, as the Noir genre is inherently bound to the city. There’s a sharp focus involved in the honing of this supplement, and one that shows in all the design decisions. Everything from the skill list to the sample character concepts oozes style and substance appropriate to the genre. Some are also cleverly renamed from their Weird West counterparts, such as the Patent Scientist, and the Grifters.

The highlight of the book for me is the chapter on New Orleans, which includes a gorgeous and very evocative map of the city, and a detailed look at the various locales. The chapter is practically dripping with plot hooks, and I can see a campaign of Deadlands Noir going for a long, long while.

In a nice touch, the book goes on to discuss the nature of Investigation in the Deadlands Noir setting. This is the kind of information that is golden to GMs, as it helps those who aren’t quite so familiar to the setting to adapt accordingly. Rules on interrogation, patter and even tailing a target are all presented in an easy to understand fashion.

The GM section makes up a huge chunk of the book, and for good reason. It goes into great detail on the secrets of the setting, as well as providing advice for running games in true Noir fashion. The GM Guide to New Orleans presents NPCs and the current state of New Orleans as it relates to the people that inhabit (and control) it. An extra section for how to create Mysteries is particularly inspired as well, helping those who are new to this particular style of storytelling to create one with little difficulty. It takes the form of a random generator with multiple lists involving Hook, Event, Perpetrator, Motive, Evidence, Location and Twist. It’s very nice and I can see it getting use even outside of Deadlands.

The book also includes Red Harvest! A campaign-length mystery that will suit any group, and features a ride through a lot of New Orleans’ set pieces, and with plenty of opportunities for getting into trouble. If that’s not enough, there are also a smattering of Savage Tales, mini-adventures that can be incorporated to Red Harvest! or any Deadlands Noir campaign.

Finally the book finishes with a thorough Rogue’s Gallery and a series of excellent maps of various buildings, a cemetery and other interesting locales for encounters.



Few supplements hit all the right spots in the same way that Deadlands Noir does. It has literally everything you could need. An evocative setting, excellent GM advice, interesting and varied Character concepts, an adventure, gorgeous maps, all with an easy to read layout and excellent artwork to go with it.

Savage Worlds is a very popular system, and books like Deadlands Noir are an example of just why that is. I think that Noir continues with the trend of excellence that Pinnacle has been known for.

Definitely a must have for any fans of the genre, the system and the setting.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Deadlands Reloaded: Blood Drive 1-Bad Times on the Goodnight
by Thomas B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/22/2012 21:50:15
WHAT WORKS: The "slice of Weird West life" stuff is very much welcome, with a "common" cattle drive also being peppered with a number of distinctly Deadlands encounters. The Act Two stopover is very nice touch that helps drive home the oddity of the setting. This adventure certainly lives up to the promise of being self contained.

WHAT DOESN'T WORK: If you're running this is a full series, there's an NPC or two with plot armor, and some suspicious players are going to get hung up on that Act 2 stopover I mentioned. $10 for 37 pages may feel like a tad much for some people.

CONCLUSION: I love the "mundane" stuff being in here. Such a great change of pace for Deadlands adventures (which I'm usually a fan of, anyway). This also serves as a great adventure because not only does it combine elements of the "weird" west with the "old" west, but a number of the Savage Worlds and Deadlands Reloaded rules as well (dueling, random encounters, social combat and mass combat). Is it the most awe inspiring adventure? Nah. Are the hooks in this adventure compelling enough to make you NEED to see Blood Drive 2? Not really. But it's well worth picking up, especially for a relatively new group who may not be wildly familiar with the Deadlands setting.

For my full review, please visit http://mostunreadblogever.blogspot.com/2012/11/tommys-take-o-
n-deadlands-blood-drive-1.html

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Deadlands Reloaded: Blood Drive 1-Bad Times on the Goodnight
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Deadlands Reloaded: Blood Drive 2-High Plains Drovers
by Adrian S. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/12/2012 20:45:10
‘High Plains Drovers’ succeeds as both a stand-alone module and as the second part to this series. Whilst some minor adjustments will be necessary to make this work for a group of greenhorns, the prior knowledge which is absolutely essential is minimum, and can be easily imparted through the relevant NPCs.

