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Saga: An Optional Story-Based Combat System
by patrick r. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/17/2014 22:56:33
For a book claiming to reduce all the math and complexity out of combat, it's astounding how it manages to do exactly the opposite of that. Each and every narrative combat roll is split into different stances, divided by needlessly minute factors that increase the math exponentially, and make 'narrative combat' take 5 times long as normal. The sheer amount of addition, subtraction, and division (?!) applied to a single combat roll is mind boggling.

For example, every single feat is translated into a specific bonus or mathematical application to your narrative combat, including a specific narrative phrase to accompany it. If I have to flip through a book just how every feat is operates differently to modify a single attack roll, how is that quicker than just using my normal feats? If I have to repeat a specific phrase to describe something as mundane as feat, something is seriously wrong with me and my ability to "narrate." Some combat rolls have over 5 phases to pass through before being resolved, at which point you throw up your hands and have to ask yourself "what's wrong with just a basic combat roll?? What fever addled brain could possibly think remainders from division makes combat easier???"

By far the worst purchase I've made on DriveThruRPG, and I've been using this site for over 5 years. If you want this much math to speed up your combat, just a buy a 4th grade math textbook and make everyone at the table practice their long hand division. It'd be faster than running combat using this atrocity.

Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
Saga: An Optional Story-Based Combat System
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Thrilling Tales 2nd Edition (Savage Worlds)
by Matt J. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/15/2014 11:33:30
Thrilling Tales is the quintessential “Savage Pulp” book. Whether you’re a pulp vet or new to the genre this book has it all. The first chapter provides background on what pulp was and the genres it encompassed. This is followed by a timeline of historic events from the 1930’s to help fuel adventure or campaign ideas based on what was happening at the time.

The new edges and hindrances really fit the setting and for the most part would work in other Savage Worlds settings as well. The character types suggested in Thrilling Tales provide the framework for just about any pulp archetype you can think of.

Thrilling Tales introduces a few new mechanics to Savage Worlds which are optional but you’d be doing the setting a great injustice by not working them into your game. Examples of two of these are stunts and story declarations. A stunt is an over the top flashier and more difficult way of accomplishing an action that if successful results in bennies for the player. Story declarations allow the players to spend a benny to shape and direct small aspects of the story.

The last section I want to touch on is the adventure generator. By rolling a series of dice across a number of tables you will end up with a well plotted adventure broken down by acts and supplying everything for you from story hooks to plot twists.

I can’t say enough great things about Thrilling Tales! If you are in the least bit interested in pulp or have always been curious but didn’t know where to start this is the best book out there.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Thrilling Tales 2nd Edition (Savage Worlds)
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Once Upon A Time In The Far West
by Dustin W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/02/2013 00:00:00
Not a bad soundtrack overall. I definitely enjoy the whole "Far East meets Wild West" feel that Sam Billen has provided in each of these songs. My only beef is that I wish there were more tracks, especially for the price ($5.00 regular price, $1.99 sale price when I'd bought this album).

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Once Upon A Time In The Far West
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ICONS Team-Up
by Curt M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/17/2013 11:03:35
This is a work of pragmatic rpg genius. Team Up essentially contains the elements of a full-fledged GM's guide writ shorthand for ICONS. ...worth the year plus delay of its release.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
ICONS Team-Up
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The Imperial Age: True20 Edition
by Ron M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/11/2013 09:40:07
The Imperial Age: True20 Edition is a RPG Setting Sourcebook from Adamant Entertainment. I have had a few PDFs in my archives that were given to me to review but due to unforeseen life complications, I was not able to. I felt I owed those products a review, and since I have started Gamer’s Codex, I have gone back in my archives and found a number of those products. The Imperial Age: True20 Edition is one of them.

Up front, I have to confess that I am a big True20 fan. I love the basic d20 mechanic but never liked the clunkyness of the system. True20 solved all those problems for me in one simple and concise generic system. I do not want to turn this into a True20 review but in general, this book already has that in its favor.


See the rest of my review here at www.thegamerscodex.com/index.php/the-imperial-age-true20-edi-
tion/ on The Gamer's Codex.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Imperial Age: True20 Edition
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Thrilling Tales 2e: They Kill By Proxy
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 06/07/2013 10:47:49
This is a rather fun adventure taken from a specific sub-set of pulp fiction - the 'wierd menance' adventure, as explained in the introduction, which gives plenty of ideas to help you set an appropriate mood for your game.

Structurally, the adventure is made up of three 'acts' each leading in to the next... provided, that is, that the characters both survive and find the clues liberally scattered around for them to find. For this is an adventure in which investigation and interaction predominate, with every NPC well-described and provided with his or her own agenda, motivations and intentions. Keep the pace brisk and let the horrors mount up - however, there is plenty material in each act for you to run this as a multi-session adventure, one act per session, if this suits your group's style.

