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Primeval RPG Core Rulebook
por Timothy B. [Cr�tico destacado] Fecha en que fue añadido: 07/09/12 15:45:27
There is an absolute ton to like about this game. First, things first, yes. It is the same system as C7's fantastic Doctor Who game. That end and of itself is enough to merit it a good review. The system is simple and gets out of the way to allow you to just play the game they way you like. Secondly let's talk about the art and layout. Plenty of stills from the series, but the layout is still top notch and the text is easy to read.

So what is Primeval? Well if you have not watched the series in England (or on BBC America here State-side) then you are missing out on some fun. Basic premise: Anomalies in Time are opening up allowing all sorts of creatures from the past and the future to walk through, whether it is a Dodo or gigangantic Giga-Rex. The team at the Anomaly Research Center have to deal with it. Which means of course now YOU have to deal with it. Of course maybe your cast is not with the ARC, instead you could be independent. Frankly I can't wait to run a game with an investigate news team seeking out anomalies to get them on the news or net.

Like many games, you have basic Attributes. In this case six of them that are ranked 1 to 6. These are all point buys, so choose wisely. You also have skills, whit general skills and areas of expertise. You could be great with Technology, but your specialty is Computer Hacking or Surveillance Systems. These are also ranked 1 to 6.

The basic rule is Attribute Skill 2d6 vs. some Target number. Simple as it can get really.

You also have various Good and Bad traits that can be bought. Sometimes these add to your roll, but could subtract from others. These help define who you are.

You character is then topped off with Story Points, which can be used in play.

After all the character creation rules we get a nice bit on Group Creation where you can also buy some Group Traits.

This is followed by the official cast stats including the human adversaries. We also get some tips on playing ARC-related games. This is followed by something completely different and we given tips on how to play a "Dinosaur Hunter" style game. So two campaign models for the price of one.

We get into the basic rules section, including combat and chases. You spend a lot of time running away from things in Primeval. There is a nice overview of gadgets and equipment.

Next up descriptions of the various epochs of time.
And the Monsters. The Monsters of course are the real treat of this book. Plenty of examples are given and advice on how to create your own beastie from the past, or future.

A Gamemastering section is included on how to run the games. Followed by chapters on Adventures and Conspiracies.

A look into the Future is up next. Primeval tends to focus mostly on Dinos, I think because Dinosaurs are cool. But the creatures from the future are also very interesting.

Primeval is a fantastic game that should give a creative GM many, many sessions of adventure. While there is certain emphasis on dinos coming in from the anomalies, there is no reason to limit it to that. What about Neanderthals? or worse a victim of the Black Plague wanders into modern London? The possibilities are endless really.

Now of course I have to mention that the game is compatible with Doctor Who. It opens up an exponentially growing amount of stories when the two games are combined. The game becomes worth it for the dinos alone for Doctor Who, or the creatures in Who for Primeval. Honestly there is no way to go wrong here.

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The One Ring: Words of the Wise
por Dennis S. [Cr�tico destacado] Fecha en que fue añadido: 07/09/12 15:05:17
Words of the Wise is a short, free adventure for The One Ring RPG that is useful for gamers looking to structure their own adventures. This was the adventure ran in Gencon 2011 to showcase the game. It is well organized and concise, with a very narrative feel. Whenever a skill is called for, it is bolded to stand out from the rest of the text, such that it doesn't get lost within the narration prose. The adventure takes characters from a routine hunting trip out to the edges of the Mirkwood, and into a grand domain of the Elves, and finally to a terrible battle at the Woodland Hall. There's a wide variety of interactions possible within the adventure, and it appears overall entertaining for a game of The One Ring. I'm not sure how long the adventure would last you, as it seems very short, but it's a good show of everything The One Ring does as a system, from exploration, to interaction and combat.

