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Call to Arms: Infernalist
by Carl A. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/31/2009 12:53:48
The Infernalist is a very interesting class. They have great potential for roleplaying, both as a villain and as a PC. The layout is very nice and follows the same formula as the other class books, and the additional feats are quite nice. I could easily see additional classes like this, but based upon other otherworldly powers but changing the automatic feat gained at forth level as well as perhaps the penalty gained (levels of the Tainted flaw) as their level increases.

Personally, I think it would depend on my character's motivation as to whether I'd work on countering the flaw or improving my strengths if I were to play as an Infernalist. If I made the pact out of greed, I'd not worry about the drawback, but if I made the pact out of desperation, I'd probably be horrified at what it was doing to me and fight against that as much as possible. Of course the drawback only really hits full force if you are playing with the Corrupting Magic Campaign Quality, or you have some additional way to gain Tainted levels. But the potential power in the class is hard to ignore in either case.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Call to Arms: Infernalist
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Call to Arms: Monster Slayer
by Carl A. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/31/2009 12:44:00
I'll start out by saying the expert class Monster Slayer is a very useful class when you need to take out a monster (as opposed to a humanoid enemy). Some of his abilities are truly exceptional, especially in Dramatic scenes. You can generally sum this class up as somewhat like a Ranger focused on monsters like dragons, though that isn't a prefect comparison.

My only complaint is that the three feats at the end are NPC only, unlike the other two classes that were put out at the same time, though it is a small gripe as the upper level class abilities are really nice already.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Call to Arms: Monster Slayer
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Call to Arms: Gallant
by Peter I. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 10/29/2009 08:12:34
It's not hard to argue that the d20 OGL revitalised much of the gaming market, and that plenty of quality systems derived from it saw the light of day and are still hugely popular, even after the release of the 4e GSL. One such game is Spycraft, from publisher Crafty Games, which contains a neat set of mechanics and innovations based on the OGL. Recently, however, Crafty Games has released Fantasy Craft, an OGL clone similar to other OGL based games like Pathfinder and Trailblazer. Fantasy Crafty utilizes much of the content that made Spycraft so successful, and creates a stunning OGL game that builds on the OGL in creating a neat and elegant d20 OGL game. This product, Call to Arms - Gallant, is one of several products in the Call to Arms series, each supporting the recently released Fantasy Crafty by providing new classes and associated game material.

This 6 page product comes with both a print and a screen version, and is very neatly and professionally presented. It includes an excellent cover, credits page and OGL page, leaving 3 pages of content to spice up your Fantasy Craft game with. The writing and mechanics are clear and well done, although there could've perhaps been a little more flavor and roleplaying advice associated with the class presentation. Overall, this is a splendid looking product that fits in nicely with other products released for Fantasy Craft.

The Gallant, much like the name suggests, is a social troubadour, a brave and noble warrior that lives the life of high society and knows how to play the system. In many ways, this class reminds me of the bard class, though more specific in that it requires some sort of noble and/or wealthy upbringing. The overall feel and flavor is one that should be quite familiar to most players - a dashing, thrill-seeking noble with society and finance on his or her side. As such, this concept offers not only good combat abilities, but also plenty of social abilities and skills for roleplaying. The class won't always fit into most campaigns, but will do exceeding well in others. I wonder if this isn't in a way an inherent flaw, as the class will either shine or it won't. There doesn't appear to be much of a middle ground here, something that is often associated with classes built on very specific concepts. The pdf does give several useful examples of where the class fits in, and these can guide players in deciding how best to approach this class.

Mechanically the class looks really good, with a well-balanced offering of abilities that will make the character fun to play in combat and social scenarios. It's the kind of extroverted class that always attempts to shine, with abilities like Victory Flourish and Famed Blade enhancing combat ability temporarily in any scene to give the Gallant the chance to show his mettle. While the class may seem quite specific, on paper it looks quite enticing if you like that dashing noble concept, and I have to admit I've not seen something in standard 3.5e OGL that can compare in flare and mechanical execution based on this concept. For that Crafty Games have done really well. To add support to the class, several new feats are presented, mainly focused on the Sword-Circle combat feat and upgrades.

