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Stock Art: Half-Ogre Dragonslayer
Publisher: Purple Duck Games
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 09/18/2012 13:08:49
It says Half-ogre, but it could be a half-giant, half-orc or just a human with odd ears.

In any case the art is great and you get color, grayscale and lineart and an easy to read and use license.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Stock Art: Half-Ogre Dragonslayer
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Stock Art: Human Wizard
Publisher: Purple Duck Games
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 09/18/2012 13:05:58
My son had a very simple request. He wanted a wizard with a beard, but no hat, throwing a huge fire ball.

Purple Duck Games comes through for me again. Full color, line art and grayscale images.
The only thing that would have made this better for me is if the robes and the fireball were blue.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Stock Art: Human Wizard
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Rogue Mage Roleplaying Game Player's Handbook
Publisher: Misfit Studios
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 09/12/2012 10:53:57
What if someone held an apocalypse and nobody came?

That is an over-simplification, but it is the jist of what I get from reading a little bit of the Rogue Mage series by Faith Hunter. Now I need to be upfront here about a few things.

1. I have never read the Rogue Mage books, but they are something I have been aware of and I have been meaning to check out.
2. I know Christina Stiles and have worked with her (somewhat) in the past.

That out of the way, lets look at this game.

Rogue Mage is a new RPG from Christina Stiles and Faith Hunter, published by Misfit Studios.
It is a modern supernatural game, so I am already inclined to like it, but also inclined to be critical of it. I will work to balance this for this review.

The game is a d20 based one, but not 100% d20. There is a list of changes for those of us that pick up a d20 game and try to go as we always have. So no attacks of opportunity, no hp, no classes, no levels and so on. Mostly this resembles Mutants & Masterminds 2nd Ed quite a bit. The damage tracker is similar, but simpler. There is a Toughness save (like M&M) and Combat is a skill (like other games). So mechanics wise this is really an elegant system, but it doesn't add a lot of new material.
So like M&M all you need is a d20 to play.
Also this is the Player's book only. The Game Master's Guide will be out later.

Chapter 1 covers the basic rules of the game. I thought this was a touch odd, since we have not rolled up any characters yet, but I think the reasoning is that the rules are so simple that leading off with them allows you to read them once and then easily refer back to them as needed.

Chapter 2 covers the setting. You don't need have read the Faith Hunter books to use this game, something I think is very important. The books look good and I am looking forward to reading them, but I have this book now. Briefly the world changed with the return of the Seraphs on June 12, 2011. Day before my birthday. The war that follows engulfs the world and leaves it in shambles; in fact it is known as the Last War. The present day is 2117 (or 105 PA, post ap). Given Rush is in concert as of this writing 2112 would have been cooler for me, but hey. Immediately I am drawn to the parallels between this game and Eden's Armageddon. Except in Armageddon the war is still going on and it's 2018 (that seemed SO far away back when I was playtesting the game). The world though in Rogue Mage is more messed up with the new Ice Age and all the plagues. Tech is all over the place with advanced technology in the regions away from the ice to steam powered retro-tech.

Chapter 3 is Character Creation. There are abilities and skills familiar to most d20 games. Characters though have points in which to buy these similar to many other non-d20 systems and M&M. In addition there are Talents, Drawbacks and Magic. First up are the character races; neomage, third-generation kylen, human, seraph-touched, rogue daywalker, and second unforeseen (mule). These are detailed in the book and fit into the cosmology of the game. Races can be bought with character points, or in the case of humans, character points are awarded back to you. Attributes and skills are bought with points. Talents can either be normal, special or supernatural and have varying point costs. Drawbacks give you back points. There are also Luck points (think Hero or Drama points) and a virtue/taint tracker which is a new twist.
There is a character creation walk-through and many sample characters.

Chapter 4 deals with abilities; Strength, Intelligence, Wisdom and so on and saves.
Chapter 5 deals with skills. The list is a familiar one for anyone that has played a d20 game in the last 12 years. Of note though, Combat is a skill now. I rather like that to be honest. A trainable skill instead of a built in aptitude.

Chapter 6 covers Talents. Think of these as something similar to Feats or Qualities, or most like the Powers in True 20. Many of these are Feats from the SRD, but that is fine because they still work here. As you can imagine there are a lot of them here, a little more than 30 pages worth. Then we also get the Drawbacks. These are like negative feats. They take something from you, but you get Character Points in return. We get 10 pages of those.

ASIDE: While this game diverts a bit from the d20 mainstream, there is enough here that is the same to make you wonder if your other d20 resources might work with it. For that answer I would have to say I see no reason why not. Sure you are deviating from the source material more, but mechanically speaking, unless it relates to levels, classes or HP I can't see why it wouldn't work.

