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DCS
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Other comments left for this publisher:
20 Encounters (The City Watch)
by Darryl J. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/15/2014 16:53:06
First, this is a nice little product. You are getting 4 pages of encounters with the City Watch and 8 pages of ads or blank.
The content is very nice. A quick 1-5 initial encounters with the watch. Then 20 much more in depth encounters. To echo an other reviewer, all of these could become plot points
While this is titled Encounters with the City Watch, very easily this could be Encounters with the Police. A few require reworking, but all provide good, interesting brushes with the local law.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
20 Encounters (The City Watch)
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Light Without Shadow, Blade Without Edge (Pathfinder Edition)
by Michael V. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/09/2014 06:23:59
Suffice it to say that I was pleasantly surprised to discover "Light Without Shadow, Blade Without Edge." This Pathfinder sourcebook from DCS — a publisher perhaps best know for its FUDGE materials — provides very good value for the price and contains a large adventure/mini-campaign that starts off in a very routine way and then expands into something far beyond what the players could likely have ever imagined.

Notable features of this adventure by appropriately named author DM Fitzgerald include neat setup, good adventure flow, and clean writing. It is also thoroughly synopsized and outlined at the beginning, which helps with effectively using it. One of the many small nice things I appreciated about "Light Without Shadow, Blade Without Edge" were the evocative section titles, which include "The Caravan," "A Plague of Ages," "Fortress of Prisoners," "A Fine Vintage," "Some Things Are Missing," and "The Dance of Death." The adventure also includes convenient italicized sections of text that the game master can either read to players or paraphrase when describing particular areas or encounters. There are also lots of maps (although most of these, while clean and useful, are not as visually stimulating as what might be considered typical in RPG products).

There are, indeed, a few things that would have made this book somewhat more appealing, to include having a cover attached to the PDF and more art, custom or otherwise, throughout. It would be unreasonable to fault a publication too much for not including something it is not charging for, however, and as much as I would have enjoyed some of these additional visual elements their absence in no way harms the quality of the adventure and are not held against the rating it is receiving.

All in all, "Light Without Shadow, Blade Without Edge" is worth taking a look at and using the next time you need a fun and interesting Pathfinder adventure.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Light Without Shadow, Blade Without Edge (Pathfinder Edition)
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20 Encounters (The City Watch)
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/08/2014 10:56:25
A useful little collection of events involving the City Watch to use at intervals when the party is visiting any settlement large enough to have regular Watch patrols of some kind. Many of the encounters could be developed into complete mini-adventures, or have ramifications that repeat for as long as they stay in town (or even if they come back again).

The work begins with a straightforward 'Encounter Chart' which makes use of several D6 rolls to determine what the Watchmen the party meets are doing - anything from asking questions to demanding something. Each chart has a subchart, so if you roll that they are asking questions you roll again to determine what the questions are about. There is also a table to determine what happens if the characters cannot or will not provide what the Watch are after

If your initial roll is a 6, there are 20 more detailed encounters. These are the real fun elements and more likely to develop into side-adventures of their own.

Naturally, you can choose rather than roll dice, and make the encounter a planned event rather than a random one if that suits your needs better. Most parties are at least wary of the authorities so the potential for some fun is always there...

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
20 Encounters (The City Watch)
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20 Road Encounters (Prisoners)
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 09/20/2013 10:12:47
Only THREE pages of the 23 pages of the PDF are actually 'Prisoner' road encounters (the rest being title pages, and a LOT of advertisements for other DCS product), but the 20 options provided are actually quite good.

Basically, when travelling on a reasonably good-quality road, the party meets a group of armed men escorting a cage wagon. The 20 options are variations - from encountering the wagon upside down in a ditch with whatever was in it already escaped to seeing someone they know behind bars - but each could provide at least a side-adventure if not take the whole campaign off in a different direction.

These are merely ideas, you will have to add in your own game mechanics and other details (and thus this product is not just for Pathfinder GMs!) but these ideas are interesting and thought-provoking. I'm starting to wonder when any of my groups will be in an appropriate situation for that wagon to come rolling into view.

A few spelling mistakes (it's an ANGEL not an ANGLE...) which a spot of proofreading would have caught, but otherwise a useful resource if you want to spice up the next journey your party makes.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
20 Road Encounters (Prisoners)
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20 Road Encounters (Tinkers, Tramps and Thieves)
by Nigel S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/25/2013 05:25:55
The booklet is actually one encounter with 20 options. You meet a burley man putting on a wheel of a wagon on the roadside and take it from there. Disappointing.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
20 Road Encounters (Tinkers, Tramps and Thieves)
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DCS Ship Bundle [BUNDLE]
by John M G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/31/2013 07:21:51
These deckplans are very low quality and mostly useless. Save your money and spend it on higher quality deckplans like Future Armada.

Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
DCS Ship Bundle [BUNDLE]
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Publisher Reply:
John I'm sorry you didn't enjoy my product email me at dmavalyn@yahoo.com along with the product and date you purchased and I will give you credit for another purchase. Best David
DCS Core rules
by Hamilton R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/05/2012 18:38:30
DCS: what can I say that is accurate and yet fair? (This is harder than it looks.) In one sentence, DCS looks like someone typed notes about a home-brew system and thought it was so good that it could stand on just the notation form of presentation. This PDF lacks a layout, lacks art, and lacks cohesion. If you are good at putting puzzles together, and if you want to give 5x the patience to deciphering the easy yet confusing rule set, then you MIGHT enjoy this game. However, there is not enough "new" or "sizzle" here to warrant the amount of time it would take to fix it. Even at under $2, in my opinion, this is a "miss". Perhaps with a little more TLC and thoughtfulness, DCS could come into its own.

Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
DCS Core rules
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Dead Things (Zombie Horror Board Game)
by Chris J. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/10/2012 07:27:12
I regret giving this such a low rating, as the basic idea is not bad at all. The execution, however, is very poor. The rules are marked by repeated misspellings, grammatical mistakes, and sentence fragments. This is not necessarily fatal, although it detracts from the presentation over-all, but in this case it produces a lack of clarity as well. Several rules appear to have been omitted entirely: reference is made to the humans having weapons, but the only information about them is on the "character cards", and that consists only of the range and how many are killed. When are they used? Are they used instead of what must be hand-to-hand combat (it's never really explained)? The pistol is listed as killing "2". Which 2? Must they be close together, or can it be any 2 zombies in range? And why is the range only 5 squares? An automobile on the map is 3 squares long, so a pistol's range is less than 2 car lengths? And with regard to hand-to-hand combat, what happens if a human moves into a square which is adjacent to more than 1 zombie? Do they all die or only 1? If only 1, does the human automatically suffer hits from the other(s) the next zombie turn? Conversely, what happens if a zombie moves next to more than 1 human at the same time? All of these errors could have been avoided with proofreading and testing. As an introduction to their zombie games this ought to have been a freebie; I definitely regret having spent $2 on it.

Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
Dead Things (Zombie Horror Board Game)
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Publisher Reply:
Chris Thank you for your comments. You will notice that we have issued an errata to cover your questions. I hope that helps and your enjoy Dead Things. If you still have questions please feel free to drop me a line and I'll answer them and make the product stronger. If your still unsatisfied let me know and I'll comp your for another product or refund your money. Best David
Dead Things (Zombie Horror Board Game)
by Alexander L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/20/2012 06:40:29
Originally published at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2012/01/20/tabletop-review-dead-th-
ings/

Zombies. We know them – we love them, and try as we might, we can’t escape them. Movies, TV, comics, books, video games, board games, CCGs – the undead menace is everywhere. And, once again, they pop up in board game form in Dead Things.

Developed by DM Fitzgerald and published by DCS, Dead Things is an easy to set up and quick to play board game (that you have to cut out and set up yourself, nothing bad, just making you aware) that pits two to four players against a field of ravenous zombies, and gives them one option – escape with your lives. Yes – lives; this isn’t a case of “first to the finish line wins it all”. No sir, every human has to escape, because if so much as one of you dies – it’s game over, man, game over.

The game follows a fairly standard turn rotation – humans move, attack if they can, each zombie moves towards the nearest character, attack if they can; repeat until finish. The only difference between humans and zombies (besides the sheer, sometimes overwhelming number of zombies) is the fact that humans get to move three squares to zombies one. There is no set direction to follow for either side – just get from the start to the finish however you can.

When it comes to killing and/or destroying, once again, the advantage falls to the humans – while the zombies get a single energy point before they are destroyed, the humans get four “luck chits” which gives them four chances to get attacked before they die (taking the game with them). This may seem a little overbalanced to you, but since the sides measure four (maximum) humans vs. upwards of sixteen zombies, it does even up – especially when you realise that not everyone will get through the game with all four luck chits intact. This luck, however, does regenerate at the end of a turn, which should lead to some strategic play from players if they get hit with a run of real life bad luck.

Now, while the game itself can make for a fun and frantic way to kill half an hour or so, the physical layout of the game (at least of the copy I am reviewing) is rife with spelling and grammar errors. This is nothing that a run with a spellcheck can’t fix, but the errors do serve to make the overall presentation look quite unprofessional.

Fixable errors aside, Dead Things seems like an amusing enough diversion – it’s not something that you’ll pull out again and again, but it seems good enough for a couple of quick games here and there.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Dead Things (Zombie Horror Board Game)
by Salvatore M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/31/2011 21:01:30
This item is my first purchase on Drive Through, so I'll try my best :).

This is a cooperative board game, simulating a group of modern day people escaping the zombie apocalypse through a parking lot. The game is pretty simple, easy to learn and fun to play. It comes with cards and tokens which you can print out.

The Pros: The game is fun, entertaining and unique. The system is easy to learn, makes sense and is enjoyable. I played it a few times with my regular gaming group and it was fun. I liked the cooperative aspect of the game. It was pretty light-hearted.

The Cons: The only issue I had with the game was the print out tokens. Some of the lines were missing and made it hard to cut them out. I had more fun when I substituted figures for the tokens.

Despite this minor flaw, I would definitely recommend the game to anyone who wants a quick, unique, zombie fighting experience!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
DCS Core rules
by Erathoniel W. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 04/24/2011 22:40:35
DCS shows some promise, and at least has a decent system, but it shows a lack of depth. For one, there's a lot of stuff that's way too terse, and there's also some stuff that's not terse at all.

Having absolutely no art except the cover in the whole thirty pages wouldn't bother me so much if the typesetting were different, but it feels almost "military typewriter"esque while using plain Times New Roman font, which isn't too hard for reading, but does sorta underwhelm. There's a lot of stuff that's left hanging.

My advice to the authors would be to go back through this and revise it, putting in some typesetting, a stock photo page background (or even just modifying the text and using a program like Scribus and putting a .svg with a neutral background design made in Inkscape, which would be free and simple) put in there.

Ultimately, I like the idea that I feel this was trying to convey, but I feel that it failed to convey it well, and there are too many ambiguities. I recognize that an all-genre system presents some challenges, but there is too much ambiguity when it comes to these (lowest denomination of coins means a lot potentially - pennies don't go far).

All in all, it gets a three for having the ideas of a product with great potential carried out halfway.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
DCS Core rules
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