I really liked this product. For all it's specificness and potential pitfalls of that, it does make for an appealing and fun class to play. There's plenty of opportunity to use the mechanics and shape the class to fit a broader style and concept, if you're up to the challenge. Players and DMs will find this class quite useful for both PCs and NPCs, and create exciting characters that should be very memorable. Good pdf.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Call to Arms: Gallant
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Fantasy Craft Second Printing Preview
by Nathan O. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/12/2009 22:31:07
A great Preview Fantasy Craft so give it a go :) mmm

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Fantasy Craft Second Printing Preview
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Fantasy Craft Second Printing
by Dean P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/03/2009 08:30:43
The folks over at Crafty Games have created an excellent game in Fantasy Craft. It is obvious that the people who designed this game have years of experience in gaming. They have gone from their orginal product of the SpyCraft series and produced what 4th Ed SHOULD'VE been. As someone who has always been an advocate of 3.5, I think Craft Games have made something that is a completely fresh look at the game and keeps at the core system that I know and love. I have only read through this book and have yet to have a chance to play, but everything I've read is just amazing. Definitely a great buy!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Fantasy Craft Second Printing
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Fantasy Craft Second Printing
by Nathan C. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 09/28/2009 16:25:44
The end of the Dungeons and Dragons 3.5 era is a great deal reminiscent of the death of superman comic storyline from a while back. After the great superpower is declared dead, several individuals emerged to declare themselves the new holder of the title. Some of them were just as potent as the predecessor while several failed to live up to the expectations.

Created by the innovative thinkers behind Spycraft, Fantasycraft makes a strong argument for controlling the true title as the next version of Dungeons and Dungeons with a creatively enhanced OGL system that takes D&D in a new direction. Several changes places this system on the same high quality level of other leading 3.5 successors like Pathfinder.

Fantasycraft is a 402 page tome with everything you need to run the system within its pages. It contains player creation rules, dungeon master guidelines and monster templates. Fantasycraft is innovative in a way that does not feel too evasive to the D&D experience. There are many places that feel as if it is overcompensating, however, not so much that it changes the balance of the game.

Instead of inundating the reader with a dozen or so chapters, Fantasycraft takes an unintimidating approach by presenting seven chapters that encompass one concept. The Hero chapter goes over character creation. Even to the veteran D&D player, this process will feel unfamiliar. Fantasycraft takes a different approach to character building, starting with a concept and allowing the concept to influence in the game play of the character. Even the traditional feels diverse Attributes are distributed in a point system, and though a bit too overpowered for most DMS, its easily scalable. Origin involves selecting a species (race), talent (special ability) and specialty (extra feat). There are 11 classes then introduced. Some of which, like the mage, allow for a broad interpretation of the class while some, like the assassin, constrict a more rigid view of the class. Finally players select their interests (alignment, language and miscellaneous endeavors).

The next chapter Lore begins by explaining action points, normally something that repeats from edition to edition, but the idea of having action points confirm criticals is refreshing and eliminates the idiotic confirm critical check that has haunted D&D for decades. It also allows the player to activate critical errors on opponents and heal your character. Rounding out this chapter are skills and feats. Skills have been greatly consolidated and each contains an error and critical success text. Feats are split into a dozen categories for easy reference and to simply various class bonus spells.

The Grimoire Chapter introduces spellcasting which adds more interaction for the spellcaster. Spellpoints have always been a simpler way to handle spells than the current Victorian system. Fantasycrafts spells require that you spend the cost of the spell and roll a spellcraft check to see if you succeed. Many of the spells sound familiar and endure only a slight change from their 3.5 counterparts. The system tries to simplifies matters by having one skill beneficial for the caster check and one check beneficial for the spell DC. Most DMs will want to change this to add flavor to the classes. Though it does make since for simplicities sake.

The Forge Chapter presents all items that can be purchased in the system. The entire purchase system is translated into silver and is pretty normal affair. The slight difference is that players can earn coin and purchase special items based off of the reputation.
The Combat Chapter sticks earlier chapters together like glue. There is a lot here to love. So much so, that most of the review would be filled with the things introduced to make the combat great. Here’s a quick run down: Armor as damage reduction, area effect spells that spread out of the spell radius, vitality and wounds done simply, a heal like skill that actually allows players to heal, damage types that add additional flavor and mechanics, a long-term injury chart, simplified mounted combat rules, advanced actions that allow for called shot and parrying etc. The removal of two-weapon fighting and multiple attacks are dealt with by allowing foes to be dealt with easier.

The Foes chapters does more than just display a series of creatures, but shoes how to easily build them based off a point system. Even better, it has a simple conversion chart for converting 3.5 creatures and NPCs.

The last chapter, the World Chapter, should be a throw away chapter, a repeat of things you have previously read in other Dungeon Master Books. However, concepts about how and when to DM fiat and organizing player votes raises it up a notch.