The notes include a delightful selection of 'booby traps' with a range of them - defined as being hazards designed to stop or kill those who stumble in to them - being detailed along with the relevant game mechanics. There's also a sidebar on running cinematic and thrilling court scenes again complete with the necessary rules for moderating them effectively.

Thorough pre-game preparation is recommended and you may wish to source some floorplans for the main locations involved in the adventure, which spans a creepy old country house, central New York, various offices and a courtroom and finally an ocean going yacht!

Presentation in the main is clear, with a nice battered effect giving the impression of an old pulp magazine which does not interfere with the text. One or two errors ought to have been caught by proof-reading, but in general it is possible to figure out what was intended.

Overall, this is a cracking pulp adventure, very true to the spirit of the genre, that should prove entertaining for both GM and players alike!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Thrilling Tales 2e: They Kill By Proxy
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Hot Pursuit: The Definitive D20 Guide to Chases
by Andrew P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/07/2013 02:32:51
If you're looking to run chases in your D&D/Pathfinder game, this product will serve nicely, as long as the following conditions are met:
1. You (the GM) are *planning* to run an exciting chase scene and have time to do the necessary prep-work.
2. The chase will take place in vehicles (cars, chariots, etc.).
3. The players have all studied this guide in preparation for the upcoming exciting chase.

The rules work pretty much like combat, with a few tweaks. They fit well into the existing D&D/Pathfinder rules (some minor conversion-work necessary for Pathfinder, obvious and easy). It doesn't feel like some clunky new system that has been hammered onto the side of the existing ruleset. On the contrary, it feels like a natural extrapolation of the existing rules; simple yet deep, elegant really. It's everything the chase rules in the Pathfinder Advanced Player's Guide aren't.

So what's the problem? Well, in the end, it's just not useful for the majority of chases you're likely to have. The biggest problem is a failure to recognize the most notable feature of a chase: spontaneity. In RPGs, as in real life, chases tend to happen suddenly, without warning, and these rules simply don't work that way. These rules assume that chase scenes are to be scripted by the GM ahead of time. If a chase just suddenly happens, because the players decide to run (well, drive), these rules will not work (unless the GM calls for a break, which would be like kryptonite to any sense of pacing in this situation).

Also, these rules assume that all chases happen in vehicles. If someone gets the idea to use their character's run speed to get away, you're out of luck with these rules. (There is a supplement to these rules that covers footraces. If you buy these rules, buy those rules too. I know, I know... just do it.)

Finally, there is the practical matter of familiarity. This is one of those game mechanics where everyone needs a pretty thorough understanding of how they work from the start. Actions during chases are resolved much like combat maneuvers in a fight. Like combat maneuvers, the players need to be familiar with them in order to use them. For example, in order to use the Disarm action in combat, the player needs to know: 1. that attempting to disarm your foe is an option in the first place; 2. what the disarm action actually accomplishes in game terms, and hopefully 3. how to make the attempt, though the GM can supply this information as needed. Familiarity is actually more important in Hot Pursuit, since literally everything you can do in a chase (and it's quite a list) is equivalent to a combat maneuver. The players need to be aware of all their options, so unless you think passing a copy of these rules to the active player each turn is good for pacing, the players have some studying to do before game day. (A better option, as a GM, might be to have the first chase or two run using these rules play like a tutorial, the way video games do. That's how I like to introduce new mechanics in my game.)

It's a shame I can't rate this higher, because I really do like these rules. Hot Pursuit is a stroke of brilliance in rules design (you'll see what I mean if you check them out). It's just that they don't fit in with the realities of the actual gaming table. I'm not even disappointed that I bought it, because I'm convinced that, with a little creative tweaking (which is on my always-growing to-do list), these rules could be made to overcome their biggest problem (spontaneity), or at least be taken as inspiration for some homebrew alternative. I will say this at least: the Hot Pursuit chase rules (including the Hot Pursuit: On Foot supplement) are better than any other chase rules yet devised for the d20 ruleset, and are a clear foundation for a workable yet exciting method for running chases in a tabletop RPG.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Hot Pursuit: The Definitive D20 Guide to Chases
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Venture 4th: Pact of the Angelic Choirs
by Timothy B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/17/2013 19:26:26
One of my players asked to play a demigod character, and after looking at some of the "canon" 4E options as well as other third-party supplements, I ended up using the Pact of the Angelic Choirs to represent a demigod. Since she didn't just want to happen to have a god as a parent, but truly wanted that to be core to the concept of her character, the abilities and even the flavor text worked great for her character. I used the option mentioned on page 11, and made her power source divine, but changed little else.