Chapter 7 is Magic. There is a lot here, not just in terms of rules for magic, but the spells themselves. Over 46 pages. Again some spells from other games could be converted and used here. One would need to figure out the point cost for casting them. I wonder if the spells from the d20 Call of Cthulhu would be compatible? Or even BESM d20 Advanced Magic. If so, then this game would open up a wealth of playing options.

Chapter 8 details Virtue, Money and Luck. Virtue and Taint stand in for the basic alignment system, but this also has more in-game effects. Virtuous characters are more resilient to some magics for example.
Wealth is a score, rather than a track-able resource like gold pieces. And Luck Points, like I mentioned are like Hero or Drama points.

Chapter 9 discusses Secondary Characters, aka NPCS.
Chapter 10 has equipment. It is an interesting mix of future and past tech and high tech and magic.

Chapter 11 details combat. Combat normally gets it's own chapter, but I would have figured it a little closer to skills. No matter, it is here and it tells you what you need to know. Of importance here is the damage track and conditions rules. Remember, there are no HP here, so this is how you know if you are good or about to die. This combat makes this game a bit more deadly than your typical d20 game.

We end with some fiction from Faith Hunter (each chapter had some too) and an Index.

The layout is clean and easy to read. The art is really good as well and really captures the feel of the game well I think. It is all black and white so it won't kill your printer.

There is a lot I really like about this game. First it has so much potential with things I am already doing. Secondly the fact that is also seems to fit in mechanically with a bunch of books I already have is also great.

I think I would have loved to have seen this as a Unisystem game. But I know there are a lot of reasons why that could not have been done. Plus the rules from Mutants & Masterminds, as I have done in the past, can be tweaked to give you a Unisystem like experience. To be 100% honest if there is anyone out there that could be trusted to do that it is Christina Stiles and Misfit Studios.

Something though is keeping me from absolutely loving this game though. I think it is because I have not read the books it is based on yet. I also think there is not enough information here on how to run a game. That is not a big deal for me really, I have 100s of books that tell me that. I don't know how to run one in this universe.
But these are not the shortcomings of this book; only my understanding of the world of this book.
I do hope the Game Master's Guide comes with a sample adventure.

Here is what I do know. Misfit Studios has done a a great job in the past with Unisystem products and Mutants & Masterminds ones. This rule set seems to be a perfect middle ground for them and I hope that we get to see it for more games.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Rogue Mage Roleplaying Game Player's Handbook
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DC ADVENTURES Heroes & Villains, Vol. 2
Publisher: Green Ronin
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 09/10/2012 16:41:57
Vol 2 of the Heroes & Villain write-ups for the DC Adventures RPG (but it also works for M&M3).
This is the L-Z listing, "Lady Shiva" to "Victor Zsasz".

The write-ups are very detailed and make for good reading even if you don't use this in a supers game. If you are a fan of the DC Universe (mostly pre New 52) then this is a must have resource.
If you enjoy DCA/M&M3 then there are plenty of great ideas here. Highlights include Zatanna and a bunch of minion stats. There are also stats for the "Super Animals", cultists, undead and Demons. Also included, soldiers, robots, monsters, ninjas and animals.

There are some repeats from the Core book.

All in all a great purchase if you are a DC or M&M fan.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
DC ADVENTURES Heroes & Villains, Vol. 2
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DC ADVENTURES Heroes & Villains, Vol. I
Publisher: Green Ronin
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 09/10/2012 16:37:23
Vol 1 of the Heroes & Villain write-ups for the DC Adventures RPG (but it also works for M&M3).
This is the A-K listing, "Adam Strange" to "Kobra & The Kobra Cult".

The write-ups are very detailed and make for good reading even if you don't use this in a supers game. If you are a fan of the DC Universe (mostly pre New 52) then this is a must have resource.
If you enjoy DCA/M&M3 then there are plenty of great ideas here. Highlights include all the "Bat" family (except Robin and Nightwing, next book), Blue, Green and Indigo Lantern Corps., and even Tim Hunter. Oddly enough, Adam Strange is listed under "A", but John Constantine is under "C". There are some repeats from the Core book.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
DC ADVENTURES Heroes & Villains, Vol. I
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Active Exploits Diceless Roleplaying
Publisher: Precis Intermedia
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 08/28/2012 12:03:06
I am not a fan of diceless systems. I like the random element and the joy of rolling dice. For me diceless systems remove something that I consider to be part of the joy of RPGs.

