DriveThruRPG.com
Close
New Account
 
  
 
 
You will lose your chance to get the free product of the week.
One-click unsubscribe later if you don't enjoy the newsletter.
Close
Log In
 
 Forgot password?
 

     or     Log In with your Facebook Account
Browse
 Publisher Info









Back
Other comments left for this publisher:
Large & Medium Tree Tiles
by Dean R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/30/2009 08:42:31
It's an okay system, useful. What the hell, it's free.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Large & Medium Tree Tiles
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Large & Medium Tree Tiles
by andrew t. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/08/2008 08:29:30
You have a couple sheets of trees. Basically, you have 4 trees, 2 with full foliage, 2 with partial. You have many of the same ones, especially as the small ones are duplicates of the big ones. I thought the quality of the artwork was passable, especially since it is a free pack, but certainly not a stand out rendering.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Click here to issue a publisher reply
The Kyngdoms Full Map
by Jose A. A. G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/28/2007 09:53:07
The Kyngdoms is a wonderfully detailed campaign setting for the 3.5 D20 system by Keith Robinson. The vast ammounts of detailed locations available require good quality maps.

The Kyngdoms Full Map is a HUGE pdf that provides the complete map to the world of Arrasia in a single file.

Printing this huge map in a plotter is possible --I did that myself, although they still had to shrink the map a little bit, even using the largest plotter in the local poster shop. However, I have found that the best use of this product is to print a select region for your current adventure.

All in all, I found this a better value than the Kyngdoms Atlas, but of course, some people will like the Atlas format better.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Kyngdoms Full Map
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
The Kyngdoms Campaign Setting
by Jose A. A. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/26/2007 16:31:20
Having read some information about this setting in the author's website (http://www.thekyngdoms.com) I decided to purchase this product. This is completely worth the price.

This D20 campaign setting can be compared to an Italian vanilla ice-cream. It is full of rich and subtle flavors, yet it is still vanilla.

Let me explain: The Kyngdoms is a "standard" D20 world where Orcs are Orcs-as-you-know-them, Elves are Elves-as-you-know-them, and Halflings... Well, you get the idea.

However, the world is complex and painstakingly detailed, with a complete backstory to all of its elements, yet it lacks the over-powered deus ex machina NPCs that seem to plague some commercial campaign settings (Im looking at you Elminster!). In The Kyngdoms, the stage is set for the PCs to become the heroes of the land.

In short, it may not be exotic or groundbreaking but it's a perfect setting for those DMs that want a "standard" D20 fantasy world to set their adventures in.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Kyngdoms Campaign Setting
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
The Shadow of Fane
by john s. Date Added: 01/12/2007 18:10:07
The Shadow of Fane (D20) – A Review
Format: 41 page PDF (35 content pages 27,000 content words),
Price: $6.50 (around £4.50)
Publisher: Red Moon Games (www.redmoongames.com)
Author personally known by reviewer (but no free review copy)

Overview
The Shadow of Fane is part two of a three part epic story-arc, the Fane trilogy. Each part being a complete stand-alone adventure in its own right. Despite being the shortest, it is also my personal favourite of the three. In my opinion it is likely to satisfy the widest audience with a good balance of combat and character interaction and several detailed set-piece encounters that help to make it memorable. The climactic and possibly unexpected ending also rounds it off nicely.

If playing the second part of the trilogy the party are pursuing a cult, dedicated to a long dead evil arch-mage, who are intent on awakening an ancient evil .The cult members, led by a charismatic priest, have so far left a trail of death and destruction along their path.

If playing as a standalone then the suggested introduction is that the party have been hired by village elders after their village has been threatened and forced to pay a regular tribute which it can no longer pay.

The adventure is in 2 parts:
• Chapter 1 is a journey through the mountains towards the base of Mount Fane and the memorable encounters along the way.
• Chapter 2 details the Kobold lair and the final epic encounter with the power behind the Kobold throne (plan ahead and pack a clean set of underwear!).

It is suitable for adventurers of 3rd level and should take them up to 5th level on completion. Each of the two chapters should last 4 to 6 sessions each giving a total gaming time of around ten sessions.

Pros and Cons
The scenario is laid out well and logically. Atmospheric text is provided for most locations whether there is an encounter or not. Descriptions of encounters are complete with stats and likely actions.

There are several detailed set-piece encounters that give the scenario depth. Even amongst the numerous Kobolds encountered many are named and have clear roles within the tribe adding characterisation and the potential for interaction.