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Doctor Who: Adventures in Time and Space
por Robert S. [Cr�tico destacado] Fecha en que fue añadido: 06/27/12 05:27:42
Greetings from the edge of the Medusa Cascade.
Gamers and games draw inspiration from many places, including novels, movies and TV shows. Sometimes that media is adapted into an actual role-playing game. For example, the TV program Smallville actually got an RPG adaptation at one point.
This is the first time I’ve done a review of an RPG adapted from other media…
Right, this week we are reviewing the RPG adaptation of popular British science fiction program, Doctor Who. Specially, Cubicle Seven’s Doctor Who Adventures in Time and Space.
Before diving into the game, it is worth diving into the show.
Doctor Who is a long running British program. It follows a human looking alien, called the Doctor, who travels across time and space in a mostly indestructible vehicle that it larger on the inside than the out – the vehicle is called a TARDIS. In most of his adventures, the Doctor takes along human companions, allies and friends from contemporary Earth.
Although supposedly able to change their appearance to match their environment, the Doctor’s TARDIS is stuck in the form an English Police Call box, or a blue phone booth just for calling the police in the event of an emergency, such as thieves, aliens, or thieving aliens.
A feature of the Doctor’s alien race is if they (he is a Galifreyan) have suffered catastrophic, or otherwise fatal, injuries, their bodies literally regenerated into a new actor and new production crew responsible for presenting the show.
It first aired in the early 1960s and ran, with a few interruptions, from then until the late 1980s, when it seemingly went off the air permanently, aside from a mediocre TV movie in the late 1990s. Fortunately, the BBC – or the British broadcasting Company – brought the program back in a revised format in 2005.
A proverbial line was drawn between the original run of the show, with its piles of backstory and canon, and the new show. At some point between the story depicted in the TV movie and the new series, there was a terrible war across space and time itself, between the Time Lords of Gallifrey and… the Dalak.
-there was a war, we lost-
A result of the war is the Doctor is the last of the Time Lords (aside from his archenemy who periodically appears and is also a Time Lord), and the Doctor’s TARDIS is the last one known to exist. Gallifrey is gone and the Dalak are no longer posed in a position to conquer and exterminate the universe itself.
Or at least the Dalak are mostly no longer posed in a position to conquer and exterminate the universe itself. The Dalak, slightly silly and utterly hateful, are one of the Doctors oldest foes. Newer enemies include the not-all-silly and mysterious Silence, with their eye-patch wearing servants.
Now, the somewhat manic and lonesome Doctor occupies his time on adventures with his friends, as they travel to exotic places, race up and down long hallways and inevitable battle forces of evil. As has been put in the show, he is a madman with a magic box.
Though nominally science fiction it falls into the science fantasy end of the scale – science, time and causality are all treated in a rather wibbly wobbly manner. The program may have started with the intent of it being an education program, it has grown into a show have a merry romp, and highly entertaining style rather than a careful presentation of historical and scientific fact.
For that matter, it is barely a time travel program. Bear with me here for a moment – time travel is as much a vehicle for adventures as the Doctor’s Type 40 TARDIS. It uses time travel to having romping adventures rock and lava monsters in Pompeii and it uses time travel to have romping adventures with cat-nuns in far future New New York. It does not worry about time travel paradoxes any more than it has too.
Doctor Who, as a program carries a distinct aesthetic and tone – if you are a fan of the show, you will presumably seek such things in an RPG adaptation of the same. Honestly, the game does an excellent job of adapting the unique tone and aesthetic of the show.
However, it is not for everyone. Those unfamiliar with the program should watch one of the better episodes from the new run. These include Dalek, The Empty Child, The Girl in the Fireplace, Doomsday and Human Nature. If these episodes are not your thing, then the game will not be your thing. For that matter, watch the opening or pre-credit sequence to the episode When a Good Man Goes to War. If that sequences does not leave you wanting more, then this is not the game for you because the show is not for you.
Adventures in Time and Space is a boxed set – something rare and handled well here. Included in the set are a player’s guide, a game master guide, handouts and character sheets. The handout for gadgets and story point can be cut up. The table of contents for the player’s guide and the game master guide are printed on the back of the books. All the material is full color and features images captured from the current version of the TV show. In terms of composition, it features two columns surrounded by lots of designs and patterns which are busy, but not distractingly so. One problem is that the original character sheets and handouts are bright and pretty, meaning unless you opt for full color copies, they will be muddy looking in the more economical black and white.
The writing is jocular, informal and energetic – again, not distractingly so, though at times is comes close to being a problem or irritating.
Moving on to the mechanics. This is a game where the mechanics and the story suit each other. There is a difference between action, combat and violence. Doctor Who, new and old, features a lot of action relativity little combat or violence. By comparison, Dungeons and Dragons is in close orbit of violence and combat. Rules systems reflect this, where D&D provides a grabs bag of rules with a focus on killing everything killable. The rule set provided by Cubical Seven in this boxed set is focused on fast-talking social situations, fiddling with gadgets, sneaking around and running up and down corridors. Combat is possible, but close to expressly discouraged. In the show itself, the big action sequences appear at the end of a season, rather than at the end of every episode.
There are six attributes, including Awareness, Coordination, Ingenuity, Presence, Resolve, and Strength. Their value ranges from 1 to 6. Traits helps define the attributes and thus the character. Traits come in good and bad and can be thought of as merits or flaws from White Wolf or edges and hindrances from Savage Worlds.
When a roll is called for, the mechanic is simple. The relevant attribute the relevant skill relevant trait 2D6 = result and the result is compared to the target difficulty. If the results matches or exceeds the difficulty, then the task succeeds. (Attribute Skill Trait 2D6 = Result v. Difficulty) This is true for all the roles in the game, the mechanic does not change. So while it requires a little math, it does not require a dice pool, a pair of d6 passed around the table will suffice.
Characters neither possess health levels nor hit points – damage comes off attributes, impacting the characters ability to make successful roles in the future. In D&D, by comparison, a character who lost 99% of their hit points is still fully functional. In Adventures in Space and time, a character that damaged probably could not so much as crawl.
Adventures in Time and Space also features storypoints, or chitties the players can collect and spend to allow themselves to fiddle with scenes, sequences and dice rolls to get a better outcome.
The quick start guide is well executed and handy for giving to all the players at the table, providing a solid starting place for the game.
Enough aliens, menaces and dangerous situations are provided in the set to cover most situations in a game.
An understandable weakness is the game is too devoted to the current version of the show. If you want to run in a different situation, such as before the Great Time War or with a different Time Lord than the Doctor, you will have to hack the contents.
Probably the worst problem for the boxed set is the price – the $60 is understandably a turn off.
However, as presented here, Adventures in Time and Space would serve as a good introduction to role playing games, letting new gamers get used to the ideas in the hobby before moving on to games which are more mechanically challenging. It will still be fun for long time gamers if they also enjoy Doctor Who.
In the end I give Doctor Who, Adventures in Time and Space a 20 on a d20 roll, though I feel that is me rounding things up a bit. Aside from the hardcopy being expensive, the flaws in sound churlish to list – the design of the character sheets will not reproduce well and it is too focused on the current version of the show. However, the strengths vastly out match the flaws, it features a quick system and does a good job of matching the aesthetic and tone of the show.