As with Part 1 of the series, the PCs are still part of a group herding cattle across States to a parcel of land. The promise of a decent wage and a little excitement are paid in full during the adventure. Attention has been paid to make the scenarios in here quite different to the first installment, the developers clearly understand that there is only so much you can do with an adventure about herding cattle – and have worked quite hard to make it a worthwhile play experience.

What does work very well is that the Western motif is front and centre in every scenario, and the blend of ‘weird’ into ‘Weird West’ is done in a manner so as not to overwhelm the players. There is enough attention to the core genre that the supernatural elements are woven in effortlessly. There are supernatural bugs, mad scientists, bound ghosts, and the odd undead or two to keep the story ‘weird’ enough.

The challenges presented are interestingly pitched. I can see that the types of decisions made in the first volume of this campaign were mostly straightforward and would suit a new play group; but this adventure calls for a little more finesse. I’m sure that even new players who had worked their way through the first instalment would now have the confidence to tackle the problems they’ll face in ‘High Plains Drovers’. The set piece combat scenes should prove challenging, with plenty of scope for inventive characters to shine, but this is balanced against investigative and social scenes.

In all, it is a fine piece o’ work, and I now really want to see how this all ends.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Deadlands Reloaded: Blood Drive 2-High Plains Drovers
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Savage Worlds Deluxe
by Stephen K. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/12/2012 17:24:28
I first played the Savage Worlds system in 2011. I was instantly compelled by it's streamlined character creation and rules flexibility. I could immediately see how this system could work in fantasy, modern, sci-fi, or any number of settings in between. The single largest compliment I can give the system is that the rules are simple, fun, and seem to disappear in favour of the story. This does not mean the rules are watered down. Grant it, they are not punchy like GURPS but that's not necessarily a bad thing. If anything, Savage Worlds seems to have found a great balance between the story and the rules.

For the time being, Savage Worlds will be our system of choice in our gaming group.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Savage Worlds Deluxe
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Deadlands Reloaded: Blood Drive 1-Bad Times on the Goodnight
by Adrian S. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/07/2012 18:17:32
‘Bad Times on the Goodnight’ acts as a good introductory campaign for Deadlands, but I would recommend that both the players and Marshal have a few games under their belts before taking it on. The basic premise revolves around the characters being employed to help move cattle long-distance and the challenges against which they must prevail in order to do this. There is enough fodder here for a decent number of sessions, and the information is presented in a very readable manner, which will help novice and experienced Marshals alike. There is some variety in the types of encounters from roping panicked longhorns, to wrasslin’ with railroad thugs, and even a strange encounter in Roswell. The adventure boasts an action-packed finale, with plenty of room for players to spend time strategisin’ (and probably cussin’ by the time it’s over).

The major challenge in running this adventure is two-fold. Firstly, there are a few NPCs who are recurring travelling companions (or adversaries), and if the Marshal runs the other adventures in this series, some effort really needs to be spent to make each NPC shine. The PCs should care about (or hate) the main NPCs and playing on this will provide further motivation, and a chance for some good roleplaying opportunities. This isn’t made explicit, so the Marshal needs to consider how to build this rapport into their game. Secondly is the nature of the job for which they are employed. Basically moving cattle from Point A to Point B doesn’t sound too exciting, and can be a downright linear, mechanical process if you’re not careful. Whilst the premise is quite simple, running this adventure does have a number of subtle complexities. Marshals should consider this as they are planning their session.

