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Mythic Minis 31: Feats of Acrobatics
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/29/2015 15:48:31
An Endzeitgeist.com review

All right, you know the deal - 3 pages - 1 page front cover, 1 page SRD, 1 page content, let's go!



-Cartwheel Dodge: Your movement below 1/2 base movement does not provoke AoOs, any excess movement of up to your movement rate does. Use mythic power to take an ally along for the ride at the cost of 1/2 your speed. See this is the level of awesomeness I love to see in this series!



-Disorienting maneuver: +1/2 mythic tier to acrobatics checks to move through enemy squares. Also increase bonuses granted. Okay, I guess.



-Duck and Cover: Better bonuses, also depending on shield type, and use it even without adjacent allies. Nice.



-Sidestep: You do not have to remain in the threatened area of an adversary when sidestepping. Additionally, sidestep as an immediate action within the threatened area for a bonus to AC. More uses per round for mythic power. Cool!



-Improved Sidestep: Withdraw as an immediate action when an opponent misses you. + dodge bonus; for mythic power, move 2x movement rate.



-Landing Roll: Stand up as part of the immediate action, provoke no AoOs while doing so for mythic power. Alternatively, move half movement rate before falling prone. Power slide, anyone? Nice!



-Passing Tricks: Feint as a free action rather than as a swift one. Use mythic power to feint opponents against which your acrobatics check failed regarding moving through their squares.



-Swap Places: Allies may move as free action when swapping, enable allies that don't have the feat to use it as an immediate action; this can be executed as a swift action. use mythic power to decrease this action economy-wise to a free action each. Complex, tactical, hard to get right, awesome!



-Underfoot: Numerical escalation; decrease size-bonuses against your movement and use mythic power to keep moving even after an AoO, but not through an opponent's square. Nice!



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, I noticed no significant glitches. Layout adheres to Legendary Games' 2-column full color standard and the pdf has no bookmarks, but needs none at this length.



Tork Shaw and Jason Nelson manage to do it this time around - the magic that the best of Mythic Minis-files exude does suffuse each and every feat herein -not one is a straight, boring numerical escalation. They are complex and utilize complex stratagems to deliver new tactical options that are glorious indeed. One of the best Mythic Minis to date and an easy 5 stars + seal of approval recommendation!

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Mythic Minis 31: Feats of Acrobatics
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Mythic Minis 30: Mythic Martial Arts VI
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/27/2015 13:57:32
An Endzeitgeist.com review

All right, you know the deal - 2 pages - 1 page front cover, 1 page SRD, 2 pages content (double the usual!), let's go!



-Djinni Style: +1/2 mythic tier elemental fist uses and icnreased damage output with them. Bypass resistance, immunity and partially hardness etc. when using elemental fist or Djinni Style-feat attacks with mythic power.



-Djinni Spin: Increase damage output and temporarily penalize ranged attacks against you. Creatures of any size may be pushed away 5 feet (or staggered) and non-mythic creatures receive no benefits regarding this, even if they make the save. Nice.



-Djinni Spirit: Higher electricity resistance and enter the style reflexively. Similar movement-causing trick to Djinni Spin, plus clad yourself in a defensive electricity-damage causing sheathe that may also deafen adversaries.



-Efreeti Style: Like Djinni Style, but with regards to fire; Also use mythic power to temporarily increase reach by +5 feet.



-Efreeti Stance: More fire resistance and reflexive entering of the style; has a typo that confuses mythic tier with mythic power - you can expend mythic POWER to receive temporary immunity to fire. (Expending a tier would be a steep cost indeed!) Has a defensive sheathe like Djinni Spirit, just fire-themed and causing the target to catch on fire and potentially be dazzled.



-Efreeti Touch: Add mythic tier to damage and add a nausea-causing fog cloud to your Efreeti Touch. Awesome!



-Janni Style: No penalty to AC when charging, decrease atk-bonus of flanking creatures against you. Use mythic power to freely charge through allies and make as many turns as you want while charging. Now this is cool!



-Janni Rush: +mythic tier to acrobatics checks while executing Janni Rush. Expend mythic power for + 5 x tier to jump checks and when also charging, add mythic tier as a damage bonus that multiplies in crits. Pretty badass!



-Janni Tempest: Trips targets as a swift action, bull rushes them as a move action or executes a maneuver that works as both bull rush and trip as a standard action...which makes no sense. An attack is usually already at least a standard action, so in order to qualify here, one has to hit with an AoO in the round before one's turn. Problem 1: You can't expend the required actions when executing AoOs...so next turn? Problem 2: Do bonuses to one of the combat maneuvers (trip or bull rush) apply to the check? Do bonuses stack (e.g. bonus to trip + bonus to bull rush?); Using mythic power, you can execute one as a free action or the combined maneuver that doesn't work as a swift action. Cool idea, needs clarification.



-Marid Style: As Djinni Style for cold energy; Extend reach by 5 foot, for unarmed attacks only, via mythic power.



-Mardi Spirit: Defensive sheathe that entangles, add fatiguing hypothermia to elemental fist instead of movement; other than that, a cold-themed Djinni Spirit.



-Marid Coldsnap: Increased damage output and add grease-effect to the coldsnap. Creatures falling prone take cold damage and those remaining in the area also take damage. Creatures damaged become entangled. powerful and nasty - nice!



-Shaitan Style: Acid-themed version of the Djinni Style.



-Shaitan Skin: Acid-themed copy of the X Spirit-feat with chance for causing the sickened condition via the reflexive sheathe.



-Shaitan Earthblast: Increase damage output and turn the area into difficult terrain; Creatures that fail their save are knocked prone. Cool!



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are good; while I noticed minor glitches and a couple of the hyperlinks on the first page have a different font size, nothing too bad. Layout adheres to Legendary Games' 2-column full color standard and the pdf has no bookmarks, but needs none at this length.



I'm not a fan of elemental-themed class options unless they do something different for each element, rendering them more than reskins of the same ability. I've read too many elemental groups of abilities that boil down to "as the one with fire, but with acid" - and this pdf does suffer from this issue, at least partially. That being said, Jason Nelson does add some unique options to each of the styles and there *are* differences, even in the cloned abilities, which is neat indeed. I am honestly somewhat torn here and have probably spent too much time contemplating the final rating for such a short pdf - while the combined maneuver bonus-glitch is somewhat annoying, it is also part of the most interesting style-tree herein. The elemental-themed benefits are pretty similar, yes, but they also tend to bring something unique to the respective styles. In the end, I'm going to settle on a final verdict of a solid 4 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Mythic Minis 30: Mythic Martial Arts VI
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Mythic Magic: Campaign Setting Spells
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/23/2015 06:56:52
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of the Mythic Magic-series clocks in at 52 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page SRD, 4 pages of hyperlinked ToC, 2 pages of introduction, 1 page advertisement, 1 page back cover, leaving us with a massive 41 pages of content, so let's take a look, shall we?



So, what does this book cover? well, obviously not spells from one big hardcover, but instead spells found in: Animal Archive, Demon Hunter & Dragon Slayer Handbook, Distant Worlds, Faction Guide, Inner Sea Gods, Inner Sea Magic, Inner Sea World Guide, Mythic origins, People of the Sand (& stars) and the rival guide as well as the osirion sourcebook. (The new one, not the 3.X Player's sourcebook).



Now I can't cover every spell herein without bloating the book. So I'll give you a selection. Additionally, I should mention that I do not endorse all spells mythified - indeed, I do consider some of the books from which the base-material for the mythic spells herein not particularly well-balanced. This will have no impact whatsoever on my analysis of the mythic spells herein - I am taking them completely on their own ground. To help orientation regarding source, concise superscript abbreviations help the reader's orientation. As always, if you do not have the books this is based on - fret not, for the spells herein tend to show up on the respective SRDs and sites like the useful archives of nethys. Got all of that? All right, then let's dive in!



The anti-summoning shield, for example, can have its summon-failure chance enhanced by 5% x mythic tier and, as an augment, be cast as an immediate action. Rolling craft twice per day when utilizing arcane reinforcements also can be considered a nice trick up one's sleeve - crafting two items at once can be pretty powerful, especially when used for magical items. Of course, plenty of spells deliver solidly scaling numerical escalations based on mythic tier and mythic power, but that is a given at this point in the series. More interesting, at least to me, would be enhancements like Baphomet's blessing now also granting the powerful charge ability and immunity to maze-spells.



When a mythic version of a monster or spell manages to actually render a base version more flavorful, more exciting by expanding the very concept of the base version into something more unique - that is when mythic rules shine in my book. From a rules-perspective pretty impressive would be Blade Snare -with increased benefits, interactions with non mythic creatures and weapons etc., the base version is beautiful. While the nitpicky guy in me wants to complain about a missing minus-sign in the augment-section of the spell, the option to maintain the snared weapon and even snare 1/2 mythic tier weapons at once for 2 mythic power makes for a pretty damn neat option.