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Thou Shalt Not Suffer
por Timothy B. [Cr�tico destacado] Fecha en que fue añadido: 06/26/12 14:31:46
Witches and witchcraft for Clockwork & Chivalry. Fairly comprehensive guide, but I think I was looking for more.

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The Dragon In The Smoke
por Timothy B. [Cr�tico destacado] Fecha en que fue añadido: 06/25/12 15:54:28
Another adventure for Victoriana 1st Ed. The set up is very nice and it captures the feel of the game right away.
The adventure itself deals with strange eastern magic and mysticism, missing children and a cursed statute. Plenty of really good plot elements to keep your players guessing.
This adventure also includes some rules on using martial arts.

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The Smoke: 1867 Edition
por Timothy B. [Cr�tico destacado] Fecha en que fue añadido: 06/25/12 15:46:25
This is one of the best Victoriana 1st Ed products. At 128 pages it is a very comprehensive guide to London in 1867.
Granted there is the Victoriana-universe spin on everything, but otherwise it is perfect for use with ANY Victorian era game. It especially works well with the 2nd Edition of the Victoriana game. The book is sans-game stats, so there is no system conversion to worry about, just thematic conversions.

The maps are fantastic and I especially enjoyed the descriptions of all the neighborhoods.
Very good resource indeed.

