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Anarchs Unbound
by Tom D. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/09/2014 12:25:50
nice reads wel en is nice to play !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!-
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Anarchs Unbound
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Anarchs Unbound Wallpaper
by Tom D. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/09/2014 12:24:49
nice it is good and looks nice !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!-
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Anarchs Unbound Wallpaper
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Demon: The Descent
by Richard B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/07/2014 18:02:08
I have been a long time supporter of White Wolf Products since the inception of the company and assumed the same quality would carry over to the next generation of products, under Onyx Path. I still hold original VTM books from 1991.

I have never received a poorer quality product. While the content, writing and genre are what you expect from authors (the only thing saving this review from 1 star) the horrible condition of the printed product upon arrival is unacceptable for the $50 price tag.

The majority of right hand pages arrived with a huge (1") white band down the center of the page, as though the printer was running out of ink, render each of those pages illegible. The book binding is of low quality and simply via shipping it shows sign of separation.

I can accept with a "standard printing" that the pages will be lighter and not as crisp but in an era where your competitors such as Pathfinder or other independent publishers are presenting books with better binding and glossy pages for $10 dollars cheaper it shows such a poor quality assurance that I question their dedication to your customers.

I would get the PDF and nothing more if this is a representative sample of their product offering.

Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Demon: The Descent
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Exalted: Tale of the Visiting Flare
by Charles P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/02/2014 20:47:57
This was a fun little comic. It was definitely a nice stretch goal for the kickstarter, and introduces some interesting new characters.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Exalted: Tale of the Visiting Flare
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Exalted: Tale of the Visiting Flare
by McIntyre W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/02/2014 12:28:16
I enjoyed this comic. It was not the very best comic of Exalted, but it made a neat introduction to 3rd Edition, and was entertaining besides.

The comic provided a flavorful introduction of the various character types, and showed both total monsters and true heroes. Visiting Flare's yo-yo added a light happy touch to the whole narrative.
It kept with a tradition of protagonists who refer to themselves in the third person.

Too much time was spent laying out the legend of the Sword Priest, distracting from Visiting Flare and the Sidereal(s?). At no point was I offended by the art.

Pretty good, could do better.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
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Convention Book: Void Engineers
by jason l. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/27/2014 17:17:23
One of the best convention books i've read. A big change to the VE, but one some people may love (think space marines/aliens). The concept of 'threat null' is very enticing and just overall awesome.

The in-book fiction is some of the best I've read from WW also.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Convention Book: Void Engineers
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God-Machine Condition Cards
by Eric B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/23/2014 10:04:37
These are very useful, but my main complaint is that all of the conditions related to ephemeral creatures (Urged, Open, Anchor) aren't included.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
God-Machine Condition Cards
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Trinity RPG Quickstart
by Benjamin A. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/11/2014 20:56:52
We tried this out last minute as a substitution on our regular D&D night. We were short some critical characters but still wanted to play something. This was a tone of fun and very easy to pick up!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Trinity RPG Quickstart
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Dark Ages: Darkening Sky
by Adrian S. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 04/09/2014 05:01:53
'Darkening Sky' is the latest in the new line of classic WoD titles. It is good to see this 'lost title' finally in print.

The book covers the eclipse of 1230 AD from five different game lines, and each line has been set in a completely different geographic area. This decision was a pleasant surprise, as the developers have chosen to cast the net across the medieval world so that a wide range of plots can be explored. From an aesthetic standpoint, the book remains true to the designs of the original lines, the art is consistently of a high standard (as we have come to expect from White Wolf), and the editors have been meticulous. At this price point, the book represents excellent value.

The only segment of each chapter that I found of little use was the section on cross-over ideas for each story. Whilst I can understand that the authors aimed to make the book as useful as possible, each story stands well on it's own. Each story is well-situated in its' own line and their strength lies in 'keeping true' to their own line.