Terrain-control via Brittle Portal, instant mythic mummification via canopic conversion and curse based control as an augment to the creation of such mummies make for rather iconic options that can be used for narrative purposes as well - not only do mummies freed from such a control gain free will back, they also receive a rather nasty buff. Can I hear mummy-revenant crossovers approaching? Yes, I can.

Channel vigor's flexibility is also pretty nice, with unique effects depending on the limbs into which you channel the effect. Other modifications are small, but still flavorful - adding blightburn sickness to cosmic rays? Heck yes! Discharging dazzling flashes to blind adversaries would also be a rather neat option. Diverse additional options, both in the regular mythic spell's text and the augment option of deadeye's arrow also provide some neat bonuses and added condition-penalties. While everyone who regularly follows my reviews knows that I'm not a big fan of detect spells, at least detect demons receives a pretty unique augment that turn demonic auras clearly visible, helping against foes shrouded in deceptive magic et al.



The defensive excellent enclosure is also pretty interesting in its concise interaction with other spells - the various effects of mythic geniekind also fit thematically seamlessly and organically within the context of the base spell while increasing its potency by means of added spell-like abilities depending on the geniekind chosen. The increased incremental control of fractions of heal and harm also can be considered a pretty cool way of tackling the base spell's concept and making it more flexible. Now this is a very personal preference, but the augment to make the mythic ghoul pack summoned by the spell of the same name subject to haste fit thematically very well within the frame of my own conceptualization of ghouls.



The low gravity options added to the cool gravity sphere should also be mentioned. Now personally, I consider the temporary dexterity penalties imposed by the mythic gravity well slightly less interesting than the concept deserves, but that may just be me really liking. Now perhaps it's due to my favorite in-game card-game being Tarokka or due to the superb "Harrowing" module by Crystal Frasier, but the spell never clicked with me and the relatively conservative card-discarding/numerical escalation of the mythic variant, alas did not change that. Now where things turn interesting once again would be with imbue with flight - the option to utilize mythic power to make objects of huge, gargantuan and colossal size to fly, including the option of sharing the mythic power required, ritual-style, between characters. It's a small thing, but a glorious one that resonates well with quite a bunch of cool fantasy tropes.



Interplanetary teleport now does feature several benefits for its augmented version, helping you survive in less than hospitable environments. Orchid's Drop now allows for the free allocation between regular and ability score healing - pretty sweet. Speaking of pretty sweet changes - shared sacrifice not only has its casting time decreased, it also does not end with the target moving outside of the area of effect, instead being suppressed to kick in once the target is in range again. Siphon spell also receives a nice upgrade that lets you roll twice on dispel checks and continues until you have siphoned a minimum amount of spell levels, with the high-level augment allowing you to ignore the cap at the significant investiture of mythic power - cool! Spawn Calling is also rather epic - why not call the tarrasque or another spawn of Rovagug instead of the Star-spawn? Summon the tarrasque. Yeah. Awesome. In a nice bit of synergy, summon accuser ties in with Mythic Monsters: Devils, but also provides a nice alternative. Sustaining Legend feels a bit strong, with healing and condition negation/decrease added to targets using mythic power in any shape way or form, but that may be me.



More deadly teleport trap may be nice, but transfer tattoo is imho more interesting - you can essentially store an inoperable tattoo with this for some time - can you see the narrative potential? "Your task is to bring the tattoo of power to the missing grand master..." Face theft via transplant visage has also not been this nice for a long time... Well, that came out wrong...



Vision of the Beast Mother's mythic version makes followers of Lamashtu much more fearful...why, you ask? Well, what about sending other spells along with the nightmare? Yep, really, really nasty and once again sporting quite an array of cool story-telling options.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are good, though quite a few minor typos and various superscripts that have not been superscripted slightly mar an otherwise well-edited book. The pdf adheres to legendary Games' two-column full-color standard and sports numerous gorgeous full-color artworks. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience, though oddly, once again, we have additional out of order bookmarks in the beginning, this time duplications of two spell-bookmarks. Since this does not impede functionality in any way, I will not hold that against the pdf.



Okay, after having reviewed 6 Mythic Magic-pdfs by now, I can somewhat fathom how Jason Nelson must have felt: While design is fun, doing so many mythic spells might also be considered one thing: exhausting. This must have been serious *work* - that being said, I can see another thing about this pdf: In spite of the vast amount of mythic spells before these, there still are simply unique tricks herein. A lot of them, actually. More so than I expected to find herein.

While one can see that, unlike in the great mythic magic installment for the APG, this is the work of one designer, the job Legendary Games' chief has done is not only thorough, it is more varied and interesting than one would expect. When it would have been easy to just phone in augments to spells like detect demons or duplicate and recolor spells à la "works like this, but with acid"; when formulaic numerical escalations would have been the easier route, this instead goes the extra mile by providing unique little tidbits to enhance the flavor of the spells. Not all are winners, but in the face of this many spells, that should be no surprise; the quote of cool and imaginative spells is definitely much higher than I anticipated, though, and thus, this can be considered a superb offering. While slightly below the superb APG-installment, this still is one of the best of the all-but-required mythic magic-pdfs; my review will hence clock in at a final verdict of 5 stars + seal of approval, in spite of the small glitches here and there.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Mythic Magic: Campaign Setting Spells
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Mythic Minis 29: Feats of Wrestling
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/21/2015 03:21:10
An Endzeitgeist.com review

All right, you know the deal - 3 pages - 1 page front cover, 1 page SRD, 1 page content, let's go!



-Body Shield: Increased cover bonus by mythic tier and use mythic power to use body shield with multiple attacks per round.



-Bonebreaker: Add crippling citical-effect to the feat and cause fatigue versus non-mythic adversaries.



-Chokehold: Has a nasty typo - it should eliminate the penalty for use against larger opponents, not eliminate a non-existing penalty versus smaller opponents. Also add lethal damage to pinned foes.



-Felling Escape: Add mythic tier to escape attempt, plus reroll if you use mythic power. Additionally, add trip attempt as either free or swift action, latter with mythic rank or tier to bonus.



-Gang Up: Extend expertise bonus to allies threatening the same target and help 1/2 mythic tier allies with one aid another. Additionally, receive a bonus to CMB if multiple allies threaten an enemy.



-Jawbreaker: Treat damaged mouth as having the broken condition, can use ki and mythic power instead of stunning fist. Pretty awesome!



-Neckbreaker: Makes penalty optional, taking it adds damage-boost and mythic pwoer temporarily paralyzes the target. Can use mythic power and ki instead of stunning fist uses. Again, pretty awesome!

-Pinning Rend: 1d4 Str, Dex or Con damage onn pinned foes...OUCH!



-Under and Over: Use the feat reflexively if an opponent fails to grapple an ally while being threatened. Additionally, add entangled condition temporarily to target subjected to feat. neat!

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, I noticed no significant glitches. Layout adheres to Legendary Games' 2-column full color standard and the pdf has no bookmarks, but needs none at this length.



This one caught me by surprise - I expected this to be boring and it wasn't - the effects provided by Jason Nelson and Tork Shaw are diverse, the -breaker-feats are cool and the tactical options this provides are neat. That being said, the Chokehold-glitch is pretty nasty and weighs heavily in a pdf of this brevity. hence, my final verdict will clock in at 4.5 stars, rounded down to 4 for the purpose of this platform.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Mythic Minis 29: Feats of Wrestling
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Islands of Plunder: Tarin's Crown
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/19/2015 15:39:42
An Endzeitgeist.com review

All right, this installment of the "Islands of Plunder"-series is 28 pages long, 1 page front cover, 2 pages editorial/how to use, 1 page ToC, 1 page introduction, 1 page SRD, 2 pages of advertisement, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 19 pages of content, so let's take a look!



Wait, before we go into the details - what is this series about? Well, essentially, the Islands of Plunder-sub-series is a part of expansions intended for the Skull & Shackles AP, providing sidetreks etc. on an island per island base - they can essentially be considered island-focused mini-adventures that work just as well within the context of a Freeport campaign, Razor Coast or Savage Tide - if it's remotely pirate/island-themed, these will work - and probably beyond that, but that I'll take a look at on a case by case basis.



In this case, should you wish to plug this into the AP, situate it between adventure #2 and #3; Its intended PC level of 6 makes it predisposed for early use in RC. It should be noted that the module contains handy scaling suggestions to make the module appropriate for levels 5 and 7.



Hence, since this is an adventure-review, the following contains SPOILERS. Potential players are strongly advised to jump to the conclusion.