That said, it’s a good start to the series, offers a range of situation types from investigation, to combat, to fast-talkin’ and this should make it widely appealing to Deadlands enthusiasts.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Deadlands Reloaded: Blood Drive 1-Bad Times on the Goodnight
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Rippers
by john s. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/30/2012 09:46:41
Great setting. The book is well organized and very entertaining.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Rippers
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Savage Worlds Deluxe: Explorer's Edition
by Thomas B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 10/20/2012 01:04:25
WHAT WORKS: The minis combat works much smoother than I could ever have dreamed. I used to hate minis until SW, and now I’m a convert. I love the middle ground between character customization and Too Much Work. The optional rules and third party support have made Savage Worlds incredibly versatile over the years.

WHAT DOESN’T WORK: I don’t like Power Points. Easily my least favorite part of the system. Some of the selected art in the book is pixilated, marring an otherwise gorgeous book. The Powers have come a long way, but there are times where I find them lacking, even with Trappings. I much prefer the Dramatic Interludes Pinnacle released with Zombie Run over the Interludes that made it into these rules.

CONCLUSION: Savage Worlds is my favorite RPG ever and the best RPG purchase I have ever made. I have used it to run a supers game, two Deadlands campaigns, Solomon Kane (with a single support PC who was seamlessly controlling a party of NPCs), a one shot horror game and a homebrew fantasy game, and I don’t think I have ever not had a blast. Early on in my Necessary Evil game, we had a combat with 29 figures on the map, and it ran as smoothly as any combat I have ever ran…pretty sure that was the point where I fell in love with the game.

Even as a Deadlands fan I prefer the new, Savage Worlds-powered Reloaded version, because combat is faster and smoother, NPCs are quicker and easier to make and the additional material that has been released since Reloaded came out has restored a lot of the missing "flavor" that people complained about with the new version.

I’ve bought the corebook twice (both the “regular” Explorer’s Edition and the Deluxe) and own a ton of books in print and PDF. It’s not a perfect system and it’s not the best system for EVERYTHING, but it does a LOT of things really well (more than it gets credit for, in my opinion). And, in my view, the Deluxe Edition is just a fantastic version of the rules, as I always love more options. There is a reason I am a Savage Worlds fanboy: It’s because I enjoy it more than any other RPG I have ever played.

For my full review, please visit http://mostunreadblogever.blogspot.com/2012/10/tommys-take-o-
n-savage-worlds-deluxe.html

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Savage Worlds Deluxe: Explorer's Edition
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Tour of Darkness Figure Flats
by Gareth L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/12/2012 06:00:36
I really like the Tour of Darkness setting for savage worlds, and some high quality paper figures would really be awesome.

However, the art on these figures is really poor, and I regret the purchase. It's really a shame because some of the other paper figures produced by Pinnacle are really awesome.

I am hoping that Arion Games come up with some "GI" figures to go with their Vietcong line, because those are much better.

Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
Tour of Darkness Figure Flats
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Deadlands Reloaded: Blood Drive 1-Bad Times on the Goodnight
by Roger L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 10/08/2012 01:51:20
http://www.teilzeithelden.de
----

Blood Drive 1 für Savage Worlds/Deadlands Reloaded lädt reisefreudige Heroen zu einer klassischen Wildwest-Erfahrung ein, die in bisherigen Publikationen noch keine wesentliche Rolle spielte: dem Viehtrieb. Zahlreiche Western ranken sich darum – er gehört zum Genre wie der wiegende Gang zu John Wayne. Die Nummer im Titel suggeriert bereits, dass wir hier das erste Kapitel einer insgesamt dreiteiligen Kampagne vor uns haben, die quer durch den unheimlichen Westen führt. Die einzelnen Teile sollen dem Inhalt nach sowohl einzeln wie auch im Zusammenhang spielbar sein; dementsprechend wendet sich Blood Drive 1 zunächst in erster Linie an Greenhorns, die sich ihre Sporen erst noch verdienen müssen.
Erscheinungsbild
Das PDF umfasst 37 Seiten mit dem gewohnten farbig-stimmungsvollen Seitenhintergrund, großer, gut lesbarer Schrift und passenden, aber nicht herausstechenden Illustrationen. Das reißerische, doch durchaus gelungene Cover mit Filmplakat-Nachgeschmack weckt (bei mir jedenfalls) die schmunzelnde Assoziation von der stilisierten „Heldentruppe, wie sie sich selbst sieht“; mögliche Kontraste zu gewissen Realitäten mag sich jeder grinsend selbst ausmalen.