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The Hounds of Hate, A Penny Dreadful for Victoriana
por Timothy B. [Cr�tico destacado] Fecha en que fue añadido: 06/25/12 15:04:29
What if "Hounds of the Baskervilles" was a true story? Well in the world of Victoriana, it can be!
This is a "Penny Dreadful" or an adventure for Victoriana 1st Edition (aka 1867 Edition).
This adventure though is based more on the old legends of the Black Dog or Old Shuck on the English countryside. As such it is a good adventure for any Victorian era game with a heavy emphasis on magic or the supernatural. One could easily run this under Ghosts of Albion or Cthulhu by Gaslight.

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Doctor Who: Adventures in Time and Space - Tenth Doctor Adventure Book
por Alexander L. [Cr�tico destacado] Fecha en que fue añadido: 06/11/12 06:35:53
Originally posted at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2012/06/11/tabletop-review-doctor--
who-adventures-in-time-and-space-tenth-doctor-adventure-book-
/

Cubicle played it smart and released a free upgrade guide for those who’d purchased the Tenth Doctor box set so you could use that box to play the Eleventh Doctor. They did put out the Adventures Book for the Eleventh Doctor separately, and for those that bought the Eleventh Doctor set, you can also pick up the Tenth Doctor Adventure Book to expand on the book you already have in your set. For people who have the Tenth Doctor’s Box set, steer clear of this, as you already have it. This is exactly the Adventure Book that came in the Tenth Doctor Box Set. For those of you who have the Eleventh Doctor’s RPG set and are looking for more adventure, read on.

At 32 pages, this one is somewhat shorter than the book you get with the Eleventh Doctor set. The one in that set was forty-four pages including the one page for the cover and the rest was all meat. This one is also meat, and doesn’t even have a cover. Granted we’re looking at the PDF version, but it does look a bit odd after the clean look the one in the set had. Another thing that sticks out about this one is the lack of a PDF menu. The Eleventh Doctor set had the main pages all bookmarked and ready to take you anywhere in the document, this one feels very bare bones in that regard. Sure you can add your own bookmarks in, and I recommend it for ease of use, but the other books felt more professional and user-friendly.

Much like the Adventure Book that came with the Eleventh Doctor set, this one has two main fleshed out adventures and a bunch of seeds that need a bit of work to make them usable as an adventure. The first main adventure deals with the Autons and the Nestine and the second with the Judoon, so already you’ve got two main adventures dealing with entirely different Who enemies from the other book you’d have, which is very nice to have in your back pocket as a GM. Variety at the table top is the spice of life. Here’s where it gets interesting. While being shorter, this book offers you 24 more adventure seeds which is more than the one that came with the boxed set. You only had eight seeds with the Eleventh Doctor Adventure Book. Some of these are very short seeds, giving only the briefest of information to start with, others much more. The one I thought was interesting was the inclusion of a trilogy of adventure seeds that you could run separate or linked together which was pretty interesting.

This book definitely has the Tenant era feel to it, which isn’t a bad thing at all. It does seem a little rough to look at as there is a lot more text to this than the other book, but they put more information into it. For the price, if you already have the Eleventh Doctor set, it’s definitely worth picking up just for the extra adventures and seeds. I wish there had been a few more adventures with the main set after looking through how much came with this one. If you have the Eleventh Doctor set and are serious about running more adventures and are short on ideas, this is a must have.

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Doctor Who: Adventures in Time and Space (Eleventh Doctor Edition)
por Alexander L. [Cr�tico destacado] Fecha en que fue añadido: 06/08/12 06:26:47
Originally posted at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2012/06/08/tabletop-review-doctor--
who-adventures-in-time-and-space-eleventh-doctor-edition/

When I got my grubby little paws on this game, I wasn’t sure what to expect. I’ve seen some pretty terrible licensed games and I’ve seen some fantastic ones. I love RPGs, and I’ve been a Doctor Who fan since Christopher Eccleston took on the role for the 2005 restart series. My wife had been trying to convince me to watch the show long before then, but I’m stubborn, and I’d only seen part of an episode of Sylvester McCoy’s run and it was a Dalek episode and I had no idea what was going on. So the 9th Doctor was the perfect in for me. I’ve since picked up the 8th Doctor audio adventures and devoured whatever I could find of the others through episodes and audio dramas, but the 8th has held a special place for me. That’s not to say I don’t like Matt Smith’s take on it, I love it, but each actor brings out a different aspect of the Doctor, and while I do think the Eleventh is fun, let’s face it everyone ends up having “their” Doctor, and the 8th just happens to be mine. But I digress. What you get with this boxed set is a slick looking, well thought out RPG that’s as easily accessible for people who’ve never played an RPG as it is to veterans.

