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Swords Into Plowshares
by Mark G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/20/2014 07:10:54
Swords Into Plowshares is a very useful accessory for rpg games, being a collection of diverse types of enchanted and well-described weapons, complete with histories. My favourite was True Companion, but there were at least half a dozen that could easily be adapted to a campaign. There are multiple authors and illustrators and this was FREE so I'd definitely check this out. It was originally put out for charity, so maybe you could consider donating to one of them as a thank you. There's also a related one called 'Hungry Little Monsters' that I plan to buy (also for charity). Good stuff

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Swords Into Plowshares
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File Off the Serial Numbers
by Michael H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/23/2013 02:23:41
This is an amazing resource for any GM and if you don't have it yet, get it now. Print friendly, easy to absorb and containing more mayhem than a rusty bag of tricks, with this at the table your players are going to be more engaged with the game; period. Whether your gaming group has had their fill of generic thugs and common combatants or not, File Off the Serial Numbers is a sourcebook that you can use in virtually every Pathfinder game (and for that matter, similar d20 systems) you play.
You are doing yourself a disservice if you pass it up.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
File Off the Serial Numbers
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File Off the Serial Numbers
by Louis P. J. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/11/2013 14:49:19
What really makes this book PDF amazing is in as little as two pages, SKR does amazing job creating a toolkit that any GM can use to make NPCs as needed while taking something very familiar and making it see all new, interesting and original. I Love it!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Swords Into Plowshares
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 07/09/2012 16:54:09
I enjoyed the heck out of this one. Lots of interesting magic items and a great cause behind it all.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Swords Into Plowshares
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Darkness Without Form: Secrets of the Mimic
by Kenneth A. C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/07/2012 09:23:33
Mimics are often used in Roleplaying Games, and yet, I don't think I've ever used one . I've met a couple as a player, but somehow they have escaped my gamemastering grasp thus far.

Darkness Without Form (Secrets of the Mimic) was actually one of the first Pathfinder compatible pdfs that I bought and I've read it several times (it ain't that big, merely 24 pages). So... lets see what it contains.

It starts out with a short history of the mimic, which is also a history of the aboleth, as the two are tied in with eachother. It's a nice history, dark and fleshy, yet, I started to get annoyed by the end of it, as it merely paints a picture of the mimics as servants of the aboleths. I would have liked a slightly broader perspective. Perhaps a few escaped their master's grasp and made a 'life' for themselves somewhere else.

Then we get to the section on mimic symbiotes, which are fleshy mimics that capture a host and dominates them. These symbiotes come in two different shapes (templates, actually), the Puppetmaster symbiote and the Warhulk symbiote. I actually like these and could easily see both used in my current campaign setting, both gave me a very alien feel. By the end of this section, we are also presented with two new mimicky monsters, the lair tyrant mimic (a huge mimic that is often tied to a single location over many years... they also tend to bind themselves with other creatures), and mimicling swarm (not a fan of the name, but it is just that, a swarm of diminutive mimics. In the description they are described as coins). I really like the flavor of the lair tyrant and there are three really nice sidebars that will give your game a lot of flavor.

The last thing we get in this small pdf is a short toolbox on how to give mimics a different feel and power level (imagine a flying mimic...) It is easy to use and probably the thing that I liked the most, since it allows you to create mimics of you own that will definitely surprise your players.

Overall, this is a nice book on mimics, if a little singleminded. I remember a short article on the KQ site that painted a very different picture of the mimics and I would have loved a greater variation. In these days, a lot of 3pps tend to publish pdfs that appeal to both GM and players, but beware, this is a "GM's Only" type of book.

I should probably also note that it has excellent artwork and a very nice and easy to read layout. However, because it is so single-minded, I am going to end at 4.5 stars, rounded down for the purpose of this format.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Darkness Without Form: Secrets of the Mimic
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The New Argonauts
by Adam K. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/06/2011 11:58:10
Severly disappointed with this supplement. The HUGE limitations it encompasses on the players are unsurmountable in my opinion. Basically the only option to play is a human fighter, and that's not what I'm playing fantasy games for (this being made for 3.5 edition, it's even lamer in comparison).