Inhalt

Die Geschichte beginnt in einem kleinen Kaff im Südwesten von Texas, wo die Posse für die Begleitung ebenjenes Viehtriebes angeheuert wird. Die Herausforderungen, denen sich die Helden nun stellen müssen, betreffen weniger Monsterschlachterei, sondern vielmehr typische Aufgaben von Cowboys rund um die Herde wie das Einfangen von Vieh oder Zureiten von Pferden. Nachdem sich die ersten wenig mysteriösen Schurken, quasi mit Schild und Visitenkarte, als solche vorgestellt haben, wird die Luft ein wenig dicker und bleihaltiger. Ohne zu viel verraten zu wollen: es harren noch etliche mal mehr, mal weniger archetypische Wildwest-Situationen der Konfrontation mit den Helden. Nach weiteren Komplikationen kommt es schließlich zum obligatorischen großen Showdown, der ebenfalls vom Geiste der Pferdeopern durchtränkt ist.
Dieser Teil der Kampagne endet sodann bei Denver, mag also dort abgeschlossen oder mit dem nächsten Kapitel fortgesetzt werden; der bisherige Handlungsstrang lässt sich jedenfalls befriedigend auflösen.

Wer bei der Erwähnung des Begriffes Viehtrieb sogleich an eine pfeilgerade Aneinanderreihung von Ereignissen denkt, liegt damit nicht falsch. Perlen auf einer Kette gleich rollen die programmierten Ereignisse lange Zeit an der, auf gut neudeutsch gerailroadeten, Posse vorbei (oder über sie hinweg) und stellen in aller Regel die Würfel in den Mittelpunkt. Erst die Sektion rund ums Finale bietet Variationen an, lässt Freiraum für taktische Einfälle und fordert aktiven Einsatz. Abgesehen von wiederkehrenden Antagonisten existiert keine Hintergrundgeschichte im engeren Sinne, die als Rahmen dienen würde; der Handlungsverlauf gleicht eher einer Besichtigungstour durch den unheimlichen Westen.
Atmosphäre und Charme entwickelt das Abenteuer vor allem durch die Hervorhebung klassischer Western-Facetten und viele genretypische Szenen, denen sich Freunde der Pferdeoper nur schwer werden entziehen können. Blood Drive 1 glänzt zudem mit zahlreichen authentischen Details rund um die Organisation, Durchführung, Gefahren und Komplikationen eines solchen Trecks, die nahtlos ins Abenteuer integriert sind.
Da die Geschichte nur vorsichtige Ausflüge aus dem Western-Flair heraus in die Domäne des Phantastischen, Geheimnisvollen und Unheimlichen unternimmt, eignet sie sich gut für eine DL:R-Einsteigerrunde mit diesem Ansatz. Der thematisch-atmosphärische Fokus würde so während der „Rundreise“ allmählich zu den Besonderheiten des Deadlands-Universums schwenken.

Preis-/Leistungsverhältnis
Nach dem Umfang erscheint der Preis im Verhältnis zu den bisher veröffentlichten DLR-Abenteuern und ähnlichen Publikationen durchaus angemessen. Extrapoliert man aber den Preis der Gesamtkampagne – 111 Seiten für .ca $30 -, so bleibt ein fader Beigeschmack, zumal es der Handlung bisher nicht gelingt, mit wirklich interessanten, weiterführenden Ideen zu punkten.