I have to note that I was creating a solo adventure for this player, so balance with other characters wasn't important. In fact, I wanted her to be more powerful than a standard 4E character. It fit both her character concept as well as the adventure. I would caution others that some of these powers are powerful -- more so than your average 4E powers. You may need to work with your player/DM to make a few changes before introducing this class into a campaign.

For my needs, this (potentially) divine, ranged striker fit my needs better than the Avenger class did. So far, the player has enjoyed her choice, and the character has been a fun addition to the game.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Venture 4th: Pact of the Angelic Choirs
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City-States of Mars: Korium
by Ralf K. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/14/2012 07:40:58
I really like the MARS setting.
Korium is a good place to center a campaign. The City is well described, has colorfull NPC's that suit a planetary romances / word and scientist setting.
The inhabitants of the city are not arrogant old Martians but former nomads. So you have proud, honorfull citizens that your players have to like. ;-)

The City sounds very good to center a campaign around it. Its possible to play as corsairs, palace guards and nobles, adventurer and explorer. There are many targets for expeditions, enemys and shemes.

There are many, many adventure hooks. Many of them are clever hooks, weaving the enemys of the city in the hooks. But most of the time they are still only hooks, so the GM need to put a lot of work in such hook to get a adventure out of it. I would have prefered fewer "hooks" but more details-More like the Savage tales that are part of many savage worlds campaigns, but other surely prefer many hooks instead some savage tales.

The bad:
There are many typos in the text. Normaly I didnt see them, but at this text they really stand out. Sometimes I get the feeling I read a old scan that get OCR'ed.

The stats: I get the feeling that most NPC's have way to high parry. For example, Itaana-Intense Scholar have fighting d4, but Parry 7. Even with the 1 for her Rapier she should have Parry 5. And a Rapier should have a damage of Str+d4, not d6. And that was only one example.

The rules for the races are nice but some notations sounds more like d20-rules(for example TEST AGIL) and the whole text about races seems structureless.

To sum up: A nice, likeable city. many hooks, many typos. As I write this its reduced to barely 4$. For this price you couldnt do wrong!
I could imagine using it for something like space 1889, too.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
City-States of Mars:  Korium
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THRILLING TALES: Advanced Class-MASTERMIND
by shane c. Date Added: 08/10/2012 19:02:13
Thought I was buying a story/module. As Thrilling Tales in the description says. Obviously I was wrong. If you read deeper into the description it says that this is a character sheet essentially. 2.00 for 5 pages not 7 of charts... anc character stats. If you play this system this might be for you. Otherwise it is a wast of money.

Description:

Adamant Entertainment continues to bring the pulse-pounding excitement of the pulp genre to D20 Modern with Thrilling Tales!

Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
THRILLING TALES: Advanced Class-MASTERMIND
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MARS: Savage Worlds Edition
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 08/06/2012 10:55:00
Adamant Entertainment distilled some of the best features of the Planetary Romance/Sci-Fantasy genre into their Mars books. The lineage is obviously Edgar Rice Burroughs, with Green, Red and White (Ape) Martians. There is also a fair enough amount of H.G. Wells, but I have a hard time seeing this dying Mars invading Earth. As they advertise this is not the Mars of reality, this is the Mars that never was. This is Barsoom as it were. While not "John Carter of Mars the RPG" it can be played that way. There are even some surprises in the form of the Grey Men of Mars. Hint, they are not the "Greys" of later UFO mythology.

There are plenty of options for characters with an emphasis on high heroism and great feats. Imagine all the adventure of Victorian Times and the Pulp Era with the feel of a Space Opera in a D&D campaign then you get an idea of what Mars can do or be. This all reminds me a bit of the "Dying Earth" genre as well, since Mars is dying. Maybe that invasion of Earth is not too improbable after all.

I enjoyed this and really want to play a game on Mars now!
I rated this one a bit higher than the d20 version since I feel the fit with Savage Worlds is a bit better.
This is Savage Mars.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
MARS: Savage Worlds Edition
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MARS: The Roleplaying Game of Planetary Romance (d20 version)
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 08/06/2012 10:54:10
Adamant Entertainment distilled some of the best features of the Planetary Romance/Sci-Fantasy genre into their Mars books. The lineage is obviously Edgar Rice Burroughs, with Green, Red and White (Ape) Martians. There is also a fair enough amount of H.G. Wells, but I have a hard time seeing this dying Mars invading Earth. As they advertise this is not the Mars of reality, this is the Mars that never was. This is Barsoom as it were. While not "John Carter of Mars the RPG" it can be played that way. There are even some surprises in the form of the Grey Men of Mars. Hint, they are not the "Greys" of later UFO mythology.

