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Gaslight Victorian Fantasy 2nd Edition (OGL Edition)
by Joey M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/28/2014 23:49:59
This book is amazing. I got this book after enjoying the savageworlds version. This is the first OGL book I have read in a long time that could draw me back into running d20. Its a full and complete book nothing else needed to play. This book could easily be used to run all kinds of Victorian as well as modern fantasy. This is what d20 Modern should have been. If I do run any OGL setting this is my new OGL main rule set. So much good in this book. The racial feat trees are just the touch of customization that is missing from a lot of OGL books.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Gaslight Victorian Fantasy 2nd Edition (OGL Edition)
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Swords and Wizardry Field Guide to City of Clocks
by Daniel D. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/07/2014 08:43:01
So I loved the setting of CoC and when I saw a "conversion" of sorts for S&W I jumped. What I got was a little more disappointing. It was only a portion of the S&W rules grafted onto the setting. The inclusion of the magic user class seemed shoe horned in instead of more blended to the setting. The book was advertised as being 88 pages but was actually only 58. That includes the OGL and other filler pages that don't actually have any game content. One of the setting specific races didn't even get the scant rules conversion as the other two. I was hoping for game stats for equipment, NPC write ups or even a bare bones bestiary. In the end the reader is just referred to the S&W core rules for any of that. I do not wish to degrade someone else's work but this feels very incomplete and leaves the GM with the lion's share of converting. At this point I would say this could be a free download or maybe $1-2. Not the same cost as the setting book.

Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Swords and Wizardry Field Guide to City of Clocks
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Publisher Reply:
I would like to address a couple of points, 1) the book was never advertised as being 88 pages, so I have no idea where the reviewer got that information. 2) the book was designed to be grafted onto existing S&W core rules, and not a complete game. However, the comment about the bestiary is a good one and will be added to the book. It will be given as an update to this book, so anyone that purchases this book will get the bestiary free.
Open Core Role Playing System Classic
by Arthur S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/07/2014 01:59:24
It was looking good, until I read the STR chart. How the hell did they derive those numbers from the STR stat? It looks like they pulled numbers out of their ass for levels 1-10. I was hoping to use it for superhuman characters, where I knew how much the character could lift. Their chart maxes out at a dead lift of 880 pounds: how do I extend the STR table for someone of say, a hundred times normal human STR? There is no clear formula for higher STR.
Hell, this isn't a drawback just for 'superhero' games. What if I want to stat out a giant in a Fantasy game? Or a demigod? Would it have really been that hard to come up with an equation?

Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Open Core Role Playing System Classic
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Gaslight Victorian Fantasy 2nd Edition (Savage Worlds Edition)
by Joey M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/17/2014 21:18:25
Any one who knows me knows I love Victorian era mystery and horror. What stands out to me in Gaslight is its information on secret societies and hidden places. Every page gives me ideas for games I would like to run. Again for its size, this product is full of campaign starters. From secret societies pulling strings behind the scenes, to creatures of the night walking the streets of London. Magic, Monsters and Dark agendas. Its everything I could ask for in a Victorian era source book.

As a side note. I started off thinking Gaslight would make a great supplement to PEG's very own Rippers setting. Which I love. Now I feel Rippers would make a great supplement for Gaslight. Gaslight could take Rippers games well beyond the Rippers world. Gaslight has a (in my opinion) better social standings rules than Rippers does as well.

If your a Victorian era fan as I am, I don't think you can go wrong with Gaslight.


Here is my favorite line out of the entire book.
"The head of MI 7 is the
quiet yet brilliant Mycroft
Holmes, elder brother of the
noted detective."
......I'm SOLD!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Gaslight Victorian Fantasy 2nd Edition (Savage Worlds Edition)
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Gaslight Savage Worlds Character Sheet
by Keith B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/08/2013 12:07:26
Nice layout, a must have for that style game, best of luck and keep it savage!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Gaslight Savage Worlds Character Sheet
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Kaiser's Gate Field Manual: Mounts
by David P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/30/2013 10:36:12
This review is for the digest sized physical copy. I'll break the review into two parts: the book and its layout, and the content.