Fazit

Blood Drive 1 ist ein einstiegstaugliches, aber sehr lineares Abenteuer, dessen erfreulichstes Merkmal es ist, die zuweilen vernachlässigten Western-Elemente des Deadlands-Hintergrundes mit vielen typischen Situationen in den Mittelpunkt zu rücken. Erfahrene Spieler und Spielleiter könnten das vorgegebene Korsett indes arg eng finden und/oder eine kohärente Story vermissen. Wer sich daran nicht stört und vor allem die Stimmung von Tausend Meilen Staub/Rawhide, Die Cowboys oder Red River an den Spieltisch holen möchte, dem wird Blood Drive 1 gefallen.

Unsere Bewertung

Erscheinungsbild 3/5 Gewohnter Standard
Inhalt 3,5/5 Viel Western-Flair, wenig übergreifende Geschichte, sehr geradlinig
Preis-/Leistungsverhältnis 2,5/5 Umfang & Preis haben kein auffälliges Missverhältnis, aber die Gesamtkampagne wirkt zu teuer.
Gesamt 3/5 Einsteigerfreundliches Abenteuer mit Western-Schwerpunkt & starkem Railroading

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Deadlands Reloaded: Blood Drive 1-Bad Times on the Goodnight
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Deadlands Reloaded: Return to Manitou Bluff
by Roger L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 10/03/2012 14:52:18
http://www.teilzeithelden.de
------


Der unheimliche Westen in der zweiten Hälfte des Jahres 1881. Die Reise führt an einen Schauplatz, der als Manitou Bluff bereits seit dem klassischen „Great Maze“ Quellenband etablierter Bestandteil des Hintergrundes war.

Die Clover Mesa inmitten des Great Maze erhielt ihren – neuen - Namen vor nicht allzu langer Zeit, nachdem sie ein katastrophales Beben in vier Teile gespalten hatte; Manitou Bluff existiert nicht mehr. In den Fluten in ihrem Herzen offenbarte sie sodann einen enorm wertvollen Fund: unglaubliche Mengen von Geisterstein. Etliche konkurrierende Fraktionen haben nun Brückenköpfe auf der Mesa etabliert und ringen mit kriegsähnlicher Wucht um die Vorherrschaft auf dem trostlosen Fleckchen Erde...so weit, so stereotyp in Deadlands.

Zum Glück ist das nur die Reichweite des Augenscheines - man darf erwarten, dass sich unter der Oberfläche noch etliche Geheimnisse, Wendungen und schurkische Pläne verbergen.

Gedacht ist das Szenario nämlich nicht für rotznasige Frischlinge; auf den Return to Manitou Bluff (RtMB) von Matthew Cutter für Savage Worlds/Deadlands Reloaded sollten sich nur Helden mit bereits legendärem Rang einlassen.

In der offiziellen Chronologie des Deadlands-Universums baut die Geschichte auf umwälzenden Ereignissen auf, die während der Plot-Point-Kampagne in The Flood geschehen sind (und würde sich zur Fortsetzung eignen); es dürfte allerdings nicht schwerfallen, sie in alternative Verläufe einzubetten.

Der Kampagnenband möchte indes mehr als ein bloßes episches Abenteuer sein. Im Fokus der Darstellung stehen einmal der klar umrissene Schauplatz des Geschehens, und daneben will er die notwendigen Zutaten für eine offene Kampagne feilbieten, Zielsetzung und Anspruch zugleich.

Erscheinungsbild

Der Weg zu den inneren Werten führt, wie stets, zunächst an den schnöden Äußerlichkeiten vorbei. Das bislang erhältliche PDF (eine Druckauflage ist für den Dezember 2012 geplant) präsentiert sich auf 160 Seiten im 6.5″ x 9″ Format, vollfarbig mit großzügigem Layout und großer, augenfreundlicher Schrift, die auf Bildschirmen und Tablets bequem lesbar ist.

Neben dem stimmungsvollen Titelbild entsprechen die Innenillustrationen und Seitenhintergründe dem mittlerweile von Pinnacle gewohnten Standard und pendeln zwischen düster, detailreich, grob und (sehr) bunt. Trotz des vergleichsweise geringen Umfanges hilft dem Suchenden sogar ein Index.

