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Classic Spycraft: Spycraft Espionage Handbook
by Nicholas Y. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/07/2008 13:33:32
This is probably THE espionage game out there. It is also highly flexible, allowing for missions that are military special operations to the classic James Bond type mission to realistic missions.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Classic Spycraft: Spycraft Espionage Handbook
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Classic Spycraft: The Shop Threat Book
by Nicholas Y. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/07/2008 13:31:45
The book seems to add an interesting element to the rest of Shadowforce Archer. I think this addition adds a lot of amazing possibilities to the game. It is a truly amazing add. It adds elements that I highly appricate, considering that I consider myself a slight technocrat.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Classic Spycraft: The Shop Threat Book
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Classic Spycraft: Hand of Glory Threat Book
by Nicholas Y. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/07/2008 13:29:44
The book seems to add an interesting element to the rest of Shadowforce Archer. I think this addition adds a lot of amazing possibilities to the game. Its a good add on, although the realm of mysticism can be difficult to comprehend.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Classic Spycraft: Hand of Glory Threat Book
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Bag Full of Guns: This Is My Rifle
by JD S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/16/2008 21:05:26
OK, but the lack of illustrations hinders the utility of this product.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Bag Full of Guns: This Is My Rifle
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Bag Full of Guns: This is my Gun
by JD S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/16/2008 21:02:40
OK, but the lack of illustrations hinders the utility of this product.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Bag Full of Guns: This is my Gun
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Bag Full of Guns: This is my... [BUNDLE]
by JD S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/16/2008 20:54:39
OK, but illustrations would have made it a much better asset.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Bag Full of Guns: This is my... [BUNDLE]
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Spycraft 2.0 Rulebook - Second Printing
by Nestor M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/29/2008 15:38:24
I'm trying to list all the superlatives in the English language in my head. Wow, too much, let me sum up. F*&@$*g Amazing!! I run for two groups in Orlando Florida and my players wanted a break from fantasy. We may never go back!!! (Ok, maybe not for a while.) Great book, great system, worth every penny. The gear selection process slows the game down a bit, but the idea behind reserve items makes every character want to be McGyver. Great system, very versatile, may try to use it for fantasy instead of that other monolithic brand.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Spycraft 2.0 Rulebook - Second Printing
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Agent X: One-Man Army
by Alan K. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/25/2008 18:42:50
AgentX: One Man Army is the first in a series of short topic PDFs.

The PDF contains the One Man Army expert class and the partner feat chain.

What is the one man army?

I'll spell it out for you: John McClaine. Yeah, there are other "tough guy" hero figures, but I'd have to say that it's the Die Hard movies series that made the concept deserve its own class.

There are no class skills for crashing cars into helicopters. But there is a class ability called "Yippee-ki-yay". The class abilities are all about taking a lot of punishment and dishing it out against all odds (one ability, I stand alone, gives BIG bonuses when you are outnumbered.)

Of course, the class works well for any of your classical punishment-taking heroes like Rambo or your typical Van Damme character (Martial Artist/OMA!). I'm sure Jack Bauer had a few level in it by season 5 of 24.

Of course, if the class says "Die Hard", the Partner Feat Chain said "Lethal Weapon". Or, any of a number of martial arts flicks with good "partner" fight choreography. There are 3 feats in feat chain (standard for SC 2.0 feat chains). Partner basics lets you elect one "partner" at the beginning of a combat, and gives bonuses to your partner while adjacent. The later feats give more bonuses, and all of the feat's have bonuses that improve if your partner has the feat chain 2.

In addition to the actual mechanics, there are brief sections with recommendations for making a character using the class, and ideas for playing the character, including cultural influences. (They didn't mention Die Hard, but maybe they thought it was obvious.)

The one thing I felt was missing: it always seems like tough guys are getting tortured and shrugging it off. But there is nothing in the OMA class other than resolve as a class skill that really emphasizes that. The poor OMA doesn't even have a good will save. I'm thinking if I ever run this class, a bonus Hold Out feat may make in somewhere into the mix.