It’s broken down like most boxed sets are, and I got the PDF version so I didn’t get any dice (I already have access to over twenty sets so I’m good), but they do have printouts for the tokens and equipment cards in the PDF. The meat of what you get though is character sheets, a 97 page Player’s Guide, a 164 page GameMaster’s Guide, the 44 page Adventure Book, and a quick start guide. Like the Tenth Doctor’s Boxed Set, the GameMaster’s Guide does double up on information present in the Player’s Guide a bit, but it is nice having them in entirely separate books, even as PDFs.

The Player’s Guide is broken down into 4 chapters, the first giving some very brief but useful information about the Who-verse and roleplaying games. The second very lengthy chapter deals with creating characters and how they fit into the Who-verse, the third is all the rules a player might need to know as far as what will need a roll and what won’t and life and death and timey-whimey bits, and the last chapter is a little more in depth bit on roleplaying games and how it all works. Overall I like the layout and the guide does exactly what it’s supposed to do and introduce players to the universe and things they need to know to be able to play. There are some layout errors in the PDF for this book, re-displaying the same chapters titles from the first chapter all throughout the book along the edge of the pages, but the main chapter page for each chapter is fine. It’s a little thing, but it might make it a bit difficult if you’re not using PDF bookmarks to get where you need to go to quickly.

The Game Master’s Guide has seven chapters to it, but don’t get too excited as three of these are basically slightly expanded chapters from The Player’s Guide, which I mentioned earlier, as the GM would need these as well. If this was a standalone set I’d be more picky about this, but as a boxed set you get everything you need and you don’t have your player’s hogging your book looking up rules and information this way. The first chapter is a very brief intro and a warning that there are, as River would put it, Spoilers ahead if you’re reading and aren’t the GM. Very cute. The second chapter deals with character creation with a few touches here and there the GM might want to know about but player’s might not need. Chapter three delves into the rules with again, more information that the GM will need to know about resolving conflicts, combat and awarding points for player use. Chapter 4 gets into the ins and outs of time travel and is again expanded on what was in the Player’s Guide. Chapter 5 finally gets into stuff we haven’t seen or hasn’t been expanded on, in this case, aliens and monsters. There’s a nice variety of them here, most carried over from the previous Doctor but would run into again and a few new ones. The classic Who aliens and monsters are here as well, at least the big ones anyway. Chapter 6 gives you helpful hints on running a Who game and GMing a session in general and Chapter 7 follows up on that with how to run a single shot story and turn that into a campaign by creating new adventures or using the seeds they’ve provided in the Adventure Book.

The last book in the box is the Adventure Book, another GM only book. This one is broken into three parts, the first two being fully fleshed out adventures, one featuring the Cyber-Men and the other the Daleks, both tying into what’s been going on in the more recent series story-wise since Smith took over as The Doctor. The last section is a selection of adventure seeds. The seeds aren’t fully fleshed out adventures, but give enough information that they can easily be fleshed out by a GM into full blown adventures with a few minutes to a few hours work, depending on how much improvising you can do on the fly. There are 8 adventure seeds to go with the two fully fleshed out adventures giving you ten of them just about ready to go, which is three adventures short of a full series, or two over a series if you’re going by the audio adventures.

Overall I like how the books are written. They get specific when they need to, don’t over complicate when they’re talking about rules and make things pretty clear and concise, something I love in a good gaming book or set. It all feels very much like Matt Smith’s run on the Doctor, the visuals fitting right in instantly. You know which series this was written for and it looks very splashy and clean with that slick feel the new series has had. The main basic rule to determine success is pretty easy to learn and applies to pretty much everything you do in the game. It makes it very fast and easy to play. Character creation is pretty much the same way. This is not an experience based game, but a game based on points, so actually doing something in the story and using your character’s strengths will help your character grow, which is very dependent on the GM as to how fast that happens. If you really want to play fast you can pass out pre-generated characters and hand out the ‘Read This First’ page that has all the information you’d need to really start playing and just go.