Inhalt

RtMB eröffnet mit einer Sonderausgabe des traditionsreichen Tombstone Epitaph, der marktbeherrschenden Boulevard-Gazette für leichtgläubige Ostküstenbewohner und ambitionierte Monsterjäger. Sie kann als Spielerwissen für den Einstieg in die Geschichte Verwendung finden und bietet einen Überblick über die allgemein bekannten Informationen rund um den Ort des Geschehens und seine Vergangenheit, versetzt mit Mysterien wie weiterführenden Andeutungen, um von hier aus die Handlung in die Kampagne hineinzuspinnen.

Wesentliches zum eigentlichen Inhalt möchte ich natürlich nicht verraten, deswegen möge man mir im Folgenden manch nebulöses Schwurbeln nachsehen.

Unmittelbar im Anschluss nämlich feuert das Buch eine volle Breitseite der großen Geheimnisse der Clover Mesa in Richtung Marshal. Schien es zunächst noch vordergründig so, als würden bekannte Handlungselemente neu gruppiert, so offenbart sich nun Monumentales mit Auswirkungen auf den gesamten Schauplatz. Die Mesa ist zum Spielball gewaltiger metaphysischer Kräfte geworden, und dementsprechend trumpft die Geschichte mit zwei schönen Grundideen und Handlungswendungen auf, die ihr Fundament bilden und sie klar über das Niveau durchschnittlicher Deadlands-Abenteuer heben.

Inspirationen des Autors aus anderen Medien scheinen durch, doch dank des gelungenen Transfers finde ich das nicht tragisch. Etwas dick aufgetragen vielleicht? Schon möglich, aber lieber so als faden Einheitsbrei. Sehr wahrscheinlich werden die SC schließlich einer der mächtigsten Wesenheiten des Deadlands-Universums über den Weg laufen. Man mag an Hand von Geschmack und Stil darüber streiten, ob es sich um eine Banalisierung handelt und es angemessener gewesen wäre, mehr geheimnisvoll-mythische Überhöhung einzubringen. An den damit verbundenen Optionen zeigt sich jedenfalls, dass RtMB seinen Anspruch spielerischer Freiheiten ernst nimmt, und das respektiere ich.

RtMB zeigt eine breite Palette von Ansätzen auf, die SC zum Schauplatz des Geschehens bringen können und flexibel genug sein sollten, um nahezu jede Konstellation abzudecken. Zur Ankunft der SC liefert das Buch noch ein krachende Bruckheimer-Szene voller neuer Technologie, die engmaschig gestrickt scheint; dann folgt eine breite Darstellung der für die Geschichte relevanten Szenerien. Ein von Automatons geschützter Wasatch-Außenposten, ein konföderiertes Fort, eine Bergarbeiterstadt, ein Stützpunkt des chinesischen Kriegsherren Kang, die unheimlichen Ruinen einer Unionsfestung, etliche nicht offensichtliche, ungewöhnliche Örtlichkeiten – allerorten finden sich Subplots oder Elemente der Hintergrundgeschichte, kleinere oder größere Geheimnisse gilt es zu lüften, mächtige Gegner zu überwinden und/oder Verbündete zu gewinnen.

Diese Breite geht zwangsläufig auf Kosten der Tiefe, was sich an den in groben Pinselstrichen etwas lieblos-funktional geschilderten NSC zeigt. Sie mit mehr Leben zu erfüllen, bleibt dem Marshal überlassen. Überdies kommt es mir so vor, als habe jemand über der Mesa einen allzu prall gefüllten Eimer mit zuweilen arg generischen Monstern ausgekippt. Diese oder jene wartende Schießerei würde ich zugunsten der bedeutungsvolleren Konfrontationen lieber auf den Boden des Schneideraumes verbannt sehen. Der für meine Begriffe hohe Hack´n´Slay-Anteil passt zu SW/DL:R, lässt sich aber problemlos modifizieren.