Still here? All right! The deadly island once known as "the Crown" has been developed into the base of the dread pirate Red Skewer Tarin - this notorious pirate seems to have stolen the notorious Pirates Queen's Pearl. Worse the man has obviously refused to face up to his deeds and even an embargo of the island has so far yielded no results - the man refuses to leave his siege weapon-equipped tower. His paranoia evident, he has even exiled his first mate and a bunch of his erstwhile crew, so infiltrating his hide-out will not be easy - whether by combat or parley with Tarin's erstwhile subordinates, it's up to the PCs on how they want to handle navigating into the sheltered bay and reach the tower without being pelted to death by the catapults. On the nitpicky side - the man in charge of the catapults has no Knowledge (engineering) or Siege Engineer-feat, which means the targeting check is off - BAB +4, Int-mod +3,+6 for firing at the same spots, -4 for not being proficient with the weapon; which would mean +9, not +8, without range-increment penalties. I may be missing something, but yeah. That being said, this does not impede the functionality of the module and probably is just me noticing a minor flaw.

If the first response of the PCs was to enter the jungle and trek through this green hell, good luck - deadly plant predators roam the jungles - vegepygmies, assassin vines and dangerous mold all prosper on the island. Worse, some of the aforementioned vines are even toxic!



Infiltrating the tower and defeating Tarin, his remaining crewmates and his navigator can result in the PCs inheriting the deadly island and the burden of the artifact - and all the people who want it! The pearl turns out to be a pretty unique and cool reward for overcoming the solidly designed adversaries.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch, I noticed no significant glitches. Layout adheres to a drop-dead gorgeous 2-column full-color standard and the pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience. Each named NPC receives his/her own artwork, which is awesome. Even better, both island and fortress come in lavishly drawn full color maps that also sport player-friendly maps to use as handouts - kudos to the cartographer! The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.



Matt Goodall and Geoffrey Roy have crafted a cool little sidetrek with a unique reward, a neat, dangerous fluff and build-wise, the use of multiclassing and archetypes help make the adversaries memorable. This is a production-value-wise glorious sidetrek for the small price and a thematically fitting sandbox that is easy to run and generally, I did enjoy the trip to Tarin's Crown. That being said, I do wish the dangerous island had more hazards and deadly adversaries for the PCs to face, a tad bit more unique options - perhaps deadly pollen, plant-based haunts, something like that to increase the mood setting before facing off with the main antagonist. Especially the cool defenses of the tower could have used a more pronounced chance to shine. That being said, consider this me complaining at a very high level. My final verdict will clock in at 4.5 stars, rounded up to 5 due to the awesome production values.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Islands of Plunder: Tarin's Crown
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Mythic Minis 27: Feats of the Monastic Master
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/15/2015 06:37:57
An Endzeitgeist.com review

All right, you know the deal - 3 pages - 1 page front cover, 1 page SRD, 1 page content, let's go!



-Cloud Step: Air walk full slow fall distance, remain aloft via ki. COOL!



-Cockatrice Strike: Use as a standard action, petrify non-mythic creatures on any hit.



-Crusader's Flurry: Expend channel energy to increase potency of flurry of blows damage, also +atk when expending mythic power. Damn cool, though this can make you a pretty fearsome shredder. In the hands of the right player, this may be very nasty, even for a mythic campaign.



-Deny Death: Use mythic power instead of ki to stabilize and get + number of ki points remaining as a bonus to saves versus death effects. I really like the aesthetics of this feat - the less life energy, the more susceptible to death effects - reminds me of a great many masters and how they died in WuXia movies. Two thumbs up!



-Domain Strike: Use it as a free action or with +tier bonus to cleric level to determine its effects. Solid, but boring. Beware: If your campaign deviates greatly from the "2 levels equal roughly 1 mythic tier" convention, this may be broken for you.



-Hex Strike: Same as domain strike, just for hexes; same caveat applies.



-Ki Stand: No more AoO; for ki and/or mythic power, you can also move when standing up. Nice flexibility increase!



-Monastic Staff: Temporarily make your staff ki focused as per the property and increase its potency via mythic tier.



-Quarterstaff Master: Better 1h your quarterstaff and potentially temporarily break the +5 limit on enchantment via mythic power. Not a big fan of the latter, though it helps keep the weapon relevant.



-Revelation Strike: Same as domain strike, for revelations.



-School Strike: Same as domain strike, for arcane schools.



-Spider Step: Like cloud step, only for spider step.



-Touch of Serenity: Better efficiency versus non-mythic targets, use mythic power to use it as a touch attack; can be used more than once per round, including in a flurry. Solid.



-Tripping Twirl: Better trip; If you're also a magus and follow trip with spellstrike, you receive +4 to overcome SR. *Generally* pretty awesome and I love the class-specific bonus, though I do think the bonus should scale. That being said, formatting-wise, the additional benefit would usually be reserved to a "Special:" - line analogue to the non-mythic feat.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are good, I noticed no significant glitches. Layout adheres to Legendary Games' 2-column full color standard and the pdf has no bookmarks, but needs none at this length.



Tork Shaw and Jason Nelson provide quite a bunch of feats herein - this mythic mini is pretty much chock full. That being said, some feats feel slightly less inspired to me than in regular mythic minis - while I love the multiclass feat tricks in general, and yes, my gripe with them is highly situational, it is a gripe. I love the linking of ki and mythic power and while I do consider crusader's flurry a tad too strong, I am quite sure that for some character out there, this will be just THE feat. All in all, though, these feats are pretty much ranging from solid to awesome and provide quite some flexibility. In the end, I will settle on a final verdict of a solid 3.5 stars, rounded up to 4 - a good pdf for the price point, if not as mind-blowing and tactics-changing as other mythic minis.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Mythic Minis 27: Feats of the Monastic Master
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Mythic Minis 28: Mythic Martial Arts V
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/10/2015 05:36:49
An Endzeitgeist.com review

All right, you know the deal - 3 pages - 1 page front cover, 1 page SRD, 1 page content, let's go!



-Earth Child Style: +1/2 mythic tier to AC versus giants, also as a bonus to ref-save versus just about anything they can hit you with. Use mythic power to enter it reflexively. DAMN cool - adds a whole new dimension to the style!



-Earth Child Binder: Use combat maneuvers regardless of size versus giants, plus add stunning fist to AoOs sans expending it. Stunning Fist also applies to all attacks versus giants, making stun-locking them very much possible. Nice!



-Earth Child Topple: Trip giants into other foes (potentially with maneuver effects that benefit from tripped foe's size!) and use mythic power to add combat maneuver to crits vs. giants. Cool!



-Kirin Style: Higher mythic tier based bonus and faster creature identification. Not much to work with, solid for what the base feat does.



-Kirin Strike: Bonus to creature identification, ignore parts of DR of identified creature. Solid.



-Kirin Path: Take 20 to identify creatures a tier-based number of times per day; Also: Move through threatened squares of identified creatures after executing AoOs - not much to work with, but oh boy, here we get some pretty awesome tactical options. Nice, especially in light of the base feat!



-Snapping Turtle Style: More shield bonus, immediate action + mythic power = even more bonus. Solid numerical escalation.



-Snapping Turtle Shell: Increased penalty to crit confirmation, also apply bonus to ref-saves versus burst effects and negate non mythic crits via mythic power. Nice, since this actually makes dealing with evil clerics much more feasible.



-Snapping Turtle Clutch: No penalty to grapple maneuvers versus foes who attack and miss you, alternatively disarm manufactured weapons; Even cooler: Counter the grab quality via mythic power and a special defensive CMB, potentially reversing the grapple. I'm usually not a fan of competing attack rolls/checks, but for what it's worth, CMB versus atk is bearable. I like using mythic power to counter grapple, but still think that versus foe's CMD would have been the more organic solution.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, I noticed no significant glitches. Layout adheres to Legendary Games' 2-column full color standard and the pdf has no bookmarks, but needs none at this length.



Jason Nelson's take on mythic martial arts is...surprisingly awesome. The Earth Child-feats brim with cool ideas, even the Kirin Style, which I don't particularly like, receives something nice. And while I am loathe to see d20 vs. d20 (plus modifiers, but still) in the Snapping Turtle tree, the overall feats can be considered well-crafted. Since all my gripes boil down to personal preference and in a minor case, rules aesthetics, I can't help but rate this highly - my only true gripe remains beyond the d20 vs. d20-instance in one feat the fact that 2 of the Kirin Style's feats could have used some unique tricks. This is nitpicking at a high level, though, hence my review will clock in at 4.5 stars, rounded up to 5 for the purpose of this platform.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Mythic Minis 28: Mythic Martial Arts V
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Mythic Minis 26: Mythic Martial Arts IV
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/10/2015 05:34:12
An Endzeitgeist.com review

All right, you know the deal - 3 pages - 1 page front cover, 1 page SRD, 1 page content, let's go!



-Monkey Style: no penalties to AC while kneeling/sitting, standing up as swift action or as an immediate action via mythic power.



-Monkey Shine: Enter opponent's space sans stunning fist, but via mythic power; Move opponents via AoOs = 5 x mythic tier ft.. You may elect to not move with the opponent by expending mythic power. Damn cool!



-Monkey Moves: Swift action or mythic power for 5-foot step even if you have moved; additionally, gain up to 1 min climb speed while in the style. Love this design - breadth instead of depth, adding flexibility - kudos!