In the final analysis, for under 2 dollars, it seems like some players will derive some fun from the mental nuggets that this class and feat chain convey, which should make it worth it.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Agent X: One-Man Army
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Classic Spycraft: U.S. Militaries
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 04/14/2008 11:18:34
An RPG Resource Review:

The book opens with an Introduction that explains that it, along with World Militaries, is designed to facilitate the creation of characters (and of course NPCs) in military service, whether they are now involved in intelligence activities or still on active service. Due to the rules compatibility, it's good for producing recruits (or opposition) for Stargate SG-1 games as well.

Chapter 1: The Department of Defense provides an overview of the way in which the US armed services operate and are controlled, and is particularly useful to those readers (like myself) who are not Americans. Basically, the US President is the Commander-in-Chief, and his chief advisor on matters military is the Secretary of Defense, a cabinet-level civilian appointee who heads the Department of Defense. This has a mixture of civilian and military (usually serving on secondment) staff with various areas of expertise... and of course, everything is subject to Congressional oversight as well. The Army, Navy and Air Force each have their own departments within this structure, with the Marine Corps coming under the control of the Department of the Navy. The US Coast Guard occupies an interesting position, they are controlled by the Department of Homeland Security in times of peace (formerly they belonged to the Department of Transportation) and switch to the Department of the Navy in case of war.

As well as a lot more detail on the command structure and funding of US armed forces, this chapter also contains a brief introduction of the Uniform Code of Military Justice. This is the body of law to which everyone in uniform is subject, and includes not only things you'd appear before a civil court for (like murder or theft) but things like disobeying a lawful order or conduct unbecoming an officer. And of course, spying! While followers of the TV show 'JAG' will be familiar with this, there’s a brief outline of sample charges and the punishments meted out to the guilty, as well as an outline of how a court martial works. The chapter ends with a comparative rank chart for all services.

The following five chapters look at each service in turn: Air Force, Army, Marine Corps, Navy and Coast Guard. Each follows a similar format, looking at the history, organisation, training, tactics and traditions and customs of each branch of service. There's a wealth of fascinating detail in each chapter which should enable a player unfamiliar with that branch to at least have some idea of what his character might have done during service. Note the 'done' – the whole thing is written as if a character's service has been completed before the game begins… not always the case, particularly if you want to use this book with Stargate, as most members of a Stargate team are serving military personnel who have been transferred to Stargate Command for the duration of their service there. The 'Training' section in each chapter covers the entry requirements and basic training given to all recruits, as well as more specialist training available later and the routes to service available to potential officers, and details of some of the most renowned training facilities to which service members may be assigned. A few notes on attributes and skills required or imparted are included, but these chapters are rules-light. They are amply illustrated with line art of personnel and equipment – I can recognise many of the military vehicles which are quite accurately depicted, but captions would have been a nice touch.

While these chapters provide a good introduction and overview, people wishing to inject more realism into military characters would do well to undertake some research online (unless of course they are veterans themselves). As well as official and other sites devoted to the different branches of service, you'll find that many bases and ships have their own websites; and there are also ones devoted to particular specialties and even to minutiae like uniforms and medals.

The final chapter is devoted to new rules arising from the military emphasis of this book. It starts with a discussion of mechanisms for determining what rank a character with a military background held, or – in the case of a game with a military intelligence setting – still holds, including in the latter case how to calculate promotion chances based on performance and seniority (modelled by recalculating the promotion prospects every time the agent gains a level). There are even negative modifiers for those who blot their copybooks during play – along with notes for which actions might attract a court martial or even a 'Big Chicken Dinner' (the slang term for a Bad Conduct Discharge). More notes on how a military game might operate follow, including the chain of command, giving and receiving orders, and even decorations that may be awarded by the GC if the agents show particular courage or devotion to duty.