For The Player and The Dungeon Master
Rarely is it hard to pick out just one thing that stands out in the book. In every chapter I found something that induced a “wow” or an “ah”. Even if you are not switching to another system, you can take parts of this and it would greatly add to the flavor of a campaign.

The Iron Word
Fantasycraft may just be the most fun you will have role playing this year. And being a big fan and supporter of a couple of the newer systems, that is hard to say. It is very much Dungeons and Dragons with enough changes to justify switching to a new system. If there is a negative it is that this book is for fans of Role Playing games. Though combat feels simpler, initially it can be daunting, as your options are increased a great deal. Players new to the concept of role playing games or hate the math of role playing games will probably want to limit their options. Still, it is well mixed blend of the good of both 2nd edition and 3rd edition with the foreknowledge of the problems in both. Though it does not have the production value of other systems, it more than makes up for it by reinventing the fantasy genre. It contains the new "it" that 4th edition fans like while maintaining the traditional fantasy feel that pathfinder fans enjoy.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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The Darkest Hour
by Max L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/26/2009 15:42:29
The Darkest Hour is a very well written survival horror adventure. The Npc's are really well done and differ in a positive way from the average undead you get in many other d20 horror adventures. I especially like the undead worm. The pacing of the story is fast and offers many possibilities for the players to explore different solutions. Playing time should be about 4 - 5 hours, but could be easily expanded.
I am very satisfied with this product.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Darkest Hour
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Fantasy Craft Second Printing
by Robert H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/23/2009 01:31:10
When I first cracked open Fantasy Craft, I expected to find a rehash of Dungeons and Dragons in some form or another. I was able to keep up this illusion throughout the opening chapter by telling myself that while the classes were different and there were a few unusual races in the lineup, this was still basically the game that I was already familiar with. The further I read, the more I knew that what Crafty Games had put together was actually something very different than ye ole D&D.

Nestled within its four hundred pages, you will find everything that you need to play the game, including eleven playable races (with a boatload of splinter races), twelve base classes, six expert (prestige) classes, a gallery of NPCs, a bestiary, and all of the rules you will need to start playing the game. Since Fantasy Craft is built on top of the d20 Open Gaming License, the core engine of Fantasy Craft won't be anything new to anyone who has ever played an OGL game. Where Fantasy Craft noticeably departs from the usual mold, though, is the way that it merges concepts that are seen more typically in modern genre games, such as a system for reputation, contacts and allies, looser management of character wealth, and an all around more cinematic approach.

* Races of Fantasy Craft *
Fantasy Craft has a respectable list of playable races, including ones typically only thought of as monsters, such as ogres, orcs and giants, along with some that are alien enough to provide an interesting roleplaying challenge to the hardened fantasy roleplayer, such as rootwalkers (treants), drakes (smaller, less powerful kin of the dragons), and unborn (living constructs such as golems). Each of the races have has its own unique list of advantages and disadvantages to playing them that goes beyond the simple plus two to this attribute, minus two to that. Even humans got a lot more attention with a generous list of "talents" to choose from, making them a lot more attractive to play than I have seen in other d20 based games.

In an era of RPGs where other systems encourage GMs to find a way to say "yes," to their players, banned actions seem a little harsh. This rule makes it difficult or impossible to play a character that goes against its racial stereotypes. For instance, ogres can never attempt to take a diplomatic approach and make influence checks, and dwarves can never learn to swim. I would have preferred to have seen a system that gave them a penalty to skill checks instead of banning the race from making an attempt outright. The player experience could also be improved by giving the player options to effectively buy off the penalties with feats.

* Classes of Fantasy Craft *
Core classes include the assassin, burglar, courtier, captain, explorer, keeper, lancer, mage, priest, sage, scout and soldier. Right away, it is evident that these aren't simply reprints of the d20 SRD classes. In fact, the only classes that strongly resemble a 3.5 SRD counterpart are the mage and burglar. Each class also features a "core ability." For instance, the assassin's core ability, "Heartseeker," improves the assassin's base attack bonus when he is attacking what is known as a special character -- basically, this is anything that actually has hit points and isn't part of the masses. These core abilities are only gained from your first level in your first class. This is an effective mechanic that allows Fantasy Craft to provide a nice boon in a class right from level one, without opening it to being abused by acquiring multiple "core abilities," via multi-classing.

* Artwork *
Other than the cover art, the rest of the book is completely illustrated in black and white. Nonetheless, the artwork is high quality and compelling with lots of little subtleties to hunt for. (Get a preview of some of the art in this P&PG review: [...]) The bestiary section, however, could have used more art and would have ideally had a visual representation for every monster listed.