-Panther Style: Gain + 1/2 mythic tier to atk and damage for unarmed counter strike; use mythic power for dodge bonus. Okay, I guess.



-Panther Parry: If you damage the opponent with your retaliatory attack, use mythic power to negate the attack that caused it. I know what you expect. The EZG anti-counter-ramble. No. Why? Because it's the best parrying take I've seen in quite a while. Alas, it also doesn't work perfectly as written - it probably should be not only a swift action to trigger this, but an immediate action, seeing how the counter attack can also happens on an enemy's turn... Also, this should probably have a time limit for when the retroactive retaliation no longer applies...



-Panther Claw: This one increases the number of retaliatory strikes available; expend mythic power for +atk and damage rolls for retaliatory strikes.



-Tiger Style: Better crit-confirmations and mythic powered str-bleed; neat!



-Tiger Pounce: Spend mythic power as a swift action charge up to 1/2 speed against a target you have hit or maneuver'd since the beginning of your last turn. Nice to keep the pressure on!



-Tiger Claws: Expend your first two unarmed attacks as part of a full attack rather than as a full round action for the attack, leaving you free to utilize further unarmed strikes.



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, I noticed no significant glitches. Layout adheres to Legendary Games' 2-column full color standard and the pdf has no bookmarks, but needs none at this length.



Alistair Rigg's latest martial arts are pretty cool - the takes on the mythic 3 styles are rather original and increase tactical versatility available to martial artists. That being said, panther style's wording does suffer from a slight lost in translation-glitch - the original panther style made an exception for the use of swift actions during a time when it's not your turn, specifically for executing attacks versus foes moving through threatened squares. This caveat (which is an example of sloppy feat design in the first place - that usually would be an immediate action - after all, that's the defining characteristic of an immediate action!) is not extended to the new benefits granted by the mythic versions, who promptly retain the wording and structure. Now this in no way makes the pdf bad; it's only understandable. I still would have liked to see an immediate action caveat as well. Still, the parrying mechanic is solid and manages to somewhat alleviate this gripe. On the other hand, what constitutes a retaliatory strike and what doesn't is not defined and can make this feat-tree confusing. Hence, my final verdict will clock in at 4 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Mythic Minis 26: Mythic Martial Arts IV
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Mythic Magic: Advanced Spells II
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/09/2015 04:57:41
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of the Mythic Magic-series clocks in at 30 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page SRD, 2 pages ToC, 2 pages of introduction, 2 pages of advertisement, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 20 pages of content, so let's take a look!



All right, so, unsurprisingly, this installment of mythic magic once again provides mythic versions for all spells contained within one of Paizo's big hardcovers, this time around the Advanced Races Guide. If the spell is not in the original Mythic Adventures hardcover, rest assured it can be found herein. Now if you're a regular follower of my reviews, you'll know that I consider the ARG a disaster balance-wise, but that thankfully has no bearing on the spells therein and their mythic equivalents, so let's take a look!



As per the standard of this series, we kick off with a list of the mythic spells contained herein in an alphabetical spell-list - as a selection of different spells from a racial book, we actually have mythic spells take a pretty cool turn in that they provide interaction with the abilities of monsters - take the first one Aboleth's Lung, which may be not only augmented to provide swim speed, but also ignore the effects of aboleth mucus? Or Ironbeard, which can be made much more potent both in its defensive and offensive capacities?



No on more of a craftsmanship's perspective, one could for example take a look at Gusting Sphere, which not only has the save changed from negates to half and increased damage, but also adds bull rush and the augment option to affect all creatures in range - yes, this may not be a unique effect, but it radically changes the parameters of an otherwise pretty subpar spell into something different and more versatile - and I'm definitely game for that! Half-blood extraction can be an unpleasant spell regarding its in-game ramifications - the reduced costs via mythic tier and, per augment, mythic power, do offer an interesting point, though: Think of truebloods waging war on the half-bloods/vice-versa; Tales of Symphonia, anyone?



The resistance/immunity-ignoring hellmouth lash is also a pretty nifty version that surpasses the original. Of course, modifications of action economy can be found herein as well, as are mythic power-fueled condition worsening and rendering ghost wolves incorporeal without inconveniencing the rider and e.g. relatively boring damage spells that receive an upgrade via enforcing a miss chance on those hit. On the interesting side, one can also definitely mention fearsome duplicate, which has your ability to maintain it in spite of damage etc. increased for an uncommon, defensive improvement



Speaking of uncommon interactions - linebreaker. That one lets your ally charge through difficult terrain and if the target creature is mythic, it can use its own mythic power to execute a combat maneuver when charging and yes, the potency is greater when cast on yourself. This synergy/combo-potential. Miasmatic mist's sight-blocking new qualities also make for a rather cool tricks. Allowing sacred spaces to be enhanced with light effects, including a potentially dazzling daylight-effect also makes for a thematically fitting enhancement. Speaking through Sentry Skulls (thankfully minus casting/item activation) may be nice, but is not even close to sow thought. This one's mythic version is pretty much an inspiring campaign seed waiting to happen - why? Because it offers a way to make the thoughts you sow contagious, potentially allowing for a module of propaganda warfare and similar uncommon ideas - politics-storylines just got yet another nifty trick to spring upon PCs...



Now not all of the spells reach this abject level of awesome, with e.g. truespeak only netting an additional bonus to cha-based checks due to linguistic familiarity and pleasing diction and a slight DC-increase for language-based tricks, but I guess they can't all be awesome. Sharing and changing the effects of Ward of the Season fluidly makes for another module waiting to happen - if you require an idea there, just drop me a line!



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are generally pretty good, though not perfect: I noticed a couple of typo-level/formatting glitches like e.g. fire trail being once referred to as fie tail. Layout adheres to Legendary Games' two-column full color standard with neat artworks in full color. The pdf comes fully bookmarked, oddly once again with a couple of faulty bookmarks before the proper ones - 4 spells, out of order. They don't impede functionality, though, so no biggie. The pdf comes extensively hyperlinked, with each spell pointing towards its non-mythic version on d20pfsrd.com.



Jason Nelson's latest mythic magic-installment once again can be called a non-optional book. If you use ARG's spells in your mythic campaign, you quite frankly need these. Now while there are some straight, relative solid mechanical progressions versions that indulge in number/power-escalation, the mythic versions herein usually tend to also sport one or two different tactical options - numerical bonuses are boring and these spells, even if they go for that route, tend to add an interesting component to the fray. And then there are the downright inspired ones with combo potential, unique benefits and cool synergies. While not perfect, I always tend to reward creativity and inspired ideas over minor issues - and this book sports that in spades, more so than the mythic magic installment that converted Ultimate Magic. That being said, there are a couple of not so awesome spells herein and the pdf feels slightly, by a margin, less versatile in its takes than the advanced spells-take on the APG, thus missing my seal by a teeny, tiny margin that should not keep you from getting this cool pdf. Final verdict? 5 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Mythic Magic: Advanced Spells II
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Mythic Magic: Ultimate Spells II
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/06/2015 04:41:59
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of the Mythic Magic-series clocks in at 52 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page SRD, 1 page ToC, 2 pages of introduction, 2 pages of advertisement and 1 page back cover, leaving us with 43 pages of content, so let's take a look!



So this would be the fourth installment of Mythic Magic, and, like its predecessors, it tackles one of Paizo's big books and provides mythic versions of all spells not covered in the original Mythic Adventures hardcover - ALL OF THEM. This time around, Ultimate Magic is covered. Now I'm not a fan of the base book. I think that it introduced a lot of power creep and some not so awesome design decisions, but that's for another rant - I love its magus and for the purpose of this review, I'm going to ignore all of that and instead only and exclusively focus on the way in which the spells therein were advanced to mythic levels. Got that? Awesome.



So, as always, we kick off with a massive alphabetical list of the spells herein before diving into the meat of the matter - more mythic spells! As you may be aware, numerical escalations, while part of mythic design, are not necessarily what impresses me, neither does adding conditions - like in the acid spray-spell. However, the spell turns interesting immediately upon the realization that it also duplicates a hydraulic torrent-like crowd-control effect, adding a new tactical component to the spell. Now don't get me wrong - mythic tier bonuses and e.g. new senses (like your choice of darkvision, low-light vision scent, etc.) are solid craftsmanship - but when I can e.g. dismiss my bard's mythic allegro to reroll a ref-save or dex-check, I consider that much more interesting.



If you enjoy using your magic to make anthropomorphic animals, you'll probably also like the option to add in weapon/armor-proficiencies from the get go, but optionally channeling energy via bestow grace of the champion just is more interesting, especially when combined with the mythic power based optional modifications of the spell's numeric parameters. Anti-stealth nettles or blood mist that may be used to detect invisible targets? Heck yeah, why not, especially since their secondary effects thankfully keep them distinct from one another. On the extremely nitpicky end of the spectrum - I love the idea of implanting a suggestion in a construct as part of control construct, but per default, the monster type is immune to mind-influencing effects - while it is clear that the spell is supposed to represent an exception to the rule, the issue remains and should have called for an explicit exception to the rule.