Next comes a look at the US Military as a set of Spycraft 'Department' options, with the benefits and penalties each one would give you if chosen during character generation. Firstly you choose the branch of service, and then your specialty within that service. Next comes an array of military-based Feats which you may choose for your character. There are also some military NPC classes to cover the folks you’ll meet when venturing onto a military base or otherwise mixing with the armed forces.

The next set of rules relate to a neat idea – a series of 'training programs' which may be purchased using Gadget Points to give an agent a mission-useful skill on a short term basis... it's something that has certainly come in handy in some of the Living Spycraft serials when, for example, the agents have to make a HALO drop into enemy territory but don’t happen to know how to parachute! The benefits last only for the serial in which you request the training, but it's possible to requalify by paying the GP cost again although you don’t have to spend as much time on this 'refresher' course as you do on the original training.

Then we take a look at some of the resources that access to the military may provide during a mission – like calling an air strike in on the Bad Guy's position, for example. One particularly useful one for agents overseas is the ability to gain the cooperation of a US Embassy's Marine Corps security detail. There are also new bundles to ask for, a detailed exposition of the Battle Dress Utility uniform, military-style medical equipment and even dress uniforms and swords – again, search the web if you want to know what all these items look like. These little details, which may seem trivial to a civilian, are extremely important to any serving or veteran personnel you encounter! There's a list of the standard weapons found in each branch of service, with the note that serving personnel are strongly discouraged if not outright forbidden to carry other weapons instead. The chapter rounds off with copious details of military vehicles that may be available, and a section on converting these Spycraft rules for use in Stargate games – most of the differences are ones of nomenclature than substance, as the rules are basically the same for both games. The book rounds off with a glossary of military terms and slang.

This book really provides good background material for people who wish their characters to have realistic backgrounds in the armed forces of the United States. There are some niggling inaccuracies, and it is difficult for a character to actually progress in a military career (apart from the promotion rules) during play. You'd need to do some work if you want to run a military campaign.

Overall, it is an excellent overview of the armed forces of the United States, which would be good reading for anyone wishing to portray a veteran character, even if it's in another contemporary game setting.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Classic Spycraft: U.S. Militaries
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Classic Spycraft: World Militaries
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 04/13/2008 11:01:53
An RPG Resource Review:

World Militaries sets out to do for the rest of the world what US Militaries did for the armed forces of America – provide an outline of what goes on in different services and hence what kind of background and training prior service therein might give an agent. Naturally, given its scope, the amount of information provided on any one unit is small so further research is necessary should you require more detail.

The book consists of 6 chapters, five of which look at different parts of the world and the final one of which is the 'new rules' section. Coverage varies considerably, based on the authors' knowledge of different nations' armed forces – and probably the likely interest amongst players and GCs in using them as background either for agents or for the game as a whole.

The first chapter looks at Asian forces, namely those of the People's Republic of China (complete with the incongruously named People's Liberation Army Navy!), the Republic of India, Japan and both North and South Korea. A standard pattern is followed for each country, explaining the general composition of their army, navy and air force. There are notes on training, specialist units, likely arms and equipment and traditions; and a note on their views on gender and ethnicity – i.e. how well integrated into their forces are females and members of minority ethnic groups within that nation.

The second chapter is based around European forces with the exception of the United Kingdom, which gets a chapter to itself. Here we find France (including the French Foreign Legion complete with the Kepi Blanc), Germany, Norway and Poland. A useful feature of each nation's entry is a table of ranks, including the correct foreign language titles, so when encountering someone from one of these forces, they can be addressed correctly! This chapter also contains notes on the organisation of NATO and on the Geneva Conventions – the code that governs the treatment of prisoners of war. Finally it covers the Hague Conventions, another international agreement that defines the terms under which war may be waged – including how a state of war is formally declared and which weapons are deemed so repellent that they should not be used in combat. And, should your agents – or their enemies – really step over the mark, there's an introduction to the concept of war crimes.