I received the book as a Kickstarter backer and chose to read the print version instead of the PDF. It may be that these comments do not apply to the PDF. First, i thought the type was a bit small; readable, but I would have liked it larger. Second, one of the tables had small type combined with a crinkled paper background that made it unreadable. I was disappointed with that and do not understand the decision to use that background for the table.

The main reason I backed the Kickstarter was to see the Savage Worlds rules for flying mounts. But after reading the book, those rules are not what I like best. In fact, I consider the rules a minor part of what makes this a good book. I most enjoyed the historical details and how the world of Kaiser's Gate differs from our own. A lot of good information is contained in a compact space. I never found the historical information boring or tedious, and wish there had been more. In particular, I liked the references to Serbia, which often seems forgotten in discussions of WWI. Even better, the historical information is presented in a way that naturally suggests adventures to the GM; a number of adventure hooks are included after each section.

In summary, a well done supplement with good historical and rules information. The print version could use better graphic design.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Kaiser's Gate Field Manual: Mounts
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Gaslight Victorian Fantasy 2nd Edition (Savage Worlds Edition)
by Keith (. T. A. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 08/17/2013 19:43:20
As a fan of the Victorian Era, I like this 2nd edition of Gaslight for Savage Worlds. It fits in the traditional SF/Fantasy Victorian mold of Vampires, Beastmen, Wildlings, magic, and the technology that excites Vernians. It works best as a reference as it's thoroughness covers a huge range of topics within it's 80+ pages. My favorite parts were the Important Organizations & Secret Societies and the Reliquaries sections. I would love to see a Victorian "Warehouse 13" plot point campaign inspired by the previously mentioned sections.
The DTRPG product description says it's a Player's Handbook, which is fair but in truth its a good bit more. The inside title page claims "A Victorian Era Fantasy Setting.." which isn't quite true at least in its current layout. I believe with some editing it could be very much closer to a true setting book. Instead of burying the "Making Heroes" on page 31, I'd suggest having a basic setting intro followed quickly by the Making Heroes section, then Worldly Goods, Setting Rules, & Magic, then....have a GM section with all the fun secret organizations, societies, reliquaries, and some basic adventures. Voila! It's a real setting. It's almost all there. There is a reference to a Campaign guide in the description of the Wildlings. I'd love to see that and revised into a(3rd?) new edition and I'd give it that 5th star. As is, it's a good fun basis for a Holmsian, Vernian, or Wellsian adventure! dmb

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Gaslight Victorian Fantasy 2nd Edition (Savage Worlds Edition)
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Publisher Reply:
Thank you so much for your candid review. I appreciate your suggestions and I believe most of them can be worked into a newer version of the book. I think the reference to the "Campaign Guide" is erroneous, and left over from a previous edition and failed to be edited out. A revised version wont come out right away, but thanks to the suggestions you made it has made the "to do" list and it should be soon. Thank you again.
Eldritch Skies
by Brian P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/08/2013 23:23:09
Back when Lovecraft was writing his stories, there wasn't the neat distinction between horror, fantasy, and science fiction that currently exists. It was all kind of shoved together under the label of Weird Fiction, so you get stories like John Carter of Mars psychically transporting himself to Mars, or magic-wielding aliens, or--more topically--Lovecraft's At the Mountains of Madness, which has this quote when referring to the Old Ones:

"Radiates, vegetables, monstrosities, star-spawn - whatever they had been, they were men!"

That's the approach that Eldritch Skies takes, and right from looking at the human/mi-go trade mission on the front cover, you know that this isn't going to be like Call Of Cthulhu, or as I often call it, "The Dunwich Horror: the RPG." Aliens are alien, but they're not innately inimical to humanity, and while you'll never have a human and a mi-go drinking together in a bar after work and complaining about their bosses, it is possible for them to interact and get beneficial results for both parties.

Eldritch Skies actually reminds me a lot of Eclipse Phase. Not because of the specific details--the kind of society Eclipse Phase demonstrates is probably intrinsically destructive and dehumanizing in the world of Eldritch Skies--but because of the overall structure. The PCs are assumed to be part of an organization that's tasked with solving various problems that pop up as humanity expands out into the cosmos, the threat of total extinction is hanging over humanity's head, a lot of offworld colonies are based on exploring alien ruins, and so on. This is a good thing, because Eclipse Phase is excellent.