I'd also like to applaud those mythic spells that offer an interesting "insult to injury"-trick - like corrosive consumption, which can, via mythic power, be targeted at once at a creature AND one of its possessions. Making curses hereditary is also a neat option, though I personally prefer legendary curses as pioneered by Rite Publishing for powerful, odd curses, but your mileage may vary - nothing bad about the simple solution presented herein for mayor curses. Now on the plus-side regarding these curses, generating multiple possible triggers for the curse of disgust makes for a more varied and versatile cast - and a more interesting roleplaying device - just contemplate the PCs escorting someone subject to such a curse, with no idea of the potential triggers... Adding a disease to eruptive pustules is downright sadistic and right up my alley, though I wish the spell had included a way to choose the disease by expending mythic power dependent on the disease's severity. Now haunting mists potential for vastly expanded AoE combined with its wis-seeping properties has some massive narrative potential - even though, perhaps that's just the Ravenloft-DM chuckling in me. :)

(No, seriously - mists...roll saves behind screen...have everyone turn undead...PCs kill everyone...effects subside...PCs have massacred xyz, need redemption...if I hadn't pulled that move before, I'd quite probably do it now.)



On the interesting side of things, this time around we can find synergy-effects with spellblights herein alongside environmental-protection interplanetary travel - so your PCs don't die immediately upon jumping to the wrong planet... The mythic Greater Interrogation enables your PC to utilize progressively worse fear upon those unwilling to cooperate until their fear makes lying impossible - provided they are not too frightened to articulate anything... Action economy wise, casting lend judgment as part of initiating a judgment makes for a cool option, especially since you can maintain another judgment than that you have temporarily outsourced to your ally. The greater version is even more brutal - it nets ALL judgments. Yeah. Ouch. Speaking of ouch - Polar Midnight: Three steps decreased lighting conditions, cold damage sans save to negate, dex-drain that can be decreased to only 1 AND icy prison minus air to breathe for anyone who doesn't move. Yeah...that may be a bit much, even for high level mythic magic.



On the iconic side, using mythic primal scream as an immediate action to cancel paralysis and enchantments makes for some flexibility and tactical depth and modifying the size of simulacra also is something I liked to see. Mythic shadowbards can execute outro-style spells that end bardic performances for you and skinsend's mythic upgrade helps render the skin-form more unique in its defensive capabilities. Beyond a spellblight addition, mythic power can now be used to power steal voice fully, as it ought to be - remember Ariel, the little mermaid? Yeah, NOT fun to be mute, especially if the thief can use your voice for all kinds of shenanigans ... That#s the level of awesome I love!



Summons can generally be upgraded via mythic simple templates for solid additional tricks, as are unholy walls of ice and I like the synergy of unholy sword interacting with fiendish boon. Virtuoso performance allows bards, via augment, to potentially maintain 3 (!!!) bardic performances simultaneously. Free action shifts of witness? Now this is investigation gold and something your PCs will love if they tend to favor complex plans and operations as much as mine do!



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are almost top-notch, I noticed so significant glitches. Layout adheres to Legendary Games' two-column full-color standard with most of the artworks being familiar to legendary Games-fans. The pdf comes fully bookmarked with teh spell-list by class oddly at the bottom of the bookmarks and a couple of them listed again after the alphabetical list - since this does not impede the use of the existing bookmarks, no issue. The pdf comes with excessive hyperlinks, though they are not always uniform, with e.g. some spellblights hyperlinked while others aren't - still, generally, a user-friendly, massive book.



All right, I'll just come out and say it - Jason Nelson simply didn't have as much to work with in this book as in Advanced Spells I or Ultimate Spells I - this is not due to incapability by the designer, but rather due to Ultimate Magic simply not doing much that can be considered interesting with its spells - less interesting utility/terrain-control options than in the APG, no concept like e.g. communal spells as in UC to work with. Considering that UM's spells inho more often than not focus on numerical escalation, the amount of variety provided herein is surprising. That being said, the general enhancements provided do, by necessity, more often than in the spells since the first mythic magic, depend on relatively linear progressions of existing capabilities - there's nothing wrong with that, but as a result, I was not utterly blow away by this book - at least not to the extent as its predecessor. That being said, the pdf sports less glitches than the first Ultimate Spells book.



My final verdict will hence clock in at 4.5 stars, rounded up to 5 for the purpose of this platform - with one caveat: If your mythic campaign uses Ultimate Magic, this can be considered a must-buy supplement that closes a vast rules-gap.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Mythic Magic: Ultimate Spells II
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Mythic Magic: Advanced Spells I
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/20/2014 05:43:48
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This massive book clocks in at 64 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page RSD, 2 pages of ToC, 2 pages of introduction, 1 page advertisement, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 55 (!!!) pages of content, so let's take a look!



At this point, I assume you are familiar with the basic premise of the mythic magic-series - essentially, we receive all those delicious spells that are not included in the original Mythic Adventures hardcover in their mythic versions, with each book covering quite a bit of ground - this one taking perhaps THE defining Pathfinder book, the APG. No other book has for me coined a distinct, unique identity for Pathfinder more than the APG - it turned Pathfinder from 3.75 into a proper, truly distinct system.



The pdf kicks off with an alphabetical spell-list - one that is 4 (!!!) pages long. Yeah, that ought to provide some inkling of what to expect here! Well, let's take a look at the very first spell herein, absorbing touch: The mythic version allows you to absorb magic items and via the first augment, even use them while they are absorbed if their powers are continuous and independent of the physical interatcion - i.e. not rope of climbing-abuse; Wands etc. use up twice the charges, making for a cool caveat. On a very nitpicky side, the wording could benefit from having "wand" generalized to encompass staves and other charge-using items.. On the "awesomecake"-side, the second augment allows you to absorb willing or helpless creatures - extractions, rescue missions and kidnappings have just become much more awesome - when a spell allows for new storytelling mechanics, you know you've stumbled across something cool!



Of course, not all different mytic versions receive such a wordy, complex upgrade - there simply is no need. Accelerating all poisons instead of one? Yeah, works! Now alchemical allocation allows you to spit a potion or elixir back into its container without consuming it, but at the cost of 1/2 durations of subsequent sipping from the potion. Like it! Are you commanding a fleet? Alter Winds can be now augmented to affect a radius of one mile...just sayin'...



Add maximized and empowered effects to your extracts also makes for a nice, crunchy upgrade. One of my player's favorites, ant haul, now has mythic tier added to the effective str-score for carrying capacity. Less traightforward, the additional options for metamagic feats provided by arcane concordance deserves special mention - neat! Ball lightning, per se a non-too-interesting spell, via this book, suddenly becomes unique, adding electromagnetic properties for mythic power at 5th level to the array for unique, cool benefits. Speaking of which - Blood Biography is investigation module gold - what is your home, asking for immunities/resistances and information on kin can be gleaned - and that's not where the improved version ends. G-L-O-R-I-O-U-S. If you require inspiration on how to craft a whole module around this spell, drop me a line...



But not all spells tie in with story-telling or simply increase numerical values - there is another class of spells herein that ties in with proper class abilities - take Coward's Lament: Not only does it tie the reset of penalties incurred by the base spell to a will-save, it also increases an inquisitor's judgments in potency by the penalty AND upgrades your bane attacks to greater bane. This level of ability/spell-synergy makes for rather cool combo-potential and further helps set apart exclusive spells for certain classes, increasing the uniqueness-factor of the options available for them. Formerly subpar options like the divine transfer of the paladin have their mythic version increase the potency and thus render the spell as such much more viable, even before the further augmentation - which allows you to breath of life deceased targets - pretty cool and thematically fitting!



Speaking of further distinctions - each element that can be chosen via elemental touch comes with its own distinct additional effects, lending more tactical depth to element selection as well as distinction for different specialists that prefer one element over another. Fester's mechanic, which decreases non-SR healing by 50% + 5% per mythic tier may seem a bit clunky mechanics-wise, but the pretty awesome result makes up for the slightly math intense formula. (I am assuming you can't calculate 55% of your cleric's channel in your head - while I'm pretty good at math like that, I've seen games slowed by formulas like this, so yeah - a slightly less complicated one that increased 2 to 75% and 100% respectively would probably have been more user-friendly...)



On the cool side - what about using mythic power to scry those subject to your follow aura spell? Yes, I can see the vast potential for espionage and similar action here... Flanking with foe to friend'd characters also makes for quite a cool combo that adds a bit of tactical depth to the whole scenario. Action economy also receives some interesting tactical modifications - take frozen note, which allows its maintenance while 5-foot-stepping. Another cool design decision would pertain creature qualities interacting with spells - take e.g. geyser - those creatures with the burn quality hit by it may have their abilities suppressed. Another cool component would be spell-terrain-synergy - adding heavy undergrowth or dense rubble to hide campsite would be just what the doctor ordered! What about selectively greased lily pads that send your foes into the pond, while you and your allies escape?