* The MasterCraft Engine *
Fantasy Craft is the first game to feature Crafty Game's new adaption on the d20 engine called MasterCraft. MasterCraft is described as a lighter, faster, and sleeker version of the Spycraft 2.0 mechanics. Having never looked over the Spycraft game in any detail, I can't really comment on how complicated Spycraft was. What I can say is that the system in Fantasy Craft brings a lot of great innovations to the gaming table by doing away with things that complicated or slowed down play in d20, and simplifying other things that were always confusing to players and GMs alike.

* Armor Works Like It Should *
Although this is a subtlety of the system that few might consider to be all that important, one of my gripes with d20 has long been the way the system handles armor. It doesn't make sense that wearing a heavy suit of armor somehow makes a character more difficult to hit. In Fantasy Craft, armor works more like I would expect by providing its wearer with resistance to certain types of damage instead of helping the character avoid damage outright. Instead, the game gives every class a new "defense" score right alongside of the typical saving throws that represents the character's skill at avoiding physical attacks. Perfect!

* Quicker Recovery and Less Dependence on Healers *
Fantasy Craft features two hit point pools -- vitality and wounds. Vitality is explained to be a "mixture of endurance, luck and the will to fight." This is what your character gains every level as he becomes a more experienced combatant, whereas wounds represent actual physical damage. Although the system provides a couple of sneaky tricks that can bypass vitality and immediately do wound damage, most of the time the character is going to lose all of his vitality first before taking any real damage. This gives the game a more cinematic feel where the character narrowly avoids hit after hit until his defenses are worn down and he finally suffers a serious injury.

Vitality recovers very quickly -- pretty much one night's rest will recover all vitality. The game also provides a means for players to heal themselves in and out of combat using action dice. All of this means less down time and less reliance on having a healer in the party.

* Streamlined Skills *
The skill list of Fantasy Craft is noticeably slimmed by combining like skills with each other. Each of the skills then has multiple uses. For example, the skill Acrobatics merges three skills found in D&D 3.5 into one for balancing checks, jump, and tumble. By combining them, it is much easier to have a more diverse selection of skills, especially given that Fantasy Craft is very generous with skill points to all classes. The game also completely does away with knowledge skills in favor of a single unified knowledge check.

* Abundant Feats *
Fantasy Craft features a long list of feats that players are sure to enjoy. My favorites among these are the weapon feats, which finally give players a reason to choose a weapon for something other than just whatever does the most damage, but these aren't just a bunch of combat feats, either. True to its theme of supporting everything from a very tactically-oriented game to a heavy roleplaying and social game, Fantasy Craft delivers an expansive array of feats for whatever type of character you are trying to build.

* Modular NPC Design *
Fantasy Craft features a wide array of prebuilt NPCs and monsters to challenge your party, and the game takes a unique approach by making all of the stat blocks modular. In other words, any monster you'll find in this book can be used at all levels of play. They simply plug in at whatever level your group is currently at and are ready to go. You'll need to do a little math and cross-referencing of charts to determine the NPC's actual scores first, but fortunately, this process is easy and quick enough that you should be able to do it on the fly at the gaming table with only minimal downtime. This also comes with the huge advantage of being able to use modules more easily regardless of what level of play they were designed for.

While you're perusing the NPC section, you'll also find a rather exceptional NPC Generator for stating out your own cast of NPCs and critters. This system goes way beyond the scant advice typically given in other games and provides a very precise way for building a creature's attributes, special abilities, attacks, defenses, et cetera, and determining exactly what the experience reward for such a creature should be.

* Campaign Qualities *
Although this section is a mere five pages or so, it packs a lot of punch. Essentially, campaign qualities are a list of optional rules that the GM can apply to his game depending on the feel he wants for his game. For instance, the "Doomed Heroes" quality makes it far more likely that critical hits will be confirmed against the player characters, whereas the "Iron Heroes" quality makes it much more difficult for characters to die from massive damage. Campaign qualities are one of the things the authors have already mentioned that plan to expand on, so I expect we'll probably see a lot more of these as new products in the Fantasy Craft line are released.