Dennoch: hier spielt das Szenario seine strukturellen Stärken aus. Trotz ihrer Flexibilität enthielten die bisherigen Plot-Point-Kampagnen der DLR-Quellenbücher einen linearen Handlungsfaden, der sich an den Schaltstellen zu stark vorgegebenen Szenen verdichtete. Wer nach einem Abenteuer sucht, um dessen mundgerechte Happen sogleich an die Spieler weiterzureichen und in dem alle nur denkbaren Eventualitäten ausgearbeitet sind, wird sicher ein wenig enttäuscht sein.

In RtMB weicht die gerade Linie nämlich untereinander vernetzten Storyelementen, die Spieler wie Spielleiter nicht auf eine feste Marschroute zwingen. Die denkbaren Handlungsverläufe sind sehr variabel, so dass Spielrunden mit dem dargebotenen Hintergrund dynamisch auf ganz unterschiedliche Weise interagieren können. Die Kampagne lässt trotz vieler Details Raum für gestalterische Freiheit, ohne dabei die bündelnde Haupthandlung aus den Augen zu verlieren.

Früher oder später sollten die SC (man denke an ein Zwiebelschalenmodell) an einer der Schlüsselstellen zu den tieferen Handlungsschichten vorstoßen. Nach der Reise ins „Herz der Finsternis“ reduzieren sich die Optionen etwas, und zugleich erhalten die SC konkretere Möglichkeiten in die Hand, um Dinge in Bewegung zu setzen.

Auch wenn es nach dem Gesagten so erscheinen mag, wird der Marshal – abgesehen von unabdingbar erforderlicher solider Kenntnis des Bandes - kaum Arbeit investieren müssen, um RtMB in ein unmittelbar spielbares Abenteuer zu verwandeln. Einmal werden die möglichen Begegnungen und Konsequenzen von Handlungen der SC ausführlich geschildert (zT sogar mit Vorlesetexten zum Einstieg) . Neben abgeschmackten Standardbegegnungen finden sich auch im Detail viele schöne kleinere Ideen und Nebenhandlungen, die hoffentlich keinerlei Langeweile aufkommen lassen. Zum Zweiten finden sich im Anschluss an die nach Lokalitäten organisierten Schilderungen von Situationen, NSC etc. ausführliche Savage Tales. Sie zeigen mittels verschiedener Handlungsstränge kombinierbare Möglichkeiten auf, wie sich die Geschichte entfalten könnte, möchten also Anleitung, Hilfestellung und Ideenspender sein, um RtMB zu einem dramatischen Abenteuer zu formen - im Ergebnis schlagen sie die entscheidende Brücke zwischen Hintergrundbeschreibung und Abenteuer.

Aktive Runden werden den angebotenen Baukasten zu Nutzen wissen; es fällt leicht, die Kampagne auch über die Grenzen des Vorgegebenen hinaus aufzubohren und den eigenen Bedürfnissen anzupassen. Eher rezeptive Runden sollten angesichts der vielen Hilfestellungen und Notanker dennoch kein erhebliches Problem haben.

Preis-/Leistungsverhältnis

Der geneigte Marshal auf der Suche nach epischen Herausforderungen für seine Helden erhält für 15$ grundsolide 160 Seiten. Wegen des offenen Formates der Geschichte wird die Spieldauer zwar stark von der Umgangsweise der Spielrunde abhängen; RtMB enthält aber sicherlich genügend Ideen und Material, um zahlreiche Spielabende zu gestalten. Daher: meiner Ansicht nach ein sehr guter Deal.