Anyway, what makes Eldritch Skies a sci-fi Lovecraft take other than that the players can talk to the horrible monsters as well as be eaten by them? Part of it is the approach to world-building it takes. When discussing the structure of the universe, the book (albeit obliquely) refers to the Great Filter in the discussion of the fate of every space-faring species. The vast majority of species either go extinct or transcend, though some species find a stable equilibrium and stagnate as their psychology prevents them from making any new technological discoveries unless they experiment with alien technology, and some species try to transcend and screw up or only partially transcend, leading to creatures like the flying polyps or the star-spawn of Cthulhu.

Hyperspace mentioned above is how a lot of the Lovecraftian metaphysics and background is all tied together. Humans who gain "hyperspace exposure" can become psychic, and psychic powers or sorcery can cause hyperspacial exposure, as can alien artifacts based on hyperspacial principles, or even simply traveling through hyperspace (which makes the colonies perhaps more dangerous than they otherwise might be...). Humans exposed too much develop an increasingly inhuman mindset, and eventually transform into hideous monsters. This is the source of ghouls and deep ones.

Similarly, hyperspace is where the servitors of the Outer Gods and the Great Old Ones live. In Eldritch Skies, Great Old Ones might be natural, or they might be the result of certain individuals transcending, or possibly the amalgamation of an entire species transcending. Servitors and Great Old Ones typically don't have much contact with the physical world unless they are summoned or something catches their interest, and one of the ways to attract their notice is...high levels of hyperspacial exposure. This is one of the reasons why extinction is so common: a species begins experimenting with hyperspace, an experiment goes hideously wrong, Cthulhu or the alien equivalent takes notice, and millennia later some other species exploring its local surroundings finds a world with its atmosphere blasted away, or evenly-spaced craters covering the entire planet's surface, or perfectly preserved ruins with no trace that anyone ever lived there, and so on.

This is another point I think connects it to Eclipse Phase--humanity's exploration of the cosmos is probably the only thing that will ensure its survival as a species, but at the same time, it makes it far more likely that humanity will attract unwanted attention leading to its total extinction.

There are a few planets listed here that humanity has discovered, including Firefly, where almost all life is part of vast communal organisms called "metas"; or Colossus, which experiments indicate is actually a Dyson sphere built around a gas giant and has a surface area 300x that of Earth; or Eridanos, where some old catastrophe boiled off the oceans and rent the planet with giant rifts into which life had to descend to survive; or Galatea, where humans used sorcery to travel there millennia ago and the planet is a series of city-states ruled by sorcerer-kings like something out of The Coming of Conan the Cimmerian. If some of these sound similar to some of the planets in Gatecrashing, that's because they are, but the similarity is pretty superficial, and anyway Galatea is way more similar to Stargate. And frankly, that's fine to me, because Lovecraftian Stargate is great tastes that taste great together.

I haven't been talking about the mechanics at all, but that's mainly because I don't really like Unisystem. It's a perfectly fine system, it's just not for me, so reading the system parts of the book mostly either put me to sleep or made my eyes glaze over. I bought Eldritch Skies for the fluff anyway so I don't mind, but you might have another opinion.

This gets four stars only because there are huge portions of the book I can't use and that actively resisted my reading them. Taken solely on the fluff and ability of the book to inspire, it's five stars all the way. If you're tired of reading interpretations of Lovecraft that read more like Gnosticism, where the universe is intrinsically inimical to humanity specifically and every non-human species has it out for humanity and the only possible fate is madness and death, Eldritch Skies is an excellent antidode.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Eldritch Skies
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City of Clocks
by Tore N. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/17/2013 02:51:45
City of Clocks Review


City of Clocks (CoC in the following) is a systemless industrial fantasy setting. I am reviewing the .pdf version.

The physical thing

The document is 176 pages of text and black & white illustrations. It loads and reads well off my small off-brand e-reader (with e-paper), as well as off my clanking old laptop. It feels as though it is made with the reader in mind. The editing seems to be pretty good, and I've not found any errors worth noting.
There is no index, but the table of contents is very good and thorough.