The excellent cover art is provided by Anne Stokes who does lots of fantasy artwork including work for Wizards of the Coast. The cover pages look very good but a minor consideration is all that green ink would be a printer cartridge killer should you actually choose to print them. There are around ten pieces of atmospheric art spread throughout the book. These are good quality black and white drawings that match the storyline and can be used to provide player handouts or for scene setting. Some are “action” drawings so cannot be used until the action kicks-off.

The players’ adventure centres on the pursuit of an evil-cult as they try to reach the Tower of Fane. The GMs adventure centres on the PCs and the cult members penetrating into the territory of a Kobold’s lair.

For the GM it is easy to run, as once the underlying plot elements are known things unfold generally as you would expect. For the players who are pursuing a different goal it is a somewhat bumpier ride.

The opponents and monsters are intelligent and use good tactics and good terrain. What may have been a walkover in other scenarios may provide a strong challenge here, which could catch some players’ off-guard. If you thought Kobolds weren't serious opponents then this scenario will change your mind.

There are consequences for not completing certain parts of the scenario that can affect the players in later adventures if required.

If playing as a standalone rather than as part of the trilogy, the suggested introduction gives away the ending. So perhaps a variant introduction should be tried to maximise the player surprise particularly with experienced players. On the other hand beginning players might need to be forewarned to be able to plan ahead and cope with the final encounter.

The Fane Trilogy:
- Part one starts off in a sleepy village and ends in a church in the foothills of the mountains. In pursuit of the mysterious priest Ungal and those villagers who have gone to awaken ancient evil.

- Part two details the journey through the mountains to the base of mount Fane and the real source of the Kobold menace.

- Part three details the final climb and entry into the recently reopened Tower of Fane itself. The party have the final showdown with Ungal and then have to escape from the magically sealed tower.

Sensible and detailed suggestions are given on how to run each adventure as a standalone.

Nominally set in The Kyngdoms campaign setting, they could easily be set in any fantasy world with minimal changes, just a few names of places and deities to alter.

What do you get for your money?
The scenario is 35 printed pages (27,000 words) of actual adventure (not counting the cover pages and OGL legalese). This consists of:

- 3 pages of GMs introduction detailing the background, and plot.

- 12 pages on Chapter 1 – the journey through the mountains - 22 locations

- 13 pages on Chapter 2 – the Kobold Lair – 29 locations

- 3 pages of GMs notes on concluding the adventure and how to run it as a standalone.

- 4 pages of maps and floor-plans

Many locations have atmospheric text that the GM can read aloud. There are encounters ranging up to CR 6. Each encountered creature is given a full stat block so you don’t need to refer to other sources during the game. Locations follow best practice and provide full details of their contents and DCs required to perform expected tasks there as well as any other details required to link encounters together.

What play styles is it suited to?
Chapter 1 is by necessity a linear trek through the mountains. Amongst many other natural and monster encounters there are four detailed set piece encounters in this section with around a page of the scenario dedicated to each one. These four provide varying degrees of scope for character interaction as well as providing a very entertaining encounter with an Ogre and his son.

Chapter 2 is the investigation of the Kobold Warren. Many of the Kobolds have names and specific roles, so these are not just generic Kobolds.

As there are prisoners and factions to deal with then character interaction is a play style that is catered for and which could make a difference to the outcome.

Overall the scenario is well balanced with action predominating and therefore suited to action oriented players though those preferring character interaction are not neglected.

What would I change?
If playing as part two of the trilogy then I can’t find anything to change. One of the reasons I like it so much is that I could pick it up and play it as it comes with minimal preparation.

If playing as a standalone with experienced players then I would try and find an introduction that didn’t give away the final encounter at the start. The suggested introduction both gives away the plot-twist ending and though unlikely, could potentially deter a typical 3rd level party from taking the job.

Would I run it?
Yes! It is a classic example of how to do a balanced and memorable adventure. The encounters story is gritty and realistic and everything fits together so well. It should make you look like a great and knowledgeable GM without trying too hard.

Overall
Great consistency and intelligent design make this an easy scenario to run and one that will hold both challenge and lasting memories for the players. There is also plenty of scope for combat, interaction and action adventure along the way.