Purging Finale also is interesting - by ending a bardic performance, a negative condition can be removed - awesome concept and if you like it, might I suggest the maestro class' outros? Eidolon rejuvenation-spells have also been expanded, with options to decrease hit point healing and instead heal negative conditions/ability damage/drain. Rest Eternal also has yet another unique option available - as long as you have the spell prepared, you can utilize mythic power to spontaneously cast it on yourself, preventing you from joining the undead legions, potentially even ignoring the material components! Mythic Slipstream lets you ignore caltrops and similar impediments and can be discharged for a massive tier-dependent movement rate bonus and even mobility-like bonuses.



Applying simple mythic templates to snake staves, while transmute potion to poison allows you to manufacture specific poisons and yes, spit them. Adding immediate action-based retribution-blasts to winds of vengeance? Yes, please!



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting is very good, better than in Ultimate Spells I - while I noticed a couple of minor bolding glitches, nothing particularly serious came up. Layout adheres to Legendary Games' two-column full-color standard and the pdf's artworks are nice, though fans of legendary games may recognize them from previous supplements. The pdf comes excessively bookmarked, though with weirdly a list of a couple of spells before the proper bookmarks in alphabetical order begin - something seems to have gone slightly awry there, though this does not impend functionality. It should be noted that this pdf is excessively hyperlinked to d20pfsrd.com - each and every spell has a link to help you run this - kudos for going the extra mile, also with e.g. terrain peculiarities hyperlinked etc.!



Jason Nelson, Jeff Lee and Morgan Boehringer have crafted a vast array of mythic spell-upgrades for perhaps the most crucial base book among the PFRPG hardcovers released so far - and this book delivers. While there are slightly more numerical-increase mythic adaptations herein than in the last mythic magic-book, that is also due to the significantly higher page-count. Let's cut to the chase - this is absolutely non-optional. If you run a mythic campaign that is not core-rulebook + MA only (and why would you?), there's simply no way past this pdf. Not only are *many* spells downright inspired in their synergy and uncommon improvements, they belong to what amounts to the very basic minimum rulekit one expects - or at least I do, from a campaign. Instead of just delivering a default job, the designers have went above and beyond the first two Mythic Magic-installments to make this book and its spells stand out, feel distinct and most importantly, diversified them. Instead of simply going into the depth, many options herein go into the breadth, enriching the game rather than simply adding numerical escalation.



This is a required book for any mythic campaign; and yes, it has slightly more glitches than I like to see, but no game-breakers - and that, alongside its sheer creativity and breadth, are what makes this stand out. It's not perfect, but for such a straightforward topic as "make mythic spells of all of these", the designers have managed to retain a freshness and playfulness that suffuses these pages and makes the read inspiring - it may not be perfect, but I quite frankly don't care in the face of creativity like this. Final verdict: 5 stars + seal of approval.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Mythic Magic: Advanced Spells I
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Mythic Magic: Ultimate Spells I
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/17/2014 05:20:25
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of the Mythic Magic-series clocks in at 32 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page SRD, 1 page linked ToC (allowing you to jump immediately to the spell you're looking for!), 2 pages introduction, 2 pages of advertisement and 1 page back cover, leaving us with 23 pages of pure content, so let's take a look!



So here we go - Mythic Magic, once again, thanks to Legendary Games' exceedingly successful kickstarter. But what does that mean? Well, as we all know, Paizo makes per se great rules-systems...but the support for them, due to a need to also cater to the core-audience, not always is enough for the discerning gamer - take Mythic Adventures. In it, mythic versions of spells were provided...but not for all spells. Legendary Games, back in the day, embarked on the monumental task of filling that gap, providing mythic versions of all the missing core spells and generating thus essentially an all but required book, core by any standard but name, for any mythic campaign.



Fast forward to this book - and here we receive the take on ALL the missing spells from paizo's Ultimate Combat. And if you recall that book's general innovation regarding spellcasting, you'll remember communal spells, which allow you to split durations between multiple targets. Now the mythic versions of those spells allow you to freely distribute the duration of communal spells - 1 round here, 3 there - no problem. The concise and easy to grasp rules-explanation at the beginning thus allows for a significantly increased flexibility and avoids the very first significant pitfall, while also providing generally valid guidelines to "mythify" your own homebrew communal spells with a nice table of minimum durations per target as determined by spell duration - really neat to not be required to deduce this from the presentation of individual spells - kudos! The feat required for this, including the option to share duration after the spell has been cast makes for damn cool roleplaying - after all, we all can remember one scene or another from literature, movies or games, where the magical/psionic defense of xyz gets stretched thinner and thinner by the amount of people protected.



After an alphabetical list of spells (with hyperlinks for those spells already covered in Mythic Adventures - NICE!) we hence delve into the spells - and immediately notice something: Flexibility. Absorb Toxicity, for example, is improved at 6th and 9th tier, receiving different options to power the spell with mythic power at the respective levels. Now if you expect a lame linear manner of crafting these spells, you'll be surprised - the means with which they have been upgraded are surprisingly diverse.



Let's stick with "A" for now - Adjuring Step receives an increased duration and makes you less prone to AoOs as long as you limit your movement to 5 ft. or less per action, while also providing at 4th tier augment that protects adjacent allies from AoO-provoking for 2 mythic power uses. Abundant Ammunition, on the other hand, extends its effects to a whole area and does not require the expenditure of mythic power to do so. Other spells are significantly modified - adoration receives a sanctuary-like effect built in and also has its bonus increased by mythic tier.
Generally, quite a few spells dramatically change the way they work and can be applied - mythic power that renders air bubbles helpful to other characters, for example - or what about adding a minor buff to a bestowed weapon proficiency? What about a 50% fortification and increased AC-bonus for bullet shields? Or perhaps you want a version of Brow Gasher that does not end when discharged? If Burst of Speed struck you as one-dimensional, +30 ft and the option to augment it to temporarily spring attack and/or even more speed should do the trick. Compel Hostility also deserves an explicit shout-out - adding a 5-ft step to the immediate action is rather cool - after all, its AoE is extended by that range... Speaking of target modification - why not dampen whole ammunition pouches?

Also pretty cool - the option to dismiss Debilitating Portent and have it immediately deal wis-damage. Beyond increased damage capacity of fiery shuriken, a debuff added for adjacent attacking creatures could well save your hide. Now not all of them are perfect - Find Quarry receives an increased AoE, but also allows you to ignore 10 ft. of difficult terrain sans slowing per round. Yes, this is in no way overpowered, but it does practically demand to be gamed into "this is my difficult terrain-ignore enhancer."



It should be noted, though, that hiccups like this generally remain the exception to the rule - and e.g. Hostile Juxtaposition's 5th tier augment for a second switch is tactical gold. What about having your Frost Fall expand each round to further adjacent 5-ft-squares for a kind of cold wildfire? I also am in love with Judgment Light, which features not only a free judgment (not counting against your limit) if cast for the first time, but which also has wildly diverging effects depending on the judgment chosen - damn modular, versatile and awesome! It should also be noted that the spells themselves and their relative power-level have obviously been considered thoroughly while designing these mythic versions, meaning that e.g. the rather powerful litany-spells do not receive a massive flexibility/power-update, just a moderate one as appropriate for mythic characters. I particularly liked the option to dictate one of the non-acting-normal-effects of Litany of Madness - can you see the madman directing the tune of the gibbering fools?



Now there is a reason why not all spells from Ultimate Combat are easily available in my game, with locate weakness being a particular pet-peeve of mine - when crunch replaces legwork and roleplaying, i tend to get annoyed, so it's perhaps due to this gripe that I can't warm to revealing all weaknesses of creatures within 30 ft. AND + tier to confirmation rolls, but that may very well be just me.



Another star would be the mythic Mutagenic Touch, which allows you to retain the effects of a shared mutagen, via mythic power - think "communal mutagen." Now if you can't see the disturbing storytelling potential, allow me to assist you - the augment allows you to add charm person or reckless infatuation to the effect - "Come, my blessed children of the fluid form, and embrace the bliss of my touch..." *shudder* AWESOME! I also consider the fact that Obsidian Flow does not immediately cool something in favor of the spells herein and violating a mythic peacebond is a) hard and b) helps those who'd clobber the offender to his/her senses. I also enjoy the effect that allows you to share the reloading expertise of reloading hands for a less abstract, more physical feel of the pooled reloading effects - as well as rewarding smart tactics à la "Shoot and move to me, my hands will reload for you..:" Both tactically AND fluff-wise more versatile, resinous skin not allows you to produce globs of tanglefoot-like slime or even exude it reflexively. More on the tactically interesting side would be the symbol of striking's increased range and reach and the option to further exchange duration for even more reach for much tighter and versatile battlefield control. Alas, the text does confuse it at one point with a symbol of death, though not in a way that would hamper the understanding of the context. Now with mythic rules providing quite a few tricks to receive percentile negating effects like fortification unerring weapon's option to diminish this immunity makes sense and +1/2 mythic tier to atk, damage, CMB and CMD make your wilderness soldiers more formidable even before extending the command actions for them to also include move actions.