* "Your Dungeon, Your Dragon, Your Way" *
This is the slogan emblazoned on the back of the book, and it is one of the key goals of Fantasy Craft. It is obvious throughout the book that the designers put a lot of time and thought into providing a framework that could support whatever type of game the game master imagines. With options like campaign qualities, a comprehensive NPC builder, and a book chock full of options for tactical and roleplaying heavy games alike, Fantasy Craft delivers on that promise.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Fantasy Craft Second Printing
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Fantasy Craft Second Printing
by Carl A. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/11/2009 23:56:19
I played Spycraft back when it was in version 1.0 and D&D was at 3.0, so when I heard about 3.5 coming out, I thought I knew what it was going to be like. I expected the sort of adjustments to the rules that I saw in Spycraft, but I was wrong. They decided to make minor adjustments and call it 3.5. Well, Fantasy Craft is exactly what they should have done. The rules, while detailed, are easy to understand. The options for character creation and in development are expansive. My only issue with it so far, is I can't decide what to make first!

If Fantasy Craft were a video game, I'd say there is tons of replay available. You have so many different ways to build a character, and different places you can branch out after creation, and none (or almost none) of them are wrong (or gimped). They all give you different options during play that are useful in different ways. The best way I can describe it to someone who has never played Spycraft would be if you took the ideas of Feats and applied it to everything. You have things that are sort of like feats in character creation, called Talents (human only) and Specialties (all species, including humans), that come from your background (Are you a Strong Human Barbarian, or a Wise Human Cleric?) and these are important aspects, even before you get to your class (So the Wise Human Cleric might be a Priest, or a Keeper, for example, since Cleric isn't a class, it's a Specialty in Fantasy Craft).

If you are on the fence about buying it and you like systems with crunchy bits, then it is a must have. If you liked D&D 3 (or 3.5) then it is a must have. If you liked Spycraft and like fantasy games, then it is a must have. If you prefer really rules lite games, then this probably isn't the game for you. But even then I'd suggest giving it a try, because it really is that awesome.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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Fantasy Craft NPC Builder
by max l. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/09/2009 04:01:56
both products the "npc stat converter" and the "web npc builder" work very well! the npc builder is an awesome online tool to create FantasyCraft monsters. since the npc system lets you create monsters that can be scaled for an threat lvl. , you need to convert your stats into the appropriate in game lvl. you want. the stat converter will manage this for you and turn your npc stats into a "ready to play" npc stat block.
i wish more companies would offer such useful GM freebies!!!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Fantasy Craft NPC Builder
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Fantasy Craft Second Printing
by Kyle H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/27/2009 15:06:35
FantasyCraft is a true epic fantasy game, with streamlined, yet detailed and flexible, combat rules.

At nearly 16,000 possible character combinations, FantasyCraft provides 100x the options for starting characters than D&D 3.5 or 4th edition, due to its Origin system.

FantasyCraft lists 12 distinct non-human species, which is double what D&D 3.5 offered. There is no half-this or half-that, which I find refreshing, as it opens up species which I have not seen readily available to play, such as Drakes.

Humans have 25 talents to choose from, which are one-word adjectives that define who your character is. These really help distinguish starting characters from one another, along with specialties.

In addition, all characters get to choose a specialty for their character. These define your character’s role, as much as the class you pick. Each provides an assortment of abilities tailored for that role. Among the lists are each of the D&D 3.5 base classes, as they are so weaksauce that they’re only a specialty, and you should go pick a real class.

The classes have a wider variety than D&D 3.5 or 4th edition offers, with each one unique and distinct.

Mages have access to all spells, including healing, which follows almost all fantasy settings not based on D&D. Priests gain abilities based on their path (faith), which can include spells, but not always. A priest can be used to emulate a “witch doctor” quite easily.

The only issue I have with the system is that it encourages most of the non-human Species to follow the iconic roles their species does best.