The art is mostly characters, with very few representations of the city itself. It would have been nice to have examples of buildings, streets and shops, but it is really a very minor complaint. The character art is very good in that it feels like representations of actual people. The characters have character I guess you might say.

Chapter 1
The setting starts with a history chapter, or to be more specific a mythology chapter gradually becoming history. The mythology, or creation story is quickly done away with, and mostly consists of generations of god-like beings betraying their creators/parents. This happens three times by my count, and when we came to the humans and other species overthrowing the Luminaries (self-made demigods) I was smiling a bit. The Luminaries created the original city of clocks, and their legacy is many undiscovered or ill-understood secrets, among which are the Incarnae, humans with great powers. The rest of the mytpothological bits seem to be of little import to the setting.
The human history on the other hand is full of neat tidbits and conflicts. Clashes between religions and between patricians and plebs gradually turn a democracy into an oligarchy and a police state. Along the way we are introduced to merchants, nobles and even an economist, all of whom have shaped the city through good and bad times.
The writing is a bit dry, but I see that as a good thing. It never becomes self-indulgent and overly florid, but gives the reader a ton of well-sketched ideas to build on. It comes across as potential and not a straitjacket.

Chapter 2
The second chapter is a primer of sorts. 'What every citizen should know', you might say. The chapter is short but sweet. It tells you abut the species: constructs (sapient androids built long ago by and ancient species), Geks (a man-sized ant with four legs and two arms, centaur-style) and Sentenni (long-lived near-humans with and alien culture).
There is a section on technology, describing firearms, walkers and airships powered by 'ice', which is primordial chaos in frozen form. It is thus neither steam-driven nor clockwork, and the aesthetic does not seem to be terribly 'steampunk' either.
There are articles on law enforcement, class, family, timekeeping and architecture. The information is ample, yet kept fairly brief. There is a modular feel too it as well. It's there if it is needed, but it's not the sort of thing a GM or player will need to memorize.

Chapter 3
Chapter three contains maps of the city, as well as a neighborhood-by-neighborhood guide to the city. It is clearly written and easy to reference via the table of contents and the maps.
Here's where I'm reminded by Over The Edge and its setting Al Amaja. It feels like a densely populated and bustling place where interesting things are happening in every corner. Here's a patrician's mansion full of mysteries, a run-down clockwork amusement park where nightmares emerge from the ground, Sentenni ghettos (and there is an amusing reason for why that word is used in-setting), crime-ridden tenements and pubs where the resistance buy their guns. There are many story-seeds in the City of Clocks.

Chapter 4
The City is full of power groups, city-wide institutions and conspiracies, and they're the topic of this chapter. Each group has its own potted history, a description of their power base, as well as people of importance within the group. There are some very evocative 'head shot' illustrations of these people (and constructs, ant-people etc).
In this chapter one finds the low-down on the Clergy (the powerful church), the Cabal (a mysterious secret society going through an internal conflict), the Emotes (artists and sybarites, reminiscent of Planescape's Sensates), the Soldat (a fraternity of law men and soldiers), as well as farmers, librarians and capitalists.
This chapter is chockful of intrigue, mystery and conflict. There's enough here for a bunch of long campaigns of action and politics.
Chapter 5
Chapter five deals with the nine noble houses who influence much in the City. This chapter is structured in the same way as the previous one, but it makes sense to to have the Houses in a seperate chapter, since their power is so pervasive and well-consolidated.
The Houses are (with one exception) families, each with their eligible bachelors, senile patriarchs and black sheep.
Chapter 6
A very short chapter dealing with the Incarnae, humans who have been endowed with the ability to manipulate reality. Some are servants of the City's parliament, while many others have shrugged off their conditioning and rebelled. Incarnae have powers based in an archetypal or ideal version of themselves. A soldier wil thus be THE soldier and so forth.
The Incarnae and their powers are not fully understood, as the process of creating them is invented bu the Luminaries.
Chapter 7
The final chapter deals with the secrets of the Luminaries (the species of City-building demigods described in chapter 1), their influence, the threat they pose, and how to use them in a game. They ARE an ancient evil, but there is nothing Lovecraftian about them. That may be a comfort to some.

So, what can you do with all this? Well, the setting does not assume that players take on specific roles. It's easy to come up with pitches for a campaign or scenario.