Using mythic power to enchant wreaths of blades and even have them potentially gain special weapon qualities should ensure that you have the right tools for the job.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are good, but not as tight as I've come to expect from legendary Games - I noticed quite a few cut copy paste errors - like the aforementioned glitch with the symbol, communal ant haul referring to air walk and similar minor nuisances. Layout adheres to Legendary Games' two-column full-color standard full of great artworks, though fans of LG will know most from other publications. A layout nitpick - there are some minor bolding glitches here and there and the bracketed tier-denominator for augments for chain of perdition has slipped down a couple of lines. Regarding these, I also noticed a minor layout glitch - they start the letters of "3rd" etc. off as superscript and halfway through the book change that to non-superscript - again, not a serious glitch, but since some people are bound to be annoyed by it... The pdf comes fully bookmarked with an uncommon twist on bookmarks - they are upside down - i.e. the highest bookmarks refer to the last letters in the alphabet. While slightly confusing at first, I actually came to enjoy this, whether it's a glitch or intentional. Why? Because you open the pdf on page 1 and have an easy jump towards the end for a navigation that went fast and well. Slightly annoying, though, would be that e.g. the bookmark to Qualm is not in the right place in the alphabet. The pdf's excessive hyperlinks on the other hand constitute a massive comfort-bonus, especially since they seem to have been properly handcrafted, with no "will"-futures referring to will-saves and similar issues that tend to haunt automatically generated hyperlinks - kudos for going the extra mile.

Jason Nelson and Jonathan H. Keith have accomplished a task herein that I do *NOT* envy them - making this many mythic upgrades of spells is simply a task that requires true passion AND a more than solid work-ethic. Why? Because settling for simple "add + tier bonus"-solutions are pretty rare in this book, instead taking the peculiarities of the respective spells into account for unique, versatile and rewarding modifications that more often than not increase the options of the basic spell in interesting, compelling manners. The general level of aptitude herein is significant and the creativity beyond what I would have expected to find - which is particularly interesting when taking into account how Ultimate Combat's base spells tend to be eyed with some slight skepticism. This pdf should level the playing field more when using them with mythic rules. Now I am not going to judge the base spells per se (since this book is not responsible for them), but rather what has been done with the base spells and that is damn impressive. While a couple of small hiccups and tricks to cheese a tiny minority of the spells are here, that does remain the exception. In conjunction with the slightly more glitchy editing, though, I can't go higher than 4.5 stars, rounded down to 4, though, as much as I'd like to. That being said - if your mythic campaign uses Ultimate Combat's spells, this is a non-optional book and the varied, cool and unique options definitely can be considered well-crafted, with especially the general communal spellcasting framework being absolutely awesome.

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Mythic Magic: Ultimate Spells I
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Horns of the Hunted
by Jason S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/10/2014 16:57:46
This is a really good adventure and if anyone is getting ready to run the Kingmaker AP this short module is the perfect fit. It ties in several of the loose ends of the AP and even has some foreshadowing to events that are soon to come. I only wish that I had picked this up earlier as my crew is about to start book six.

Whatever AP I run next, one of the first stops on my prep list is to go and check out what kind of support material they've put out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Horns of the Hunted
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Ultimate War
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/29/2014 04:09:24
An Endzeitgeist.com review

The third expansion of the kingdom building/mass combat rules presented in Ultimate Campaign, expanded by the very man who wrote the original rules, clocks in at 45 pages, 1 page front cover, 2 pages editorial, 1 page SRD, 1 page ToC, 2 pages on how-to-use/what to expect, 1 page advertisement and 1 page back cover, leaving us with 36 pages of content, so let's take a look!



This supplement kick off by eliminating two of my most serious gripes with the base mass combat rules from Ultimate Campaign. Number one: Ultimate Campaign does not distinguish between ranged and melee capacity, instead subsuming both under the termino umbrellone of OM, Offense Modifier. This resulted potentially in ridiculous scenarios of elven archer beating orc berserkers in melee. Ultimate War gets rid of OM in favor of separate Melee Value and Ranged Values, abbreviated MV and RV. YES!!! Secondly, the hit points as an abstract measurement to determine an army's deceased is replaced with casualties - which can be tracked individually/separately for sub-units etc., allowing much more detailed and finer tactical nuances. Best of all - both allow for easy downscaling back into Ultimate Campaign's base system, if you prefer the simpler take.



Leadership Bonus of a commander is equal to +1 for every full 5 ranks in Profession (Soldier) and high BABs (+6, +11, +16), Wis or Cha modifiers, certain feats etc. can further increase this bonus. The rather rudimentary selection of command boons is also expanded by this supplement - and the boons are great - Battlefield illumination (or making light-conditions worse!), autosupplying itself, con/desecrate battlefields, divine healing or barrages, smoke screens or particular proficiency when deployed against aerial armies - glorious! Have I mentioned the awesome effects of war chants or the option to execute precise, less damaging assaults via surgical strikes? Brilliant!



Speaking of which - combined arms. Where the general army as a base unit type would be the catch-all default, the rules provided herein allow for a finer distinction. Via these rules, armies are made up of units, which in turn can be made up of several divisions. This is analogue to the distinctions between fleet->squadron->ships. The number of soldiers in a unit is the same as the one in the default rules' army. Creating a unit follows, according to these rules, simple steps - you pay and gather them, you assign a commander (with PCs being particularly potent!) - which influences the amount of divisions in a unit a commander can handle - 3+ cha-mod, max 5 divisions can be contained and losing a division penalizes the unit. Each division can take casualties equal to its ACR before being defeated - this concludes that each unit has hit points equal to ACR times 5. Divisions reduced to 0 hp can be healed normally, but additional damage annihilates them. MV and RV are ACR+leadership bonus of the commander, provided the unit is properly equipped. If not all divisions are equipped to execute one type of attack, the overall value suffers - cool!



Morale score is the kingdom's loyalty divided by 20, min 1, max 10 and determines all the psychological components. A default value and advice for using morale sans kingdom building (Kudos!!) can also be found here. Determining overland movement, scouting capacity, camouflage, name and home-base - in 12 easy steps, just about every DM should be able to create an army - on my first try, it took me less than 5 minutes to properly apply these rules and generate a unit - WITH double-checking that I got everything right.

Each army may contain a number of units equal to the general's cha-mod+3, further increased by leadership, certain boons, etc. Battle Phases are influenced by the new distinctions between ranged and melee values - hence, a concise run-down of the phases is provided, thankfully including proper inclusion of not only the new casualties mechanic. It should also be noted that recruiting armies works perfectly in synergy with Ultimate Rulership as well as the base system. Applying simplified combats between aerial and naval ships etc. would also be discussed here. Now I've already mentioned aerial combat and indeed, aerial reconnaissance, altitude levels, visibility, concise effects of different wind strengths - the peculiarities of aerial combat are well addressed in sufficient details - from balloons to flying carpets and floating fortresses, this chapter adds the third dimension to mass combat - war rockets, solar sailors - every companion of the firmaments-using campaign should consider this the way to add mass combat to their arrays - glorious! (Be honest - you always wanted to fight dragons while aboard a war rocket!) And yes, this does provide full DVs, cover, dmg, stall, crash etc. values - and if that doesn't mean anything to you by now, then only because you don't have the pdf before you - the system is ridiculously easy to grasp and concise in its presentation.



Easy to grasp stats for vessels with drift speeds or those being able to climb altitudes, hovering etc. - all here and supplemented further by 12 unique tactics - from soaring sweeps to dogfighting and strafing runs, aerial combat has scarcely been this awesome and tactical! Now, of course this opens a whole new field - i.e. the combat of earthbound units versus airborne assailants - and from options like digging in to using grapnel shots, a whole new dimension, literally, is added to mass combat. Now if that isn't yet enough for you, let's take a look at yet another expansion - the one to the sea. "But wait, EZG," you say "I already have 3 systems for naval combats to choose from and didn't you say that Frog God Games' "Fire as She Bears" was absolutely awesome? Yes, I did, and I still consider the system the best naval combat system available for any d20-iteration. However, we're not talking about skirmishes between a couple of vessels, we're talking about the clash of whole fleets! And for that, well, let's just say that the rules herein apply the same thoroughness to naval warfare as to that in the skies - depth zones (which allow for submarines and magical threats), wind effects and naval units...ask and ye shall find herein. By the way: All you require, once again provided in detail including required buildings to procure them (forgot to mention that regarding aerial units - yes, when used with kingdom-building, required buildings etc. are provided!) alongside massive tables of sample vessels in one handy tome. Want to know the level of detail these rules support - the difficulty of fighting back once your vessel's been sunk may impose a massive penalty, but it doesn't mean that your unit can't take down a hostile ship.