The chapters are as follows:

Set in Volga Bulgaria, 'The Evergreen Prison' (Werewolf) deals with an imprisoned spirit against the backdrop of an invading army. The chapter introduces the Stargazers and Uktena to Dark Ages Werewolf, including a range of Gifts and Rites. The Sept is well-realised, and there is plenty of storyteller advice about local cultures to use. Likewise, the plot will keep players on their toes as they need to explore and address very different story needs.

'Accidents and Deliveries' (Fae) moves the lens to the British Isles, with the story focused on ancient grudges and challenging the might of the Church. The story excels through personalising the NPCs. None of the characters charges are simply stats and stereotypes; and the storyteller is given ample tools to make the players actually care about the focus of the story. As with the preceding chapter, this is no simple linear plot, and the characters have a chance to seriously affect the outcome.

'Phantasmagoria' (Inquisitor) - set in Italy - is the high-water mark for this title (which is saying a lot considering the extremely high quality of the writing throughout). Whilst I have never played Inquisitor, this chapter really opened my eyes as to the possibilities for this simply as a single module. The story deals with a range of situations in which regular people have seen the supernatural and reported it to the Church. The characters are dispatched to mediate these difficult situations and the outcome is never a foregone conclusion.

'The Abyss Gazes Back' (Vampire) takes us now to Sevilla into a political story with the fate of a torpored Elder in the mix. It deals heavily with Lasombra mysticism, and draws in the Crimson Curia. As with any good Vampire story, the charm lies in the non-linear nature of story (despite the nature of the events set to unfold) and the depth of character given to the major NPCs.

Lastly, 'Divine Right' (Mage) is set in Jerusalem and is -at it's heart - a story of apotheosis. The religious backdrop of the city (something that has appealed to me since reading 'Jerusalem by Night') is brought to light, and in context the main NPCs' actions will be contentious and heretical. This story, more than any of the others has the potentially to go horribly, horribly wrong.

So, there you have it. Five quality stories in one book. If you're willing to run a series of short stories, it would be possible (and highly enjoyable) to work your way through the book - and the game lines - over the course of a few month. The title comes highly recommended and stands as a testament to the fact that these writers are still able to seamlessly evoke the feeling of the classic WoD, which is highly impressive and appreciated.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Dark Ages: Darkening Sky
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Reap the Whirlwind
by Flames R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 04/08/2014 20:28:28
The first section covers basic character creation and sneaks in a good bit of backstory on vampires in the WoD. It also provides insight valuable to a fist-time storyteller to help set the tone for the adventure and to create a fitting atmosphere. The second section, Into The Void, is the introduction to the adventure. It includes the set-up for the scenario, and offers a selection of the major players in the events about to transpire.

Next is Goodnight, Sweet Prince, offering the details of the first scene in the adventure, in which the player’s characters have been assigned or volunteered for an unpleasant mission. The second part of the adventure, Secrets On The Wind, finds the players discovering their characters have literally opened a Pandora’s Box of chaos through their actions. There are three more sections to the adventure, plus several optional encounters to add a little more flavor. This adventure was previously published in ebook form as Into The Void, about what happens when a power vacuum suddenly opens in Kindred political structure. Very little appears to have changed from that publication to this one.

At once an introductory product and mini rules reboot, RtW includes enough basic information to run an game without knowing the ins and outs of the Storyteller game system. Fans of Vampire: the Requiem will notice a few things have changed; previewing the Blood and Smoke core book due out later this year, combat will be handled a bit differently — particularly damage from attacks — and Vampiric Disciplines have been tweaked and modified.

At 64 pages plus a full-color cover, Reap the Whirlwind is an extremely attractive product. It’s an excellent introduction to the World of Darkness setting and the Vampire corner of it. It’s also a multi-part, self-contained adventure usable in any setting, including White Wolf’s own excellent Chicago and New Orleans setting guides for VtR.