Legal advocates fighting for truth in a system which favors the powerful and well-connected (something like the BBC series Garrow's Law). Uses a version of Gumshoe.
Incarnae as flawed supers in league with the underground resistance. Uses ICONS (or whichever supers-system you like).
Brutal slice-of-life drama in a bustling fantasy City (using the rules of In A Wicked Age, but you have to create an Oracle for that).
Gritty crime drama where Civil Enforcement officers must navigate between cutthroat crooks and entitled patricians. (Uses the free MiniSix, 'cos I like it).

The fact that the setting is systemless gives a great deal of freedom to play around with the various groups in the setting and the various systems on your shelves.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
City of Clocks
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Kaiser's Gate Setting Soundtrack
by Norbert D. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/06/2012 15:07:09
The worst soundtrack I heard for a long time. In my opinion, the music is bad, the performing is bad and those synthetic sounds fit absolutely not in world war I. I regret having bought that soundtrack. Listen to the work of "Erdenstern" and you know how great RPG Music can be.

Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
Kaiser's Gate  Setting Soundtrack
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Eldritch Skies (Kindle Edition)
by Nenad R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 09/03/2012 07:44:30
Unisystem is one of my favourite RP systems, due to its simplicity and robustness. The basic premise is simple: Roll a d10, add attribute ability, and try to beat 10. This version uses the cinematic unisystem, as seen in the Buffy RPG. It is pretty much the same system as used in the other cinematic games.

The setting is interesting, based on the original writings of Lovercraft, but extending them into the future, resulting in a Lovercraftian Space Opera setting. The emphasis of the game is more on exploration and discovery, rather than getting driven insane by gibbering monstrosities (although there are plenty of those, should you be more inclined that way).

While I really like the game, the presentation is far from perfect, with the kindle format making the tables hard to read. The system is not table-intensive, but there are several of them, and they could have been optimised for the kindle screen.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Eldritch Skies (Kindle Edition)
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Publisher Reply:
Thank you so much for your review, and I appreciate your honesty. We will see what we can do about fixing those tables as soon as we can. I very much appreciate the feedback. It helps make this game better.
Eldritch Skies
by Robert G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/16/2012 18:03:43
when I tried to open the file I got and error (109) please help

Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Eldritch Skies
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Publisher Reply:
I tried to contact you privately, but for some reason I can not locate an email address for you in the sales reports. Try to download the game again, as it might have been being updated at the time you downloaded it originally. If you are still having problems, please contact me directly and I will personally send you the PDF. Thank you so much for your patronage.
Kaiser's Gate
by Thomas B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 08/05/2012 22:42:46
WHAT WORKS: I don't really like Power Points, so an alternate magic system is always welcome. I like the wide range of material covered in the timeline, from the beginning of magical crime through the end of World War I. The new Edges (mostly aimed at dogfighting) feel particularly appropriate, given the setting.

WHAT DOESN'T WORK: Setting-wise, it feels almost like TOO much has been crammed into one book...but I could also see how one could prefer that to a more limited book. Enterprising GMs can certainly expand from the material given, and if demand is there, Battlefield Press can always expand the setting with supplements. Minor quibble: A lot of earlier Savage Settings had the problem of multiple shared elements, namely zombies and Atlantis, so linking the events of Kaiser's Gate to the Tunguska event immediately took me back to Necessary Evil, which does the same (albeit with a completely different result).

CONCLUSION: First off, it's nice to see something focused on World War I instead of World War II. Second of all, they showed a lot of restraint with the new material added, especially Edges, focusing on expanding aerial dogfighting. The races are included with a caveat of "Humans are the default, the rest must be approved by the GM", and I vastly prefer options to turn on and off over omission in just about every case. There are some d20isms still present, including the racial selection, some of the new spells and the magic item selection. I always like a good bestiary, but a lot of what you need for this is already going to be in Savage Worlds. Lastly, in an odd note, it refers you to the Explorer's Edition over the Deluxe Edition. Very good work here and a great time to jump on, with the Kickstarter still in effect, because of all the bonus material that has already been unlocked.