The scenario is well done and fully detailed making it easy to run and a good read. It hangs together well and has lots of useful atmospheric text to make the GMs job easier. A great example of how to do a professional balanced scenario.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Shadow of Fane
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
The Cult of Fane
by john s. Date Added: 01/12/2007 18:08:12
The Cult of Fane (D20) - A Review
Format: 53 page PDF (47 content pages 35,000 content words),
Price: $6.50 (around £4.50)
Publisher: Red Moon Games (www.redmoongames.com)
Author personally known by reviewer (but no free review copy)

Overview
The Cult of Fane is part one of a three part epic story-arc, the Fane trilogy. Each part being a complete stand-alone adventure in its own right. It is also the most open-ended of the three scenarios as the adventurers must initially piece together the plot and act on their findings.

The story arc involves a local cult, dedicated to a long dead evil arch-mage, which has become active after long foretold portents of the mages return are seen. The arrival of a charismatic priest in the village and his subsequent departure apparently with a good chunk of the population is the trigger for the first part of the adventure.

The adventure is in 4 parts:
• Chapter 1 is information gathering, finding assistance, identifying the main protagonists and planning.
• Chapter 2 is a visit to cult HQ. A complete mansion to explore.
• Chapter 3 is the journey to the Church in the mountains and the encounters along the way.
• Chapter 4 is the final encounter at the Church.

The four parts of the adventure are relatively self-contained and are fairly clearly delineated. They should be done in order, though the investigation of the mansion could be omitted, as the adventure is structured to cope with that and other omissions. Should certain events not happen as expected then there are logical consequences, which could lead to further adventures or complications for the party later on. This is probably the best method of dealing with structured adventures that I have seen.

It is suitable for starting adventurers of 1st level and should take them up to 3rd level on completion. Each of the four chapters should last 2 to 4 sessions each, so total gaming time is around a dozen sessions.

Pros and Cons
One of its great strengths and a hallmark of all the Fane modules is consistency. Consistency with the rules, with the monsters and internally with itself. Seemingly everything has been considered and arranged logically. The author obviously knows the rules well, uses the monsters intelligently, and doesn’t take liberties with either. There is no rules breaking or stretching to achieve desired effects and the elements make sense in the settings reality.

The scenario is well laid out and logical. Atmospheric text is provided for most locations whether there is an encounter or not. Descriptions of encounters are complete with stats and likely actions.

The excellent cover art is provided by Anne Stokes who does lots of fantasy artwork including the covers to Mongoose’s Drow Wars books. The covers look very good but a minor consideration is all that green ink would be a printer cartridge killer should you actually choose to print the covers. There are around ten pieces of atmospheric art spread throughout the book. These are good quality black and white drawings that match the storyline and can be used to provide player handouts or for scene setting.

There is a lot to take in. As the setting is internally consistent and there are interrelating plot elements the DM needs to have quite a good grasp of it before starting.

The open-ended nature of the beginning may need to be judiciously handled if you have players who are more used to linear scenarios.

The opponents and monsters are intelligent and use good tactics. What may have been a walkover in other scenarios may provide a strong challenge here, which could catch some players off-guard.

The adventure centres on an evil-cult and you get pretty much what you would expect including quite a few undead.

The Fane Trilogy:
- Part one starts in a sleepy village and ends in a church in the foothills of the mountains. It follows the pursuit of the mysterious priest Ungal and those villagers who have gone to awaken an ancient evil.

- Part two details the journey through the mountains to the base of Mount Fane and uncovering the real source of the Kobold menace.

- Part three details the final climb and entry into the recently reopened Tower of Fane itself. The party has its final showdown with Ungal and then must escape from the magically sealed tower.

Sensible and detailed suggestions are given on how to run each adventure as a standalone.

Nominally set in the Kyngdoms campaign setting, they could easily be set in any fantasy world with minimal changes, just a few names of places and deities to alter.

What do you get for your money?
The scenario is 47 printed pages (35,000 words) of actual adventure (not counting the cover pages and OGL legalese). This consists of:

- 3.5 pages of GMs introduction detailing the background, and plot.

- 9 pages on Chapter 1 – the Village of Mazula - 16 locations, 10 notable NPCs.

- 10.5 pages on Chapter 2 – the cult’s huge mansion – 56 locations, 1 notable NPC. Cult members and animated undead to overcome.

- 7 pages on Chapter 3 – the journey through the mountains – 14 locations. Many natural hazards and other wilderness encounters to overcome

- 7 pages on Chapter 4 - the climactic encounter at the church – 22 locations and many undead to overcome

- 3 pages of GMs notes on concluding the adventure and how to run it as a standalone.