Chapter 3 deals with Middle Eastern Forces. Here we learn about the armed forces of Iran (where, unlike the rest of their Islamic society, women are encouraged to participate fully albeit only as non-combatants), Israel, Pakistan (oddly, I'd have put them in with India) and Saudi Arabia.

Russian forces are the focus of Chapter 4, with quite extensive details of the various services of the current Russian Federation – and how things have changed since Soviet days. This could provide an interesting basis for a game, with former and current members of Russian forces seeking to carve out a living for themselves.

The last chapter of the survey of world militaries looks in detail at the armed forces of the United Kingdom. Within the British Army, the basis for much tradition is the regimental system – and anyone interested in exploring this further should hunt down the British Army's website and follow links to the different regiments. To a British soldier, the regiment is everything, and you’ll find veterans telling you that they served in the Cheshire Regiment rather than merely telling you they have been in the army! The Royal Navy and Royal Air Force are rather more homogenous, although they are not lacking in traditions either. This chapter includes notes on the armed forces of Canada and Australia, Commonwealth countries whose armed forces are structured on largely British lines.

Chapter 6, the final chapter of the book, is the rules section – no rules information appears in the preceding chapters. It begins by defining 'military agent' as an agent who is a serving member of the armed forces. The first rules cover new departments based on a selection of the units described in the preceding pages, ranging from Russian conscripts to Gurkhas, the French Foreign Legion and even Israeli military chaplains! Next comes some notes on specific military uses of existing skills – such as using Innuendo to denote your mastery of military field hand signals! – and a series of feats to develop your expertise at Close Quarter Battle, as well as Quick Study (you pick up new information fast) and Threat Analyst (you know a lot about the opposition's forces, each time you take the feat you pick the nation you wish to study).

Then come some NPC classes, mostly of use when you need an expert in a specialist field such as a Combat Engineer, and none of the agents have the skills required... or of course, as cannon-fodder such as a Third World Conscript. We then move on to training programmes, which allow agents to purchase the necessary skills for particular skills such as diving, escape and evasion, or even prisoner handling and political indoctrination. There's a bit about the sort of resources that a military agent in good standing can draw upon, and some extra military equipment you can requisition. This includes protective clothing, some new kits and a range of survival gear which you really shouldn't leave home without! For some rather bizarre reason, individual protective equipment (the formal name for the uncomfortable suit and respirator you wear in case of nuclear, biological or chemical threat) is described as MOPP – the US term for it, and the various levels of protection required also detailed according to the US system. There's also some ground, sea and air vehicles, vehicle equipment (want to air-drop that Land Rover?) and new bundles that cover regular issue kit for specific roles or tasks... including a humanitarian aid kit complete with comic books and soft toys for any distressed children you encounter! Even submarines and main battle tanks are covered, should the need arise.

The chapter winds up with notes on conversion to the Stargate SG-1 rules, useful as the majority of Stargate team members have a military background. There's also a thumbnail sketch of how much various countries spend on their armed forces and the qualifications (in terms of attributes and skills) for entering the officer corps or enlisted ranks in the various units looked at within the book.

The book gives a good overview of the armed forces of selected countries that agents might either come from or need to visit in the course of their careers. However, if you want to use any particular nation's armed forces as a major element in your games, you will want to research them in far more detail than can be contained here. The fairly standard line art does not contribute much to the book and there are one or two minor errors (like a piece of text repeated on a different page) that really ought to have been spotted.

Probably more use as background material than for forging your campaign setting, there is some excellent flavour material that can be used to round out agents or for that matter their enemies that come from the countries covered in this book. A lot of the equipment is very useful, whether or not your campaign has a military slant.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Classic Spycraft: World Militaries
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Classic Spycraft: Battlegrounds
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 04/13/2008 10:42:33
An RPG Resource Review:

Like the preceding two 'military-oriented' books from this publisher (US Militaries and World Militaries) this work is divided into several chapters of information on various topics, followed by a single 'New Rules' chapter which demonstrates how to utilise the information within a game. The aim – declared in the Introduction – is to provide some contemporary, historical and future military settings in which an espionage or military campaign could be run, along with lots of ideas for single adventures and events to use either in a wartime campaign or even as side excursions within a more conventional spy game.