That being said I am sold on Active Exploits. It is diceless and it weighs in at a whole 72 pages, it is a great game.
Any style, genre or scope of gaming can be covered in these very simple rules. It reminds me a bit of Fate.

What I like about this game is it truly seems to be universal. While the focus seems to be action, I could not think of anything you couldn't do with it. There is a assumption of modern games, doing fantasy or sci-fi might take a bit more work.

The mechanic is rather simple and would work great with the right players.

If you and your group are more into "Role" playing than "Roll" playing then you certainly can't go wrong with this.
I would also grab this as helpful guide on how to resolve action without always going to the dice. In this respect it is a great read for any gamer or game master.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Active Exploits Diceless Roleplaying
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THE SECRET FIRE Roleplaying Game Character Sheet
Publisher: Secret Fire Games
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 08/28/2012 06:31:14
See my larger review of the Secret Fire here: http://timbrannan.blogspot.com/2012/08/review-secret-fire.ht-
ml

The character sheet for this game is really awesome. Functional with some interesting art. I has the feel of D&D with Mage or Ars Magica added in.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
THE SECRET FIRE Roleplaying Game Character Sheet
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THE SECRET FIRE Roleplaying Game
Publisher: Secret Fire Games
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 08/28/2012 06:28:10
The Secret Fire came out to much hoopla and goings on last year.

I have always meant to review it, but never sat down to do it. Now, depending on my mood I go back and forth between this being a great homage to old-school play and even to Gygax himself to it being a fantasy heart-breaker with delusions of godhood. It will be interesting to see where I am by the end of this review.

Like I mentioned above The Secret Fire came out to much hoopla last year before Gen Con with this whole campaign blitz on how it was going to change role-playing and how it was going to be the biggest thing since D&D. I talked a bit about that around Gen Con back when it had changed it's name from Legends & Labyrinths to The Secret Fire. http://timbrannan.blogspot.com/2011/08/what-is-secret-fire.h-
tml

Of course give yourself some credit if you get the reference correct.

It didn't quite set the world on fire. Secret or otherwise.
But I can't blame the author, George R. Strayton (also the screenwriter for the Dragonlance animated movie and some episodes of Xena), for being excited. I would, and have, done the same.
One thing I am going to give the Secret Fire right now. It has style. The art is not fantastic and the formatting is a bit odd, but I enjoy looking at this book.

Forward and Introduction
Ok this part is cool, if maybe a touch corny. Learning to play D&D on Halloween 1979. Sure that sounds cool and I don't doubt it, but if that were true for me I might not say that because so many wouldn't believe. But that is not the point here. I know this, that kid learning to play D&D on Halloween would have loved the hell out of TSF. Oh. I gave the game a freebie now I need to take one away. Look I know this game is important to the author but reading THE SECRET FIRETM all the time is really annoying.
All that aside, I like this part. Why? Cause Strayton deep down is a kid that loves to play D&D and this is his 300+ page love letter to it. I like that he wants you play normal folk that could get killed, I like that he was "stuck with the dwarf" back then. If this is his mission statement then I am all aboard with it.

PART 1
Quotes from Gary Gygax are good. Quotes from Gail Gygax advertising your game, not so much. One more point given, one more taken away.
Part 1 is your typically "what is role-playing chapter but also some descriptions of what makes TSF different. I am torn on this one. While I like that this is not the kindergarten discussion on what is role-playing and what do you do, there also seems to be a lot back-patting here. TSF does this better and TSF does this... great, but tell me that in the game sections. BUT....I also often lament that we don't see enough of what makes Game X different than Game Y. If he makes good on these promises then we should be ok.

PART 2
Character creation. The classes, or callings, are pretty straightforward; cleric, warrior, thief and wizard. The big four really. They have some neat features. Levels only go to 10 and you know what, I kinda like that. The races are also the common four, Dwarf, Elf, Human and Halfling. I would have liked to see some more, but there are some neat twists to the races. Tables of what the races do, like Many Dwarfs...(roll a 1d20) and Some Dwarfs... (roll a 1d20), that is kinda cool really. Easily added to any sort of D&D-like game.
Instead of hitpoints we have wound levels, similar to some damage track systems I have seen. I like how damage effects movement and combat. Again, nothing revolutionary here, but still nice.
There is a random table of personality traits as well. I am sure would like this, but I prefer to figure out my character's personality in the playing, not the the rolling.

PART 3
This is the chapter on character Trademarks. They act like qualities/perks/drawbacks from other games. Interesting. Given the amount you can get I would have liked to have seen more, but this is a good list.

PART 4
Your weapons and equipment chapter.