- 2 pages of player handouts

- 5 pages of maps and floor-plans

Many locations have atmospheric text that the GM can read aloud. They follow best practice and provide full details of their contents and DCs required to perform expected tasks there as well as any other details required to link encounters together.

There are many encounters ranging up to CR 4. Each encountered creature is given a full stat block so you don’t need to refer to other sources during the game.

What play styles is it suited to?
Chapter 1 has plenty of NPCs with their own opinions, secrets to hide, and information or items to help or hinder the party or the investigation. So there are plenty of opportunities for character interaction and only limited scope for combat here.

Chapter 2 is a kind of dungeon crawl of the cult HQ, but with important information to gather along the way. So plenty of opportunity for fighting, sneaking and general mayhem but little character interaction apart from one important NPC.

Chapter 3 is a road trip with set and random wilderness encounters. Mostly natural hazards and combat.

Chapter 4 is an undead fest.

Overall the scenario is well suited to action oriented players though those preferring character interaction are not neglected. Particularly at the beginning there is scope for in-depth character interaction.

What would I change?
As the plot starts off as an investigation is it important to fully understand who-is-who and who-knows-what from the outset. Making a mistake here could send the players off in the wrong direction (and make you look badly prepared).

If I was running it I would create a central checklist of the NPCs, who they are, what they know, who they know and what others suspect about them. This is available in the module but spread out over their encounter locations. So it wont take that long to put together and will help you understand the plot elements more easily. It will also simplify the running of the investigation significantly.

Would I run it?
Yes! It is a great example of how to do an open-ended start to an adventure. The story is gritty and realistic and everything fits together so well. It should make you look like a good and knowledgeable GM without trying too hard.

Overall
The size and consistency of the module means that you have to have a reasonable understanding of the innards before running it. Great consistency and intelligent design make this an easy scenario to run and one that will hold both challenge and intrigue for the players. There is also plenty of scope for combat and action adventure along the way.

The scenario is well done and fully detailed making it easy to run and a good read. It hangs together well and has lots of useful atmospheric text to make the GMs job easier. It is a good example of how to do a professional action-oriented scenario.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
The Cult of Fane
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
The Cult of Fane
by john b. Date Added: 01/12/2007 18:03:35
[b]The Shadow of Fane (D20) – A Review[/b]
Format: 41 page PDF (35 content pages 27,000 content words),
Price: $6.50 (around £4.50)
Publisher: [url=www.redmoongames.com]Red Moon Games[/url] (www.redmoongames.com)
Author personally known by reviewer (but no free review copy)

[b]Overview[/b]
The Shadow of Fane is part two of a three part epic story-arc, the Fane trilogy. Each part being a complete stand-alone adventure in its own right. Despite being the shortest, it is also my personal favourite of the three. In my opinion it is likely to satisfy the widest audience with a good balance of combat and character interaction and several detailed set-piece encounters that help to make it memorable. The climactic and possibly unexpected ending also rounds it off nicely.

If playing the second part of the trilogy the party are pursuing a cult, dedicated to a long dead evil arch-mage, who are intent on awakening an ancient evil .The cult members, led by a charismatic priest, have so far left a trail of death and destruction along their path.

If playing as a standalone then the suggested introduction is that the party have been hired by village elders after their village has been threatened and forced to pay a regular tribute which it can no longer pay.

The adventure is in 2 parts:
• Chapter 1 is a journey through the mountains towards the base of Mount Fane and the memorable encounters along the way.
• Chapter 2 details the Kobold lair and the final epic encounter with the power behind the Kobold throne (plan ahead and pack a clean set of underwear!).

It is suitable for adventurers of 3rd level and should take them up to 5th level on completion. Each of the two chapters should last 4 to 6 sessions each giving a total gaming time of around ten sessions.

[b]Pros and Cons[/b]
The scenario is laid out well and logically. Atmospheric text is provided for most locations whether there is an encounter or not. Descriptions of encounters are complete with stats and likely actions.

There are several detailed set-piece encounters that give the scenario depth. Even amongst the numerous Kobolds encountered many are named and have clear roles within the tribe adding characterisation and the potential for interaction.

The excellent cover art is provided by [url=www.annestokes.com]Anne Stokes[/url] who does lots of fantasy artwork including work for Wizards of the Coast. The cover pages look very good but a minor consideration is all that green ink would be a printer cartridge killer should you actually choose to print them. There are around ten pieces of atmospheric art spread throughout the book. These are good quality black and white drawings that match the storyline and can be used to provide player handouts or for scene setting. Some are “action” drawings so cannot be used until the action kicks-off.