It is a wonderful book from cover to cover. With being a player’s guide, gm’s reference, and bestiary all in one, it is well worth having.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Fantasy Craft Second Printing
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Fantasy Craft Second Printing
by max l. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/25/2009 11:49:33
FC is the most extensive toolbox for d20 fantasy gaming I know of. There is enough material within these 400 pages to fill 2 player’s guides, a dm guide and a monster manual. It also includes a npc generation system that beats everything I have ever seen. I really can’t imagine a monster type you can’t build with this system. The system is flexible enough to play any fantasy setting I know of, from all the classic D&D settings to 7hsea or Warhammer, just pick what you like.
Classes: 12 of them+Expert and Master classes! This chapter gives you classes that can build nearly any fantasy char you want.
It’s more versatile than other systems and classes offer more options.
Origins=Race: 24 different human species talents!! 12 other fantasy races!! Races in FC are stronger than other d20 races. That means a dwarven warrior is something completely different than a human warrior throughout all lvls.
Specialty: resembles the background your char comes from (barbarian, aristocrat, artist, archer…). Among other things it gives you an additional starting feat.
Feats:
Lots of them! FC feats are all about giving your char tricks and stances. There is no boring feat like “you get a plus 1 bonus”. Every feat gives you something special and crunchy. If you’d like to play a classic d20 setting like the Realms or Eberron, these feats will enable you to do so (in my opinion better than the 3.5 system)
Skills:
The best d20 skill system, I have used so far. Fast and streamlined but also detailed enough to make building weapons and other stuff an interesting part of the game instead of a boring single dice roll
Every skill is mechanically useful; a Halfling cook can buff his teammates with a nice breakfast.
Magic: Spellcasting requires a Spellcasting skill check. Spells cost Spellpoints which are gained by several sources. 0 lvl spells cost no Spellpoints, so casters have an endless pool of cantrips. Saving throws against spells are DC 10 + the caster’s charisma
modifier + the caster’s number of Spellcasting feats.
Gear:
My favorite chapter, lots of weapons! While most d20 weapons simply do dmg, different weapon qualities ensure that every weapon has different effects. That means weapons differ al lot more than only by means of dmg and crit range. The damage reduction of armor in combination with different armor piercing values makes weapons and armor much more fun and interesting.
Reputation and Prizes:
In short: players need to spend reputation they earn through completing adventures to be able to buy and create magic weapons. This works also for holdings and contacts (-_ could be a source that sells potions).
Renown is also bought with reputation, and resembles your social status. This is important to call in Favors (combat training, blessings, hirelings…)
Keep in mind that these rules can also be excluded from the game.
Combat:
If you are familiar with d20 combat, you will easily find your way in this chapter. It focuses more on playability than realism, it’s fast and tactical. You can plan ambushes with tactics checks (skill) and teamwork can be improved with feats.
Worlds:
This is a DM chapter, it gives you everything you’d expect from a DM guide, but due to the Mastercraft system, I think the game is better manageable for the dm. (Action Dice, giving Reputation…)

To summarize: I don’t think I’ll ever play another d20 fantasy system than FantasyCraft!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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Fantasy Craft Second Printing
by Rodrigo J. R. T. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/20/2009 01:39:03
I really think this book is great!!

As mentioned by others:
*** An excelent system to create NPCs
*** FEATs again are escencial.
*** NOT a hack an slash system (but can be if u want)
*** 3 new very interesting things: Reputation, Lifestyle and action dices!!!

The only thing Im not very "happy" or maybe dont find the correct form is the magic for the mage.

I didnt find any restriction to know spells then a mage healer is posible and with divine assistance...
but I think the rules are so flexible that I can say (as a DM or GM lol) what kind of magic any one can use!!!

Excellent work 5 stars is correct!!!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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Fantasy Craft Second Printing
by Derek H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/12/2009 21:11:25
Hoping that I could find a good middle ground between what 3.5 did right, what 4e fixed, and avoiding what 4e broke, I bought Fantasy Craft. I was not disappointed, and was in fact given more for my money than I had dared to hope for. Ridiculously diverse races and classes, the ability to run any kind of adventure at any level due to sliding monster stats, a great gear system, are great points of the book. But the big thing is only when you've taken in the whole package, just well-thought-out and obviously extensively playtested rules throughout the book have removed all of those strange quirks you saw in 3.5, and the balance is just great. The only thing I found wrong was that a couple skills have been split, but some others have been logically joined together and everyone has tons of skill points, so the impact of this little bit of strangeness is minimized. Highly recommended.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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Fantasy Craft Second Printing
by Joshua K. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/12/2009 11:56:49
After giving D&D 4th Ed. a go, and giving it up in complete disillusionment, I looked forward to FantasyCraft. I was not disappointed in the slightest.

The book's already many classes are easily customized with Specialties to bring an entirely new flavor to the character, like the old 'class kits'. Instead of ECLs we have special abilities granted by feats, bringing user-friendliness to a lot of popular character types.

The NPC creation system allows an adventure to be scaled quickly and easily to any character Level. And the Reputation system helps GMs control the 'magic item lottery' that focuses too many fantasy games on all the magic 'bling' the characters can accumulate, and not on their innate skills.

Finally, the system actively encourages tweaking, through the use of campaign qualities. Want a historical game and no magic? Easily do-able. Want characters to have more/less feats, skill points, critical hits? All easily done.

All in all, I can't recommend FantasyCraft too highly.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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