Fazit

Vor dem Hintergrund zündender Ideen auf dem Niveau der „großen Würfe“ der Deadlands-Erschaffer entfalten sich viele mögliche epische Geschichten. Return to Manitou Bluff kombiniert gelungen Quellenmaterial mit flexiblem, offen strukturiertem Abenteuer, das Bewegungs- und Entscheidungsfreiheit gewährleistet. Das Buch verlässt die ausgetretenen Pfade streng linearer Abenteuerkonstruktionen und bietet stattdessen ein durchdachtes und schlüssiges Konzept, das Freiraum wahrt. Die Vernetzung der einzelnen Facetten wiederum sorgt dafür, dass es nicht zu einem reinen Quellenbuch verkommt.

Bonus/Downloadcontent

Die Tombstone Epitaph Sonderausgabe zur Clover Mesa steht als Teaser auf der Pinnacle-Seite zum freien Download bereit: (Klick)

So lässt sie sich zu Einstimmung und Einstieg leicht an die Spieler verteilen.

Unsere Bewertung

Erscheinungsbild 3/5 Solide präsentiert. Nicht mehr, nicht weniger.
Inhalt 4,5/5 Schöne Hintergrundgeschichte, hervorragend in eine offene Szenariostruktur eingebettet & mit flexiblen Handlungssträngen erschlossen
Preis-/Leistungsverhältnis 4,5/5 Sehr gut im Verhältnis zum Umfang und dem Spielwert des Inhalts
Gesamt 4/5 Eine epische Kampagne, die ihrem Anspruch gerecht wird

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Deadlands Reloaded: Return to Manitou Bluff
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Savage Worlds Deluxe: Explorer's Edition
by Devon K. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 09/26/2012 15:03:31
While on vacation recently, I stopped by a game store and found the print version of the Savage Worlds Deluxe Explorer’s Edition. I picked it up and read through it and was amazed at the quality it contained. This book is an amazing value at just $10.

I’ve played Savage Worlds before and have read the old Explorer’s Edition extensively. The rules in the Deluxe version are not a great departure from what was in the previous book. The basics are all there and there have been some minor tweaks to the system. The most notable change was the elimination of the Guts skill from the core rules, which I think is a great move.

The thing that stands out to me the most from this book are the Situational Rules. There was a section in the old book with the same name, but the section stands out so much more in Deluxe. I think part of it has to do with the development notes that are strewn throughout the entire book. And there are now rules for social conflict! Woo!

All in all, this is a wonderful product, and it’s so freakin’ gorgeous! The value you get is worth way more than the $10 that you’re spending. If you dig Savage Worlds, you really can’t be without this book. And, if you’ve never played Savage Worlds, this book is the perfect entry for you. All the rules to play any kind of game you want, at the tip of your fingers.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Savage Worlds Deluxe: Explorer's Edition
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Savage Worlds Deluxe
by Devon K. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 09/22/2012 22:00:14
While on vacation recently, I stopped by a game store and found the print version of this book. I picked it up and read through it and was amazed at the quality it contained. This book is an amazing value at just $10.

I've played Savage Worlds before and have read the old Explorer's Edition extensively. The rules in the Deluxe version are not a great departure from what was in the previous book. The basics are all there and there have been some minor tweaks to the system. The most notable change was the elimination of the Guts skill from the core rules, which I think is a great move.

The thing that stands out to me the most from this book are the Situational Rules. There was a section in the old book with the same name, but the section stands out so much more in Deluxe. I think part of it has to do with the development notes that are strewn throughout the entire book. And there are now rules for social conflict! Woo!

All in all, this is a wonderful product, and it's so freakin' gorgeous! The value you get is worth way more than the $10 that you're spending. If you dig Savage Worlds, you really can't be without this book. And, if you've never played Savage Worlds, this book is the perfect entry for you. All the rules to play any kind of game you want, at the tip of your fingers.

http://sharkbonegames.com/sharkbonecast/2012/09/savage-w-
orlds-deluxe-explorers-ed/

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Savage Worlds Deluxe
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Displaying 91 to 105 (of 575 reviews) Result Pages: [<< Prev]   1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 ...  [Next >>] 
0 items
 Hottest Titles
 Gift Certificates