The players’ adventure centres on the pursuit of an evil-cult as they try to reach the Tower of Fane. The GMs adventure centres on the PCs and the cult members penetrating into the territory of a Kobold’s lair.

For the GM it is easy to run, as once the underlying plot elements are known things unfold generally as you would expect. For the players who are pursuing a different goal it is a somewhat bumpier ride.

The opponents and monsters are intelligent and use good tactics and good terrain. What may have been a walkover in other scenarios may provide a strong challenge here, which could catch some players’ off-guard. If you thought Kobolds weren't serious opponents then this scenario will change your mind.

There are consequences for not completing certain parts of the scenario that can affect the players in later adventures if required.

If playing as a standalone rather than as part of the trilogy, the suggested introduction gives away the ending. So perhaps a variant introduction should be tried to maximise the player surprise particularly with experienced players. On the other hand beginning players might need to be forewarned to be able to plan ahead and cope with the final encounter.

[b]The Fane Trilogy:[/b]
- Part one starts off in a sleepy village and ends in a church in the foothills of the mountains. In pursuit of the mysterious priest Ungal and those villagers who have gone to awaken ancient evil.

- Part two details the journey through the mountains to the base of mount Fane and the real source of the Kobold menace.

- Part three details the final climb and entry into the recently reopened Tower of Fane itself. The party have the final showdown with Ungal and then have to escape from the magically sealed tower.

Sensible and detailed suggestions are given on how to run each adventure as a standalone.

Nominally set in [url=www.thekyngdoms.com]The Kyngdoms[/url] campaign setting, they could easily be set in any fantasy world with minimal changes, just a few names of places and deities to alter.

[b]What do you get for your money?[/b]
The scenario is 35 printed pages (27,000 words) of actual adventure (not counting the cover pages and OGL legalese). This consists of:

- 3 pages of GMs introduction detailing the background, and plot.

- 12 pages on Chapter 1 – the journey through the mountains - 22 locations

- 13 pages on Chapter 2 – the Kobold Lair – 29 locations

- 3 pages of GMs notes on concluding the adventure and how to run it as a standalone.

- 4 pages of maps and floor-plans

Many locations have atmospheric text that the GM can read aloud. There are encounters ranging up to CR 6. Each encountered creature is given a full stat block so you don’t need to refer to other sources during the game. Locations follow best practice and provide full details of their contents and DCs required to perform expected tasks there as well as any other details required to link encounters together.

[b]What play styles is it suited to?[/b]
Chapter 1 is by necessity a linear trek through the mountains. Amongst many other natural and monster encounters there are four detailed set piece encounters in this section with around a page of the scenario dedicated to each one. These four provide varying degrees of scope for character interaction as well as providing a very entertaining encounter with an Ogre and his son.

Chapter 2 is the investigation of the Kobold Warren. Many of the Kobolds have names and specific roles, so these are not just generic Kobolds.

As there are prisoners and factions to deal with then character interaction is a play style that is catered for and which could make a difference to the outcome.

Overall the scenario is well balanced with action predominating and therefore suited to action oriented players though those preferring character interaction are not neglected.

[b]What would I change?[/b]
If playing as part two of the trilogy then I can’t find anything to change. One of the reasons I like it so much is that I could pick it up and play it as it comes with minimal preparation.

If playing as a standalone with experienced players then I would try and find an introduction that didn’t give away the final encounter at the start. The suggested introduction both gives away the plot-twist ending and though unlikely, could potentially deter a typical 3rd level party from taking the job.

[b]Would I run it?[/b]
Yes! It is a classic example of how to do a balanced and memorable adventure. The encounters story is gritty and realistic and everything fits together so well. It should make you look like a great and knowledgeable GM without trying too hard.

[b]Overall[/b]
Great consistency and intelligent design make this an easy scenario to run and one that will hold both challenge and lasting memories for the players. There is also plenty of scope for combat, interaction and action adventure along the way.