For my full review, please visit: http://mostunreadblogever.blogspot.com/2012/04/tommys-take-o-
n-kaisers-gate.html

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Kaiser's Gate
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Publisher Reply:
The reference to the Explorer's Edition over the Deluxe Edition is and editing error that we missed, thank you for pointing it out. We will get that fixed as quickly as we can, and should be fixed before we release the print version of the game.
Eldritch Skies
by Alexander O. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 07/19/2012 19:14:00
I like this RPG, though the succeeding paragraph may not seem to make that point -- trust that the rest of the paragraphs do.

First the negative: this book is not really laid out (or organized) to my tastes. It's done in a competent manner, but there are certain slips that, in my opinion should be addressed to make the book stronger and easier not only to read, but also to use a as a reference book. In general, I do agree with the ordering of the material, but I feel strongly about trimming the 'game fiction for flavor', a more refined layout from the two column approach, and a more detailed table of contents.

Next, the positive: this is, surprisingly, a different take on the Lovecraftian mythology. It goes purist in that it ignores a lot of the post-Lovecraft additions to the Mythos, but allows for both the pessimistic and optimistic Lovecraftian play. And it takes the characters into space, allows characters to play with sorcery, forces characters to deal with the various races on Earth and beyond, and exposes characters to Hyperspatial radiation.

The games you play here could easily echo a Twilight Zone episode or Bradbury's Mars tales, your games can inject a sense of exploring the unknown, pushing the limits, and taking mankind beyond its cradle into a dangerous universe that could easily kill him or, strangely enough, king him. Not all endings need to result in the deaths of the protagonists -- some might survive, or even thrive as Randolph Carter did in the Dreamlands.

The juxtaposition of the open secret of hyperdimensional travel with the strange dangers of the mythos-filled universe is interesting for me. The actions of world governments and individuals in the timeline feel plausible and interesting to me, and the opportunities for a different type of space adventure / horror / exploration campaign are very appealing.

I also like (though I've not playtested) the unfolding of the cinematic Unisystem ruleset to allow for fast play. The character templates give a broad spectrum of recognizable archetypes, the character creation rules and gear give enough twists to optimize and ready your character for adventure.

This is a densely detailed, finely crafted setting. It provides standard kits for different types of military and scientific teams. It details a wide variety of realms and worlds that humanity has gone to or can go to. It provides a ready kit of well-known (and lesser known) creatures and dangers to threaten the PCs with. And it manages to maintain a Science Fiction feel despite the presence of the Lovecraftian elements. You don't get that overwhelming 'small band of heroes against a government conspiracy' feel that you do in Delta Green (which I love); in Eldritch Skies you get a 'humanity with all its strengths and foibles against the sea of unknowable terror and wonder that is the universe' vibe.

There's potential here to celebrate exploration of the universe, to celebrate the human spirit that seeks to push farther and delve further into cosmic mysteries than it has any right to, to celebrate cooperation and conflict and courage. There's also potential to expose all the ugly sides of the human condition -- greed, pride, and a lust for personal power at the cost of other peoples' lives and loves.

It reminds me of the potential of shows like the early season(s) of X-files and Earth: Final Conflict, and of (as mentioned above) the Twilight Zone episodes about space exploration and the Bradbury Mars Chronicles -- a wonderfully dark merging of science and weirdness that somehow avoids becoming science fantasy (which it technically is) and somehow avoids being merely horror in space.

If this is your kind of thing, give Eldritch Skies a shot.

(this review also appears on my blog: http://armchairgamer.blogspot.com. I originally posted a shorter version of the review, realized I had more to say to fully represent my opinion; so I deleted the old one and posted this new one.)

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Eldritch Skies
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Eldritch Skies
by Paul D. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/15/2012 17:15:20
Eldritch Skies is quite a fascinating product. It takes the Cthulhu mythos and translates into a sci-fi setting with a logical alternate history of the 20th century. It presents a space game where there is both wonder and terror to be encountered among the stars.

Shortly before purchasing this I was thinking of having a homebrew setting with aliens that were both much more powerful than humanity (rare in my experience) as well as less advanced (quite common). There is a reason for finding other planets with human populations built into the setting as well as interpretations of the Mi-Go, Deep Ones and Ghouls that work well and will keep adventurers on their toes.

If you like sci-fi, cosmic horror and/or Sorcerors and Starships this product is worth your while.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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