As a self-contained box set, the PDF price is very good. This is something I’d pick up for an afternoon or two of fun and the price there is very comparable to a board game that you’d play about the same amount of time and you get to be more inventive. While you could do a campaign with it, and I would love to at some point, it’ll require the right group to do that with. I think one of the better things this does is let you play with or without the Doctor, meaning the GM could step in as the big guy, or you can have a player do it, or you can have them playing as random people who never meet the Doctor and just get sucked along these adventures, or one of my favorites, as Torchwood or UNIT members. I’m not fond of the GM based leveling system. I’ve had too many stingy GMs over the years who don’t like to reward players for doing extraordinary things. The Storyteller and West End Star Wars games used this system and I think if you have a stingy GM you may not have as much fun. With the right group though, this game would be a blast and I’d recommend it easily to any current Doctor Who fan, or even an older fan, as you can just regress the Doctor back to a previous incarnation and run that one instead using the same rules.

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The One Ring™: Adventures over the Edge of the Wild 2011 Edition
por Christopher H. [Cr�tico destacado] Fecha en que fue añadido: 05/05/12 13:42:31
The One Ring is a lovingly crafted, beautifully executed RPG set in J.R.R. Tolkien’s Middle-Earth. Anyone who is a fan of both Middle-Earth and RPGs should find the game compelling, and it’s a good gateway from one love to the other, especially for Tolkien fans who aren’t already gamers.

The TOR core set comes in two books, the Adventurer’s Book (about 190 pp.) and the Loremaster’s Book (around 145 pp.). The Adventurer’s Book contains all the rules for task resolution and character creation, as well as a small selection of pregenerated characters. Each “Player-Hero” is defined statistically by three attributes—Body, Heart, and Wits—plus ratings in Valour, Wisdom, Endurance, and Hope, as well as levels in a selection of eighteen skills. The skills are cleverly arranged into six skill groups, each containing three skills corresponding to the three attributes. For example, the personality skills group includes Awe (linked to Body), Inspire (linked to Heart), and Persuade (linked to Wits). Some of the skills, such as Riddle, might seem a little “corner-case” at first to role-players with experience in other systems, but they fit the setting very well.

Each Player-Hero comes from a specific culture and follows a specific calling, as befits Middle-Earth. Emphasizing cultures rather than races allows the game to easily model differences between, say, the Men of Dale and the Woodmen of the forest. Cultures provide various blessings and proficiencies at character creation and during character advancement. As Player-Heroes advance, they can improve in Wisdom and Valour, and they gain Rewards or Virtues depending on which of Wisdom and Valour they choose to emphasize.

Since most of my role-playing experience is with “roll plus modifiers” systems, it took me just a little while to adjust to TOR’s action resolution system. Player-Heroes can propose “tasks” and Loremasters can require “tests,” but both are resolved the same way: the player rolls a “feat die” (a special d12) and variable number of success dice, comparing the total to a Target Number. TOR does not use character levels, so there’s just one set of TNs to learn. This bringsus the biggest drawback to buying this TOR in PDF form: the game assumes the use of specially-printed dice. The feat die included with the print version ofthe game is numbered 1–10, with the remaining two faces bearing an symbol representing Sauron’s eye (replacing the 11) and a G (for Gandalf) rune (replacing the 12). A roll of “Sauron” is an automatic failure for Player-Heroes, while a roll of “Gandalf” is an auto-success. The success dice are special d6s, with the numbers 1–3 printed in outline and the 6 face bearing an additional symbol, the Tengwar numeral 1. All of the variations have special meanings in judging an action’s success. Combat (which requires tactical decisions, but notprecise tactical positioning or miniatures/counters) is resolved using the same system; armor and other benefits protect you by affecting the opponents’ target numbers.

The Loremaster’s Book provides everything the Loremaster needs to know about creating and running adventures for TOR, including a small selection of monstrous adversaries (with the predictable and appropriate orcs, wolves, and spiders). The default timeline for the Player-Heroes’ adventures begins five years after the Battle of Five Armies, and the default geography is Wilderland (the northern part of Middle-Earth), giving the Loremaster plenty of time and space to create an imaginative Tale of Years without stepping on the toes of the established timeline of the War of the Ring. The Loremaster’s Book closes with an introductory adventure carefully designed to expose players to all of the key mechanics, introduce the Player-Heroes to some famous personages, and help the players appreciate the ethos of Middle-Earth.