Experienced fans of the World of Darkness may find Reap the Whirlwind interesting because of the changes made to the system. New players will find this book interesting because of the depth of the setting and characterization. Whatever the motivation, I urge players with any interest at all in roleplaying to check out Reap the Whirlwind. It is an excellent introduction to the Vampire setting in particular, and to the World of Darkness in general.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Reap the Whirlwind
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World of Darkness: God-Machine Rules Update
by Carl L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/08/2014 10:34:29
Let's start off with it being free. Always a good thing, or at least not bad. I like the inclusion of a lot of merits, possibly from various other supplements in the WoD lines, I'm not sure. I especially like that Professions from HTV show up, since the focus of the corebooks has been mortals in a messed up world.

I like the notion of letting players define their own trigger points for morality. I like that there is something that it's not just the player doing this, but it also needs to have the ST involved with it as well.

I like the idea of Beats, but just that. I think in actual play it would smack too much of every video game with an "award" for the simplest of "accomplishments". And looking at the number of things can that can award a Beat would pull from gameplay, considering that every scene might have several Beats, but only if a player tries some contrived BS to get the goodies. I also think the cost ratio of Beats to Experiences, and then the various aspects of the character costing a certain number of Experiences is ridiculous. It reminds me of Earthdawn, where you get your attributes, and then that gives you a Step number, and each Step number corresponds to a differing type and/or amount of dice to roll. It also undermines the notion of trying to not have such a linear concept to character advancement. I'd either go with the good ole' XP system, or take the plunge and work up something even a bit more in depth but still try to steer clear of "linear progression". I frankly see nothing wrong with awarding XP and having things with their costs. It's not so much a "If it ain't broke, don't fix it" but more if you are going to do something different actually DO something different.

Some of the Conditions are neat. Some things should have simply been left as Flaws. Or maybe a designation of Positive Conditions and Negative Conditions. I get why some aren't lumped into Merits, as they can be very temporary, but it still seems needlessly... changed. I kind of get the feeling that somebody wanted to essentially make a WoD 5th Ed. but without actually saying that's what it was since it's not even really called WoD 4th Ed.

As for the metaplot, I've never really used any of them. Even when I run Old WoD stuff it's never about that (which ever game it is). I did like the fiction from the original WoD corebook, especially the one that had the God Machine in it. And I also enjoyed what fiction is present in this update. It smacks a touch the Old WoD stuff, especially the Triat from Werewolf rolled in cthulu and a grandfather clock, but the fiction is good and creepy. A lot of my friends did love the old stuff, but they are also probably still playing within said metaplots. Still, good stuff there.

Some one else mentioned the social maneuvering and Opening Doors , and I agree with the assessment that it's needlessly complicated. I get the idea that there should be some way to convince some one to fork over their security pass, or to let you copy those file even though it is illegal to do such, or any number of things that people know they shouldn't allow but are convinced to do so anyway. I just think the whole mess of Doors and crap is trying too hard to be different for the sake of being such, and not actually being any better than making it an extended roll with "x" being successes needed (x being their Resolve, or even Willpower. Something).

I like the idea of changing with Virtues and Vices a bit, but I like the new-old set up better. I didn't mind the 7 Sins and Virtues. I think this new set up is a bit like Natures and Demeanors of Old. They were interesting, but there were just too many of them. Still, if you can not let the process of creating your own individual and unique Virtue and Vice not consume too much time, and what is come up with isn't worded to be a completely BS way of raking in the Willpower, have at it.

Though it seems kinda bitchy, I did like it. It's price tag has a lot to do with that. If I had actually paid money for this one I'd be rather pissed. Still, I like what it offers that I do like, and the rest I can ignore. I was sitting on a solid 3 for this review, but I figure the current price is worth another for a total of 4.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
World of Darkness: God-Machine Rules Update
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World of Darkness Overly Specific Condition Cards
by P. B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/01/2014 22:23:49
These are the sort of things that we needed to see in the so-called God-Machine Chronicle book (called that because that's the title). Why were they left out? Maybe they were too good, too useful, too important? No, it was due to Onyx Path wanting to charge me for them!