Which also becomes relevant since the system utilizes one unified frame of rules. Why is that important? Let's say a unit of sahuagin on board of a balloon has attacked your galley; You manage to put down the balloon and it crashes into the sea - you can continue playing all levels of combats like that with one single system. Want to play the fantasy-equivalent of the D-Day? Go ahead, these rules have you covered! Now while there is bound to be some overlap with the aerial tactics, I should not fail to mention that naval combat also receives quite an array of unique, naval tactics that add even more options to the fray.



Now sooner or later, assault on fortifications is bound to happen - and if you ever tried to use ultimate combat and campaign in one and the same campaign, you may have noticed some discrepancy there - instead of assuming abstract siege engines to be a part of a given unit, we receive a special, Knowledge (engineering)-and int-based LB to determine how commanders of units of artillery work - which makes MUCH more sense and allows for generals to specifically target these weapons...

Speaking of strategies - the array of ranged and close-quarters siege weaponry and the vast array of associated strategies, from bombardment (e.g. via smoke, plagued corpses, etc...) to infiltration and scatter volleys makes for a superb selection of choices - even before the 7 new magical siege weapons - like apocalypse zombie siege shots, adamantine rams or ooze-siege shots - glorious!



The pdf also comes with a neat index of the tables for quick reference and it should be noted that perfect rules-synergy with Ultimate Campaign, Ultimate Rulership and Ultimate Battle is maintained.



Conclusion:
Editing and formatting are top-notch, I didn't notice any significant glitches. Layout adheres to legendary Games' two-column full-color standard with awesome full-color artworks. The pdf is relatively printer-friendly and comes fully bookmarked for your convenience. The pdf also contains the good type of hyperlink, making the rules presented even easier to grasp.



Jason Nelson took a *long* time making this final piece of the triumvirate of expansions and refinements to Paizo's kingdom building/mass-combat system (which he also wrote, just fyi). It is not a big surprise then, that the resulting books, unfettered from the limitations of page-count and relative simplicity, have been an utter BLAST to read and use. Offering options to get rid of some overly generic simplifications of the base system, the first two books were beyond superb and managed to add so incredibly much to the base systems I never, ever want to play kingdom building and mass combat without their options again.



Now the thing is - Ultimate War was pending and its task was to close the final gaps and cover the true clash of armies, remembering all the small modifications AND refining the base system. I'll make this short:



If you even remotely plan to run mass combat BUY THIS NOW. The additional options, even if you use neither aerial, nor naval or siege combat, are GOLD: The fact that they work perfectly together makes for truly dynamic mass combat. the vast expansion of boons and tactics translate to mass combat that is infinitely more exciting, strategic and ultimately fun. Now it's perhaps due to approximately 15K points of warhammer miniatures in my attic, but I expect some tactical options from a given system and Ultimate War's expansion fits the bill perfectly - indeed, the variance and peculiarities of aerial combat and naval combat allow for a finer gradation in these areas.



The most impressive component of these rules, beyond their modularity and synergy, though, would be the fact that this one system supports not only all those particular special cases, it allows for transparency and overlap between them - ships that can turn aerial? Why not! Cadres of wyrms rising from the waves to take to the skies, then land and wreck havoc among the elven archers?? Go for it, with this book, you can properly portray that - and the dogfight between the draconic assault and the giant eagle riding knights in the air! The assault of the gnomish submersible-riding saboteurs on the siege-weapon bearing frigate. This book is glorious, a must-buy for everyone who considered the base rules of Ultimate Campaign too simple, too rudimentary - with this, you could conceivably play a thoroughly compelling, interesting, strategic CAMPAIGN of warfare - and honestly, I'd probably have a nerdgasm if Legendary Games released a full mass combat-AP using these rules. For now, I have to plot, devise strategies and generate *a lot* of adventure material; I just have resolved to up the emphasis on war in my current campaign!



This book is brilliant, a worthy successor to its stellar companion books, and well worth a final rating of 5 stars + seal of approval + nomination as a candidate for my top ten of 2014. An absolute must-buy-level tome and one that also receive the endzeitgeist essential-tag as one of the must-have tomes for a campaign!

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Ultimate War
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Mythic Monsters: Magical Beasts
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/19/2014 13:30:38
An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of the Mythic Monsters-series clocks in at 28 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page blank inside front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page SRD, 1 page ToC, 2 pages of introduction/how-to use, 2 pages of advertisement, 1 page inside back cover, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 17 pages of content, so let's take a look!



So this time around, we're taking a look at magical beasts - monsters in the truest form and some of the most iconic creatures of our beloved roleplaying game - but before we go into the meat of these beasts, we first receive mythic feats - a lot of them! 10 to be precise, and while some have been released before in Mythic Minis, their inclusion herein helps render the respective creatures more memorable. The Rending Fury tree and Pack Attack, as some of my favorite monster feats for bestial builds receive mythic versions herein.



From the first page of these beasts, you'll notice something - layout has been streamlined - when possible, two creatures now fit on one page, making the pdf more printer-friendly and less blank-space-prone than previous installments of the series - kudos for that! The first page thus is shared by the mythic Basilisk at CR 7/MR 3 and the mythic Behir - the latter lacking the CR-entry in the header. Mythic basilisks receive a damn cool caveat for their petrification - the poisonous blood of the creature can revert it! Behir breath reducing you to 0 Hp now utterly evaporates the unfortunate victim and their constriction is particularly nasty - especially since it can essentially AoE-constrict - glorious. It should also be noted that many creatures herein, including the Behir, receive alternate versions with e.g. the giant template applied or without them, in cases where the template has already been applied in the main statblock.



The CR 9/MR 3 mythic Bulette also receives these two versions - as savage feeding machines, not even mind-influencing effects can calm these beasts and their crushing leaps and magic resistant plates make for a cool protection. CR 8/MR 3 Girallons also receive this dual treatment and are just superb at rending foes apart, being even capable of rending off the heads of creatures - nasty!



Also at CR 8/MR 3, but sans the second version, the Dragonne may induce fatigue with roars and exhale breaths of sleep-inducing gas. Speaking of bad breath - the CR 15/MR 6 mythic Catoblepas has a slay living gaze, a horrible stench AND poison breath.



On the lower ends of the CR-spectrum, we receive Jacklweres at Cr 3/MR 1 receive a sleep aura and more alternate forms - okay, but not on par with the CR 1/MR 1 mythic...stirge. Diseased, able to bloat themselves with negative HP and swarming, these are a great example for low level threats. CR 5/MR 2 Perytons may rip the hearts out of living foes for mythic power and buff itself by flying over the shadow of targets - iconic, cool - two thumbs up!



The CR 6/MR 2 Leucrotta receives a mass suggestion-inducing whisper and they also receive a CR 5/MR 2 Crocotta-servant and the option to easily destroy objects.



The CR 21/MR 9 Thrasfyr enhances the cool tricks they can accomplish with their chains and get in a telepathic bond with a chosen, willing master. Per se, a nice beast, but some slightly more far-out abilities would have been appropriate and nice here. The Ypotryll at CR 18/MR 7 is all about deadly charges that rock the ground, ignores object hardness etc.



This issue's new creature would be the CR 5/MR 2 warpwolf - the nasty relatives of blink dogs, these creatures exist in a constant transplanar-flux that allows them to entangle foes with their innards, use teamwork feats solo and attack from different directions - and yes, that's only the tip of the iceberg. Once in a while, one stumbles over a design that is simply inspired and this is one of them - even among all those canine foes, the warpwolf stands out and puts to shame his hellhound, yeth hound etc. brethren - it's glorious in so many ways, in spite of its relatively low CR - brilliant!



Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are better than in the giants book, though I noticed minor glitches here and there - nothing too serious, though. Layout adheres to legendary Games' two-column full-color standard and is much more compact than usual - less blank space - more printer-friendly: Kudos! The pdf has no bookmarks, though, which constitutes a comfort-detriment.



Jason Nelson, Tom Philips and Alistair Rigg had an interesting task here - amp up these beasts without making them too flexible - that would contradict their bestial nature. Hence, while they do not sport as many unique abilities, those that are here have to count - and oh boy do they count: From the Peryton's proper heartrend to the behir's AoE-constriction (which finally makes this guy distinct) up to the superb and gloriously illustrated warpwolf, these beasts rock hard. The warpwolf in particular is just awesome, the type of critter that makes you light up, even after having read 2 bestiaries before that.



That being said, I still maintain that this time around, oddly, the high-CR-beasts feel a bit blander than usual for Mythic Monsters - when compared to their brethren in the book, their tricks feel more like linear progressions and don't add that much to the critters. This is me complaining at a very high level, though and in conjunction with the missing bookmarks the only reason I'm omitting my seal of approval. My final verdict will be 5 stars - now excuse me, I have to replace a lot of canine, lame foes with warpwolves...

Endzeitgeist out.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Mythic Monsters: Magical Beasts
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