I’ll close this somewhat lengthy review with a comment on that final point about the ethos of Midle-Earth. The One Ring beats in perfect time with the heart of Middle-Earth; it wonderfully instantiates Tolkien’s moral vision for Middle-Earth’s inhabitants. The threat of Shadow and the promise of Hope are ever-present. Upon finishing my first read through the PDFs that I received as review copies, I purchased the printed game—a rare occurrence for me. Buy and play The One Ring. You won’t regret it.

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The One Ring™: Adventures over the Edge of the Wild 2011 Edition
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The Mythos Dossiers
por Alexander O. [Cr�tico destacado] Fecha en que fue añadido: 05/05/12 05:40:03
The Mythos Dossiers is an interesting supplement / sourcebook. The presentation and content of the sourcebook to emulate actual files that would be found in the intelligence dossiers. Like the novel, these files are codenamed rather interestingly: BLUE HADES, ANNING BLACK, EQUUS STELLAR, PLUTO KOBOLD, etc. and are more or less consistently used throughout the sourcebook across all 'files', reinforcing the feel of working for a bureaucratic agency dealing with the supernatural.

The formats of the files found in the dossiers are many and varied: there are letters, handwritten and typewritten; there are transcripts of recorded interviews; there are photos that are vague yet suggestive; there are diagrams; there are situation reports and assessments; and so on.

Some of them are quite humorous, such as the BLUE HADES interview; others are terrifying in their implications. Even better, the more files that you read in each dossier, the more you learn about each topic -- players and GMs may end up drawing connections between things that they wouldn't have seen taking each file individually.

GMs can use this sourcebook as inspiration for scenarios and campaigns. They can also hand out entire dossiers grouped by codename to get PCs ready for a scenario tackling that dossier. They can also hand out files piecemeal, allowing the PCs to learn more and more as an adventure or scenario progresses.

I love this sourcebook -- it feels true to both inspirations: the classic Call of Cthulhu handouts and The Laundry novels.

(from my online review at armchairgamer.blogspot.com)

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The One Ring - Tales from Wilderland
por Alexander L. [Cr�tico destacado] Fecha en que fue añadido: 04/29/12 16:12:20
Originally published at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2012/04/27/tabletop-review-the-one-
-ring-tales-from-wilderland/

Tales from Wilderland is the first supplement for Cubicle 7 Entertainment’s recent RPG release The One Ring: Adventures Over the Edge of the Wild and contains 7 adventures that can be played separately or as a series. As of now the PDF is available, but the hard copy should be available in May or June. You can pre-order it at Cubicle 7′s online store.

The Adventures

I like to leave out the exact details of adventures because I think discovery is part of the fun. In case any players read this, don’t worry too much about spoilers.

“Don’t Leave the Path”

The players are traveling around Long Lake when they are stopped by a frantic boy who tells them that his father needs help in the nearby wood. The ensuing meeting is just the beginning of a journey that will take the group through parts of Mirkwood, encountering various characters and dangers as they go. Should they survive, they’ll end up at the Northwest edge of Mirkwood, near the land of the Beornings.

“Of Leaves & Stewed Hobbit”

Despite the basic premise of this story, that a renowned Hobbit chef goes missing, this adventure is action-packed. Goblins, undead, sticky situations, maybe even some cooking, all may lie in wait for the party that goes through this one. In the continued effort to rescue and return Dinodas, a lot can go wrong!

“Kinstrife & Dark Tidings”

The party makes an ominous find along the banks of the river, and seek the aid of Beorn himself to find out how to proceed. It involves a murder, and the party must seek the guilty. In their quest, they come across some twists and turns that may be deadly, and perhaps justice will be served in one way or another.

“Those Who Tarry No Longer”

The group is asked to escort an elven noble, and it would be unwise to decline. The noble is a mysterious, ancient female elf who manages to attract some unwanted attention that the party may have to deal with in…unusual ways.

“A Darkness in the Marshes”

This one is suggested to be played as a sequel to the “Those Who Tarry No Longer”. The companions are tasked with finding the source of an evil that has escaped its bounds. Their journey brings them to a secluded mountain hall and further to an ominous obstacle housing dreadful enemies.