You know what I like about the 4th edition's design philosophy? "You don't tell your players what they can't do, you tell them what they can do". This book is about as far from this philosophy as it gets. All the parts focused on gameplay are telling you of limitations you can impose on your players as a DM or, if you're a player, of stuff you can't do. "This amazing stuff about greek mythology? Nah, can't play that." "This? No, neither this." "And this? No, no, no way. Low magic, remember?"
I don't call the setting author made "low magic". I'm calling it "low creativity" and an entirely wrong design philosophy. Such a pity. If only someone made a setting BASED on Greek mythology, as opposed to cramming the actual Greece into bounds of D&D, that'd be awesome. This? Very much no.

Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
The New Argonauts
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The New Argonauts
by James J. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/03/2011 10:23:30
I was pretty disappointed. Free is free, of course, and considering the respectable effort put into organizing this supplement there are certainly things you can glean from it. But even though the author disclaims at the beginning that he is not trying to be historically accurate, he seems more interested in fitting the game to mythic Greece, instead of the other way around.

That's a real shame, because a few small tweaks allow the inclusions of so many more options. You must be a human when satyrs and centaurs could easily be made an option. But the class restrictions are even worse. Even though Orpheus was so good at song that he charmed Hades, Bard is not an acceptable class option. Even though gods frequently bestowed their priests and priestesses with supernatural powers, cleric is not an option. Even though there are multiple studied magic users in Greek mythology, wizard is not an option. Even though there are scores of wild creatures and wild magics in Greek myth, druids are not allowed. Many of these classes need little more than a name change (Bard doesn't even need that) to be compatible in a setting like this. The new class, Hellenic Sorceress, is pretty cool, and really is its own class with its own magic. Other than that, though, your only option is to hit stuff. In a setting where gods walk around freely, think of the fun potential of playing a Priestess of Athena or an Acolyte of Zeus. Sorry, not an option. You're playing a fighter.

I credit this supplement for its detail into culture and geography. Where it's easy to Westernize the setting, the author defends against that by detailing many of the ways that people lived differently in ancient Greece. However, again, he is too rigid. No one wants to play a female character that, while respected, is still supposed to stay in the home.

The author of this supplement was clearly a student and lover of Greek culture. Unfortunately that love seems to overshadow a love for RPGs, and since this is an RPG supplement, that should take the higher priority.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Darkness Without Form: Secrets of the Mimic
by Shane O. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/10/2009 15:02:25
Ecology articles are a classic staple of the world’s most popular fantasy role-playing game. Of those, I think that perhaps the best ones are those that explain not just the life-cycles and thought processes of their featured creature, but go one step further in tying a creature in with another in an unexpected way. For example, I once read an ecology about the phantom fungus (a rather silly creature by itself) that made it a part of the fungal order controlled by none other than the mi-go. That knocked my socks off. It’s that same kind of re-examining that Darkness Without Form: Secrets of the Mimic attempts to evoke.

A short PDF at twenty-four pages, Darkness Without Form is quite artistic. Having not only full bookmarks, each page has a fairly elaborate pair of borders along the top and bottom, looking like swirling masses of protoplasm. Several interior illustrations, both in color and black and white, also adorn the book. I want to take a moment to call out a great kudos on the artist of the black and white interior pieces, which really wowed me – such unpresuming, realistic drawings of such monstrous freaks was quite spooky! Of course, so much artwork means that you might have a bit of a time printing this book out. The lack of a printer-friendly version is lamentable.

The book opens with a large section of flavor text explaining how aboleths created the original proto-mimics in an effort to be able to move more freely on dry land. After they eventually succeeded (with a sidebar giving a template for an aboleth in a “mimic suit”), they then turned to outfitting their slaves in mimic flesh so as to make them more powerful and easier to control. The second section of the book thus covers the ecology and habits of these two mimic suits, which are templates meant for humanoids and grant great power, but at a high price.