Oh wait... I got them for free? Um, maybe I should've given this more than five stars!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
World of Darkness Overly Specific Condition Cards
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The Strix Chronicle Anthology
by Zachary B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/28/2014 09:32:12
Bottom line (at the top), if you want some good vampire fiction where they get scared of the boogiemen, you can't go wrong with The Strix Chronicle Anthology.

It's surprising that the anthology starts so weakly. However, for the price the stories in the latter 2/3 of the book are more than worth it. "Lullay, Lullay" was my absolute favorite, and I would recommend buying this Anthology for that story alone.

The reason this is not 5 stars is not because of the weak stories. I can overlook those for the brilliant pieces that overshadow them. It loses a star because I felt the editor allowed too many Vampire the Requiem Proper Nouns in the anthology with little meaning to the reader. I even know what the Proper Nouns mean (First Estate, Haunt), and I just didn't see them get used very well except in a few cases ("Lullay, Lullay" with Gangrel/Savage and "Second Chance" with Invictus/First Estate).

Overall though this really drives the Strix themes hard, especially in the second half of the Anthology. The stories are very well done in that regard.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
The Strix Chronicle Anthology
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Demon: The Descent
by Jay S. A. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/24/2014 20:56:10
Among the recent releases for the new World of Darkness, Demon is perhaps unique in the sense that you play a supernatural creature that was never human at any point of their history. The Unchained were formerly Angels, agents of the God-Machine, an ancient and unknowable entity whose true scope, nature and motivations are alien to everyone, even the Angels that serve it.

At a crucial point in their time as Angels, the player characters chose to disobey the God-Machine. Whether from pride, anger, love or pity, these Angels fell from the God-Machine, severing their connection in their first act of true independence. This act of free will is what defines the Unchained, and their new fallen state is something that they bear with pride or shame, and how they react to their new existence forms the basis of their Agenda.

The resulting game is an intriguing game of espionage, as the Demons find ways to subvert or destroy the Infrastructure of the God Machine in order to keep their hard-earned independence, while investigating what makes the God-Machine tick in order to keep one step ahead… or to gain an advantage. The player characters have a host of interesting abilities, from being perfect liars to being able to Spoof detection as being anything but a normal person in the presence of supernatural scrutiny. Demons also have access to a remarkable number of Embeds and Exploits, powers that take advantage of loopholes in reality, allowing them to perform specific tricks that can upstage even Mages, but lack the same kind of flexibility.

Interestingly enough, my experience with Demon has been less about horror and more about supernatural espionage. The Demons excel at being able to get into where they’re not allowed, and their ability to shift Cover makes for intriguing roleplaying opportunities, but I can’t help but feel that the players themselves are somewhat divorced from the horror of their actions. Don’t get me wrong, my players were well aware that their characters were involved in some very monstrous activities, but maybe it was the idea that their characters were never human that dulled the sense of shock at the atrocities that they were committing.

Overall, Demon: the Descent is a great game, featuring a protagonist that is truly capable of being an outright monster while fighting opponents that are far more alien and malevolent than they. The powers and abilities of the game are imaginative and interesting, and there’s a whole slew of antagonists that the Demons can contend with. There’s plenty of opportunities to play up espionage tropes, including stories of trying to maintain dual lives, making deals with the enemy and the possibility of double-agents and betrayal within the team. Demon: the Descent is a worthy addition to the new World of Darkness.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Demon: The Descent
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Blood and Smoke: The Strix Chronicle
by Matt G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/22/2014 13:22:41
It's amazing how nearly all of the rule changes are my house rules. I'm thrilled by the better vampire combat system, even if I find the Strix somewhat lackluster after all the hype. It is a solid sting that balances thebest if old and new WoD.
You won't be disappointed.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Blood and Smoke: The Strix Chronicle
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