The first battleground to be investigated is Afghanistan. The chapter opens with a description of the geography and terrain – which would have been vastly enhanced by a map of the area – and then a brief but reasonably accurate account of recent history since the 1970s, when the indigenous government was replaced by one supported by the Soviet Union. While there is rarely such a thing as a true 'government' in Afghanistan, with most of the land controlled by warlords loyal only to themselves, throughout recent history, the major powers have done covert battle by choosing and supporting sides, providing plenty of opportunities should you choose to run an historical game. There are a couple of really nasty ideas for how things might have gone really 'pear shaped' and propelled the world into the aftermath scenario that is dealt with in the penultimate chapter, and a fairly straightforward cave-clearance adventure that pits the characters, as Soviet Spetznaz forces, against a mujahadeen stronghold.

Next up is Bosnia, another part of the world that has spent most of the 20th century in conflict and continues in similar mode into this century. As in the previous chapter, this account begins with the geography and history of the region, culminating in more detailed notes on events during the 1990s. The various factions involved are described and the chapter ends with a mission in which the players, as SAS soldiers, are sent to raid a Serb-held village (rather confusingly, the mission brief is provided as 'Option # 1' although there aren't any others!).

The following chapter describes a seething maelstrom of revolution and drug wars, Central and South America. After a brief overview, focus settles on Colombia with a US presence ostensibly to counter the drug trade, but also bolstering the current government against left-wing insurgents before moving on to brief descriptions of the 1982 Falklands War, when British forces fought to expel Argentinean invaders, and the incident in Grenada the following year, when US troops intervened to quell a Marxist-led coup. There are also notes on Nicaragua and Panama. Again, unless you are a good geographer, you'll probably be running for an atlas to check where all these places are – a general map of the region would have helped greatly. In many ways, this part of the world may be the one best suited to those who want to run espionage games against a background of international conflict, as there is a wealth of opportunity for fact-finding missions and undercover support (or hindrance) of warring factions. Several of the wonderful collection of adventure seeds provided takes advantage of this, and there are other small-scale patrol missions ideal for a small group of characters operating on their own for those wishing a more military game. The full-blown mission provided is set in Colombia, with the agents pitted against a US 'advisor' who has gone rogue and set up as a warlord in his own right.

There is a slight change in pace for the next chapter, which visits Vietnam. Here, possibly one of the times the Cold War came closest to turning 'hot' as the capitalist and communist ideologies warred by proxy in the jungles and plains of Vietnam, new styles of warfare developed as conventional strengths of numerical superiority and more advanced technology proved insufficient. There's a lot of scope for groups who want to go historical, with espionage and covert missions galore as well as more conventional military patrolling. The scenario provided is rather thin, a downed aircraft with an experimental bomb aboard needs to be retrieved, but all you have to work with is a hilltop base and a few Viet Cong after the same objective.

The final 'setting' chapter looks at potential end-of-the-world situations. The basic premise is that an outbreak of a particular virulent influenza virus reaches epidemic proportions, and triggers internal unrest and international incidents that rapidly escalate to nuclear exchanges. The result is a devastated planet with about one-quarter of its former population scrabbling to survive. You can also weave in various 'flash-point' incidents detailed in the preceding setting chapters, or use them as the main basis for the disaster the world has suffered. While most of the material assumes that the catastrophes have already happened and the agents are now attempting to survive and prosper during the aftermath, it could also be interesting to run a campaign in which things are falling apart around their ears. The provided mission involves making contact with one of the few surviving Agency field offices… or – as for once the 'Option 1' is not the only version presented – it's an office belonging to an enemy organisation and the agents can make a hostile take-over instead.