There are plenty of options for characters with an emphasis on high heroism and great feats. Imagine all the adventure of Victorian Times and the Pulp Era with the feel of a Space Opera in a D&D campaign then you get an idea of what Mars can do or be. This all reminds me a bit of the "Dying Earth" genre as well, since Mars is dying. Maybe that invasion of Earth is not too improbable after all.

I enjoyed this and really want to play a game on Mars now!

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
MARS: The Roleplaying Game of Planetary Romance (d20 version)
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NPC (Non Player Compendium): Volume 1
by Nathan C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/20/2012 23:00:16
When I hear the word "compendium" I assume that it will actually contain more than 16 pages... apparently I was wrong. This pdf only contains a few NPCs and some base thoughts and rules on them. Granted it IS only three dollars but there are much better products containing much more content for the same price.

Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
NPC (Non Player Compendium): Volume 1
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MARS: Savage Worlds Edition
by Aaron H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/10/2012 15:27:21
The following review was originally posted at Roleplayers Chronicle and can be read in its entirety at http://roleplayerschronicle.com/?p=24255.

If you enjoy the planetary romance genre as envisioned by Edgar Rice Burroughs, with a bit of H. G. Wells “War of the Worlds” tripod action thrown in, you’ll have fun with this product. All of your favorite people and creatures are here, whether red, green, white, or grey. This is a collection of all the best tropes in the genre along with some new perspectives, set up to deliver some serious Savage Worlds fun.

OVERALL

I enjoyed MARS and found many worthwhile things that could be used in various genres. One of the strengths of Savage Worlds supplements is that the materials can easily be ported over into other environments. In eight chapters with a 192 page count, the planet and its history are presented very well. Character creation, player character races, gear, setting-specific rules, a gamemastering section, a five-part Plot Point campaign, and an excellent bestiary fill this book with quality content.

RATINGS

Publication Quality: 8 out of 10
The production quality is excellent. There are several grammar and spelling issues which could have been avoided with some more extensive proofreading, but this is only slightly distracting from the otherwise rich content. There is a lot of “white space” which makes the content seem light for those used to very compact formats, but the art and content are very good.

Mechanics: 10 out of 10
The new Edges, Hindrances, and Setting Rules presented in this volume integrate well with the core Savage Worlds rules, and they provide an excellent extension that serves this genre well. The rules for creating new character races and species are particularly useful.

Value Add: 9 out of 10
The planetary romance genre is well-represented and the materials can easily be used to spice up Savage Worlds games in completely different environments. The pricing on both the hard-copy and PDF editions is at the higher end, however the content probably justifies the investment.

Overall: 9 out of 10
Overall, this is an excellent addition to the Savage Worlds RPG and will permit the players to have a rollicking good time on Barsoom. One interesting thought might be to mix elements of Mars: Savage Worlds Edition with Pinnacle’s excellent Space 1889 – Red Sands setting, just to give the British Empire a bit of a challenge. Mars: Savage Worlds Edition is well-supported with a series of supplements available at RPGNow.com, including Blood Legacy of Mars, City-States of Mars: Korium, Face of Mars, Minions of Mars, Rebels of Mars, Sell-Swords of Mars, Sky-Tyrant of Mars, Soul-Thieves of Mars, and Warriors of Mars.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
MARS: Savage Worlds Edition
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Venture 4th: Pact of the Vermin Lords
by Christopher H. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 06/20/2012 12:49:34
Pact of the Vermin Lords was one of the first third-party warlock pacts to appear after the publication of D&D 4e, and deserves props for that alone. The idea behind the pact is a bit “icky”: you’ve bound your soul to whatever mystical forces control vermin. Yuck. The power structure follows the typical template for a warlock: one at-will power that distinctively exhibits the pact, a special effect when an enemy under your Warlock’s Curse is reduced to 0 hp, and a bunch of thematic powers. Unlike the pacts in the original PH, the pact of the vermin lords provides an extra encounter power as a boon; however, author Stefen Styrsky has tried to balance this by turning off the character’s Warlock’s Curse while the bonus encounter power, Recognize the Master, is in effect. The optional powers at each level do a good job of distinguishing the vermin lords pact from other pacts. The supplement also includes a paragon path and one new feat designed to improve the basic pact boon. As a reader, I cringed repeatedly at grammatical mistakes and proofreading oversights, as well as departures from established D&D 4e stylistic standards. As a player, the very idea of the pact makes my skin crawl, and I want nothing to do with it. As a DM, I wouldn’t object if a player wanted to run a vermin lords pact warlock in my campaign, though I’d probably apply some social stigma in NPC encounters. Overall, my feeling about this product is basically, “Take it or leave it.”

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Venture 4th: Pact of the Vermin Lords
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