PART 5
Energy Points are discussed here and are used to power "Special Effects". In a way they work a bit like Drama, Hero or Fate points. While like like these kinds of mechanics, they are not really "old-school" since they allow the player more control over the dice. While a plus in some respects I think the old-school purists will dislike it.

PARTS 6 & 7
Details the Elder Gods and prayers respectively. Prayers are of course the spells that Holy-men can use.

PART 8
Details the spells in the game. Like the Prayers, there are a lot of unique sounding names for some familiar looking spells. I like that. "Read Languages" sounds dull, but "Comprehend Texts (The Great Unknown)" sounds so much more...eldritch.

PART 9
Details the skills characters can have. The advice listed is that most time the character succeeding or failing should be obvious. This chapter should only aid in the cases where success is uncertain.
Skills are a roll-under mechanic compared to the necessary ability. The listed skills modify these dice rolls (3d6 to 7d6).

PART 10
Details adventuring. Not a bad chapter, but mostly narrative.

PART 11
This chapter details Engagements or what if typically called combat.

PART 12
Scenario Design. Lots of advice and random tables to stock your dungeons.

PART 13
Is monsters. The stat blocks look pretty familiar and would not be difficult at all to add to any other game.

PART 14
Treasure. What I liked most here was the creating Talismans. I have done talismans as well and they are a little different here than mine, but still fun. Like the spells there are a lot of unique items here. If you need to spice up your magic items, then this is a good place to start.

PART 15
Details the world. Not a lot of detail mind you, but enough to keep you busy.

PART 16
Deals with level advancement. How to do it, what to do about it and the like.

PART 17
Is an adventure, the Dungeons of Madness.

There are also a few Appencies, including a combat chart, links to the Gygax Memorial Fund, and a bit on why the game was made AND, interestingly enough, an alternate XP point award table to things the players can do outside of the game. I have done this with my kids to great effect.

The Appendix D, or suggested reading does come of as a bit pretentious. But...these are all in fact good books.

Bottom line
Again, this game didn't, and probably won't, set the world on fire. BUT there is a lot of cool things here that can be easily added to a D&D, S&W, ACKS or B/X Companion game.

It is easy to see what the author is trying to do here. I get it. I think the game though comes off a little like D&D Fate.

I will also add that TSF character sheet is one of the coolest ones I have seen. It, like the game, as a sense of style I really like. Another point in favor of this game, the website for the game is full of all sorts of goodies. http://www.secretfiregames.com/

I guess in the end I would give it 4 out of 5 stars and use it as a kick-ass resource. It is a good enough game by itself, but I plan on using it as an add-on.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
THE SECRET FIRE Roleplaying Game
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Legendary Levels II
Publisher: Little Red Goblin Games
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 08/10/2012 07:05:40
This book, like the first LL, deals with Pathfinder "Legendary" Levels, of levels 21 to 30. What 3.0/3.5 called Epic Levels. I think they picked "Legendary" as not to confuse it with D&D4. There is a Legendary Witch in this book, which is why I got it, but the rest is pretty good as well. In particular I liked the Legendary Samurai and the Dragon Lord prestige class. I Would have enjoyed seeing more prestige classes myself, but the book's focus was "Legendary classes" and note really prestige ones. Plenty of new feats and I REALLY liked the art in this book. So at the end of the day it was worth it to me.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Legendary Levels II
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Publisher Reply:
Hi Tim! Thanks for the review! You don't know how much it helps us to get a good review on a new product! If you'd like advanced copies of some of our stuff in the future we can probably work something out! (However we want an honest opinion- never something sugar coated :D ) Once again thank you so much! All the best, Scott Gladstein Producer Little Red Goblin Games LLC
Capes, Cowls and Villains Foul
Publisher: Spectrum Games
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 08/07/2012 07:38:48
Capes, Cowls and Villains Foul (CCaVF) is the eagerly anticipated supers/comic book emulation game from Spectrum Games. The same folks that gave Cartoon Action Hour.

I want to start off by saying that this is an attractive book. At 164 pages of full of color it feels like a comic. Since that is what the author aims to emulate I would say it so far is a success.

I think that is a good place to start. What is CCaVF? Well yes it is a supers game, but it is more a comic book emulation game. Meaning it tries to emulate the play-ability of reading a comic book. This sets it apart from the likes of other purely "Supers" games that might be trying to emulate how a super hero could exist in some sort of reality. Instead the assumption here is comic book reality. This would include things like editorial control or even breaking the 4th wall. Both of which are discussed later.