“The Crossings of Celduin”

This scenario starts with a festival, games, and all kinds of merriment. Then something goes wrong, and the one responsible is not to be seen. It’s not as simple as one man doing a misdeed…there is much more evil to come should the party seek him.

“The Watch on the Heath”

This adventure is recommended immediately after “The Crossings of Celduin”, and there are some characters in common. The party is looking for someone, and continues to scour the land for the one responsible for much evil. In their search, they may find some strange things, and some downright terrifying things.

What Do I Think?

This is another great piece of work from Cubicle 7. I wouldn’t expect anything less, especially since The One Ring is a highly visible product and was just released mere months ago. This book of adventures should make any group happy to have plenty of material to run. The adventures are excellent: nuanced, exciting, having variety, etc. Characters will face all kinds of obstacles, using all the skills they can. There are key social encounters, and even more battle.

While I generally lament the over-prominence of combat in RPGs, I also know that it is fun and somehow necessary. I can put on a costume any day and go role-play out in a field somewhere if I wanted, but I can’t kill orcs and cast spells (of course, in The One Ring you can’t cast spells either). My one complaint about the combat scenes is that the primary foes are pretty much orcs and goblins. This is mostly due to the The Lord of the Rings lore, but I do wish there was more variety. There are definitely some special encounters though with some great enemies and neutral parties, but prepare to see your share of orcs.

Each part inside of the adventures is well-written and often contains paragraphs about the different outcomes that can occur, not leaving it up to the GM to make it up on the spot. The feeling of continuity of story is very strong, with some outcome paragraphs describing the long-term effects of the party succeeding or failing. The GM is given options for how to play an NPC, or whether or not to add a twist, or when to introduce an NPC to the party. The book itself (at least, what I see in the PDF) is gorgeous, sharing the style of the core books. The artwork is great, and scattered throughout, sometimes really adding to the visual aspect of understanding locations or people in the adventure.

There is so much to be excited for here, and as long as you like The One Ring in general there is no reason why you wouldn’t like Tales from Wilderland, it’s just excellent, excellent stuff.

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The One Ring - Tales from Wilderland
por Matthew E. [Comprador verificado] Fecha en que fue añadido: 04/24/12 20:35:41
Tales from Wilderland contains seven very well written adventures, each containing different plot elements (escorting, hunting, and rescue stories just to name a few...) Here are the things that make this collection of adventures top notch:

1) Content. There is a huge amount of content here, and the content is of a higher quality than typically found. One hundred sixty pages of well written content by Gareth Hanrahan-- hats off to him for the excellent writing here. He is very creative and reading these adventures has prompted me to check out other works he has written.

2) Design. The book itself is layed out as a "loose" story arc, so a Loremaster can use the material as he/she sees fit. The artistic considerations in the book are quite frankly stunning! Howe, Hodgson, and Jedruszek hit the stratosphere and bring the whole book together with a wonderful atmosphere that perfectly matches the intent of the design.

3) The book stands alone as a wonderful read for any who enjoy Tolkien's works. Gareth has really written with the spirit of Tolkien in mind, and that simply serves to push the book into the ranks of the truly sublime.

Buy this.

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The One Ring - Tales from Wilderland
por Matthew B. [Comprador verificado] Fecha en que fue añadido: 04/20/12 13:01:52
Very pleased with this book. About to commence a TOR campaign with my club and will use some of these adventures after we've played through the adventure in the core book and 'words of the wise'. There are seven adventures in total, with the last 4 being linked by a common antagonist and are of greater difficulty. There is fantastic artwork throughout and the chance for your players to visit iconic locations in Middle Earth and interact with Beorn and Radagast. Looking forward to other releases for TOR in 2012 - highly recommended.

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Doctor Who: Adventures in Time and Space (Eleventh Doctor Edition)
por Rory H. [Comprador verificado] Fecha en que fue añadido: 04/18/12 04:10:04
A much cleaner layout than the previous edition and great to see the write-ups for the 11th Doctor characters. The new character sheet layout is excellent too. For an intro game, or just for fans of the show (which I am), it's near enough perfect.

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