It’s only halfway through the book that it ceases to focus on mimic-variants created by aboleths, instead looking at types of mimics that are found when the creatures are left to evolve on their own. The lair mimic tyrant is a “super mimic” that is far larger and stronger than a normal mimic, with a sidebar covering its ultimate evolution. This part of the book was, I thought, truly inspired, because it goes out of its way to describe how to use such a monster, advice which is at the core of any ecology article. This section fires the imagination for how a lair mimic tyrant can be used as an integral NPC in your game, without your PCs ever knowing it! The same can’t quite be said for the mimicling swarm, which is exactly what it sounds like; woe betide the person who just reaches for a pile of coins and finds a swarm of those instead.

The book concludes with a section of variant abilities for a normal mimic, each ability having an adjustment to the creature’s Challenge Rating. There’s also a brief section on ways to use a mimic as a sort of trap in conjunction with other creatures or parts of the environment (you’re screwed, for example, when the support pillar holding up the unstable cavern ceiling is actually a mimic).

Ironically, while this book does a great job examining where mimics come from, and what they can become, there’s little overview of your average, normal mimic. Don’t expect to find a detailed breakdown of a mimic’s goals, psychology, or physiology like in the ecology articles of yesteryear. Of course, that might be a good thing, since it eschews such information in favor of eminently more practical advice for using mimics in your game. If you want to challenge what your PCs think they know about these typical “dungeon dressing” monsters, look no further than Secrets of the Mimic.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Darkness Without Form: Secrets of the Mimic
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Darkness Without Form: Secrets of the Mimic
by Stefan H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/06/2009 10:02:58
As with any good sourcebook, you can take what you want from this and leave the rest alone, but this is a great way to kick jaded old players in the teeth with some unexpected mimic related surprises. It's like one of the best "ecology of" articles taken to its ultimate. A nice addition to a GM's war chest, I had several interesting ideas for lairs and even whole adventures floating around my head within minutes. Great job!!!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The New Argonauts
by Nathan O. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/08/2009 00:52:43
A cool look at the argonauts for d20 3.5 for your D&D game ya and it's free so have fun with it. :]

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The New Argonauts
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Curse of the Moon
by Naomi B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/01/2009 00:44:15
Finally a lycanthrope template that recognises an animal's natural actions! Wolves are pack animals so why are werewolves solo? Bears can be grumpy and dangerous especially if you get between them and food - so look out Goldilocks. And similar interpretations for other weres. This book takes a bit of work and thinking but is much more in line with non villainous roles for weres. Designed for D&D 3.5 but that is fine with me as I don't like the 4th edition.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Curse of the Moon
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Swords Into Plowshares
by JD S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/18/2007 19:33:30
Political activism doesn't exactly mix with gaming, but it was free.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Swords Into Plowshares
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Publisher Reply:
So because you disagree with political activism in gaming (in this case, giving money to a charity that helps people), you gave this book a 3/5 rating? No comments about its content?
Curse of the Moon
by Louis P. J. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/17/2007 16:10:28
A great product that I use to put the fear of god in to several or my players in my D20 Ravenloft game. And the feats we incredibly helpful to make the most dangerous of PCs and NPCs.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Curse of the Moon
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The New Argonauts
by Anton S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/08/2007 13:08:26
Great setting to run a nice low magic setting. Well, low magic compared to most D&D type settings, more like classic Jason and the Argonauts or Clash of the Titans. Goes great with the counter set from Fiery Dragon.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The New Argonauts
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Curse of the Moon
by Jeffrey V. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/16/2007 00:00:00
An interesting take on lycanthropes by an excellent game designer.


LIKED: Clean, excellent layout

DISLIKED: Some original artwork would have been nice

QUALITY: Very Good

VALUE: Very Satisfied


Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Curse of the Moon
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