The scenario is well done and fully detailed making it easy to run and a good read. It hangs together well and has lots of useful atmospheric text to make the GMs job easier. A great example of how to do a professional balanced scenario.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Click here to issue a publisher reply
The Kyngdoms Campaign Setting
by Crystal A. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/07/2006 00:00:00
greatr - i loved it! i saw on the website and just thout i gotta get it :) theres loads of stuff here with a good bakground and rules and loads of new gods. this is seriously a1 in my book with loads of cool pics and is well layed out :)

QUALITY: Excellent

VALUE: Very Satisfied


Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Kyngdoms Campaign Setting
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
The Kyngdoms Atlas
by Crystal A. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/07/2006 00:00:00
works with the kyngdoms campain setting and is just too cool :) the maps are laid out like a atlas in full color and are grided to make it easy to find places. theres also a cool map in the end of the old world and a index to help find eveything!

QUALITY: Very Good

VALUE: Very Satisfied


Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
The Kyngdoms Atlas
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
The Tower of Fane
by Fester M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/18/2006 00:00:00
Wow! A great adventure - a climb up a mountain, a well planned and stocked tower, plus numerous side trips to extra-dimiensional nodes! There are a number of notable encounters strewn throughout and a lot for both the players and DM to get their teeth into. The obnoxious portraits are just class...

Also well presented with some decent art.

QUALITY: Excellent

VALUE: Very Satisfied


Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Tower of Fane
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
The Cult of Fane
by Jason F. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/07/2006 00:00:00
I ran this module with a group of 7 PCs and we had a great time with it. The story is excellent, and there is plenty of opportunity for good NPC interaction. It has a good balance between role-playing, dungeon crawling, and adventure/travel. The journey through the mountains was especially well done, and several of my players commented on how much they enjoyed the epic feel of it and how different it was from the normal campaigns we've run.

QUALITY: Excellent

VALUE: Very Satisfied


Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Cult of Fane
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
The Shadow of Fane
by Fester M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/07/2006 00:00:00
A nice product, well laid out and presented, The Shadow of Fane is an adventure for 3rd level characters which takes place in the mountains. Although this is the second of three adventures, the author has taken the care to add a detailed section enabling it to be played on its own.

Primarily a combat driven adventure, there are one or two memorable encounters, including with the ogre Drobin and his son, Drobin Jnr., whose descriptions and mannerism were very vivid and rich, plus a encounter where you must save some merchants who have been ambushed (the combat is well underway by the time the adventurers turn up to save the day). The final enocunter is also well thought-out.

QUALITY: Excellent

VALUE: Satisfied


Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
The Shadow of Fane
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
The Kyngdoms Campaign Setting
by Paul M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/04/2006 00:00:00
Very comprehensive campaign setting which sticks to the 3.5 rules and promises to continue to expand and be supported via the Kyngdoms website.


LIKED: Index is very good and accurate

QUALITY: Excellent

VALUE: Very Satisfied


Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Kyngdoms Campaign Setting
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
The Kyngdoms Campaign Setting
by Fester M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/18/2006 00:00:00
The Kyngdoms Campaign Setting is filled with everything you'll need to get a new campaign off the ground. The layout is excellent, logical and easy to use and it is fully indexed, which is something that I find very helpful. It is a full world and allows you to choose the type of game you want play. The background for the world is very detailed and amongst the best I've seen - and that includes the more well known settings - and offers a wide range of role playing opportunities. It comes with a complete pantheon and each nation is given a thorough explanation, with some being exceptionally vibrant and detailed, as are the chapters on the races and cosmology. There are a bunch of spells and feats, but these are mostly taken from other open sources, though where this occurs it is generally seemless.


LIKED: The detail is just amazing. You can really lose yourself in it and it really gets the creative juices flowing. It is also very well laid out and easy to use.

DISLIKED: It could probably do with a unique selling point that helps it stand out from the crowd (though this doesn't detract from it in any way).

QUALITY: Excellent

VALUE: Very Satisfied


Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Click here to issue a publisher reply
The Cult of Fane
by Fester M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/18/2006 00:00:00
A nice adventure for 1st level characters with a detailed village and NPCs. There is a nice balance between investigation and combat, with the plot expanding as the adventure progresses. Although this is designed as the first of three, the writer has included a section which details how to run this as a one off. The maps and artwork are good and it is well presented.


LIKED: This isn't just a hack and slash adventure, but requires some roleplay and investigation. The section on running it as a one off adventure is also very detailed and shows the author actually cared about those not interested in running the other parts.

DISLIKED: I would have liked to have seen more of the ordinary villagers fleshed out, adding another dimension to it.

QUALITY: Excellent

VALUE: Very Satisfied


Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Cult of Fane
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Click here to issue a publisher reply
Displaying 1 to 15 (of 16 reviews) Result Pages:  1  2  [Next >>] 
0 items
 Gift Certificates