The book rounds off with a 'New Rules' chapter, which primarily deals with concepts necessary for running a long-term campaign without much resupply – be it trips behind enemy lines in any setting or the survival image of the last setting. However many of the rules, such as those providing a more realistic view of injury and recovery and the ones for poisons and weapons of mass destruction, could be adopted by GCs running games in any setting who want greater realism and truly scary effects when their agents are wounded or encounter Bad Guys who are happy to throw nuclear devices or deadly diseases at them. There’s also a section on having a 'battle in the background' – while recognising that the focus of a role-playing game is going to be the individual players there will be occasions when using material from this book that a group of agents may find themselves surrounded by a larger-scale combat, and provides some incidental events that may befall them (snipers, incoming stray mortar rounds and the like).

The rules should be approached with some caution, as it is possible to turn the whole thing into a die-rolling exercise rather than playing out actions such as scavenging for supplies. On the other hand, if your priorities are such that you'd rather not waste game-time on any particular aspect, you have the option of using the rules in a mechanical manner and getting on with what you want to do during a play session.

Overall, the book gives a good overview and some excellent starting-points for running a different sort of spy game than hitherto presented in the main ('Silver') Spycraft books, one in which combat and violence provides a constant background. I feel that anyone wanting to run a campaign in any of the settings will need to do quite a bit of research into the localities and likely incidents before they will be able to begin; and may also benefit from accessing other RPG material that has looked in more detail at the area of interest – for example Holistic Games's Real Life Roleplaying books on Afghanistan and Colombia, or Palladium Books' Recon if you are heading for Vietnam.

This product gives some excellent ideas for broadening the scope of a Spycraft game from pure espionage into small-unit military operations and wartime spying, and provides good starting points for several campaigns.

The main drawback is that there are no maps! Even a map-freak like myself doesn't have every single nation's detailed layout at their fingertips – and even if you don't want to research the area further you are going to need to get maps covering the region in which you set your game.

I am always a bit wary of attempts to mix role-playing – a very individual activity, where each player has one character and you rarely get hierarchical command structures within the group – and the broader scope of a full-blown war situation, but this offering from AEG manages to create the right balance: a backdrop of a war situation against which teams of player-character agents or special forces operatives will be able to operate in a more conventional role-playing manner.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Classic Spycraft: Battlegrounds
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The Big Score
by Scott S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/07/2008 15:13:38
This is a very good system for the Spycraft system. It is great for campaigns.

Been using the Cash and Carry system for a few weeks now. It works well in my campaign. It makes more sense and it is fun to see the greed in your agents. I made 1 change to the purchase of abilities to $100K * the new stat point you are buying.

Should give it a try if you are running a campaign.

S

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Big Score
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Spycraft 2.0 Rulebook - Second Printing
by Justin M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/25/2008 23:45:28
A simply fantastic book, with great rules, but beyond that: GREAT IDEAS for running any spy/military/modern game. As a treasure trove of ideas, knowledge, gear, it can't be beat.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Spycraft 2.0 Rulebook - Second Printing
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Hanukkah Havoc
by Abraham E. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/23/2008 21:04:23
Without a doubt, this was the most unfortunate purchase I've evr made (to date). The plot line is reed thin and would insult a six year old's intelligence (ask my children!), the characters are right out of some smarmy c-level (or worse) wnnabe James Bond flick, and the setting bears no relationship to reality.

The only good thing about this game is the price, though it troubles me that I used paper and toner for the loser.

Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
Hanukkah Havoc
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Classic Spycraft: 1960s Decade Book
by Louis P. J. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/17/2008 07:20:13
The best espionage book ever created to make the 1960s Cold War spy genre come alive. Even if you play D20 Modern and not Spycraft this book is incredibly useful. Don't miss on picking it up.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Classic Spycraft: 1960s Decade Book
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