Chapter 0 is our Introduction which helps lay the ground work for what we will be reading. We are told that physics and logic often take a back seat to drama and excitement. So far I feeling that this will be closer to Marvel Heroic Roleplaying than say Villains and Vigilantes (both of which are great games for different styles of play). We are told that this game is about telling exciting stories with your friends. So far this sounds good. We are told next that this game uses the d12. I love that. The d12 is the oft forgotten die stuck between the mighty d20 and the diva that is the d10.
We also learn that CCaVF is a resource-based game. Now my experiences with resource based supers games has been mixed. So lets see what we have here.

Traits are match against other Traits with various Linked traits. Traits can be Primary or Secondary and after they are Used they become less effective. So someone like Superman would have a Primary Trait of Super-Strength with Secondary Traits of Flight and Heat Vision. Following the example in the book the Traits are bolded. Characters are likely to have 5 to 12 traits. Characters can also have Complications and Factoids. Sounds great! Let's get into the design!

Chapter 1 is Character Design. I like the term "Hero Design" myself, but that is cool. Your "Editor" (GM) will determine how many starting points your character will have. Much like the Power Points of M&M or other games. Except you are not buying the trait itself, you are buying what the trait represents. So a Signature Triat vs. a Secondary one or an Auto Defend. There is a handy chart with all the trait types and levels/ratings so you can add up your points quickly.
CCaVF encourages thinking about your character as a whole. So when making your Batman-clone you would not list all his martial arts but would just list Advanced Combat Training or something like that. Superman would have Super-Sonic Flight while the Carol Danvers Captain Marvel would have Hyper-Flight. So where are these traits listed? They are not. Yup. YOU define what the traits mean. So for example I define an Anamchara trait to go with my Willow & Tara characters. This is a Shared Trait, so the points are split up, but I define what it means and what it does. But don't worry the author gives you some ideas to work with.

The neatest thing though has to be the Editorial Control. These are like supercharged hero points or drama points. Editorial Control can be purchased with points, but is more expensive for more powerful characters. The Editor also gets a pool of EC points as well to use for the villains. There are also examples of various ways to regain EC points. Finally you fill out the character with factoids.
The chapter ends with an example of character creation. This is followed by a quick generation card to get you plying right away. Finally a listing of Heroes and Villains.

Chapter 2 is the Rules chapter.Typically rolls are a d12 some trait. Other times you might need to roll 2 d12s and keep the highest or even 3. The basic idea here is that the action needs to be like that in a comic book. So a bit of time is spent on combat. Now heroes and villains in CCaVF don't have hit points, but they do have Setbacks. Most of the chapter is dedicated to this this idea and some example difficulties are explored. All and all pretty easy.

Chapter 3 is all about Villains. Villains get special treatment in CCaVF. They are created with the same rules that give us heroes, but there is more to them than that. Given the treatment given them here, I think this should be must reading for any superhero RPG player/GM. Heroes are often defined by their villains or rogues gallery. This game did not forget that.

Chapter 4 deals with Options. Things you can do to tweak characters or games. One really nice thing is about how deal with super hero team-ups and what to do when some characters are more powerful than others. There is even a bit on killing (and why it should be avoided) and live action (LARP) supers.

Chapter 5 is a fairly comprehensive example of play. If you normally ignore these please read this one. Many of my questions were answered here. It is a good walk through of how to play the game.

Chapter 6 talks about Issues, or adventures for your new set of heroes and villains. Again there is a lot of good information here for Editors/GMs of any sort of supers game. In particular there is the all important Introductory Issue which brings the team the together. I could not help but think of the team of misfits in the new Justice League Dark while reading this. Fantasy RPG fans should also take note of this chapter since it helps get past that old "you all met in an inn before an adventure".

We end with an Afterword where the author discusses why he made this game. The Appendix has a great glossary, index and cheat sheets for the game.

All in all I am quite pleased with this game. I agree with the author in that I love Supers games, but it is hard to find that perfect game for your group. There have been some great choices that have come out in the last few years, but none are 100% perfect. CCaVF may not 100% perfect either, but it is really damn nice and has a lot of great things going for it.

You can read more here, http://timbrannan.blogspot.com/2012/08/capes-cowls-and-villa-
ins-foul.html
I will also have stated up characters.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Capes, Cowls and Villains Foul
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Space 1889: Red Sands
Publisher: Pinnacle Entertainment
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 08/06/2012 11:06:36
This is the Savage Worlds update to the classic Space 1899 series. Like it's fore-bearer this is a game where brave men and women from Earth brave the Ether to travel to a dying Mars or a Venus covered in lush jungles and dinosaurs. Based on the works of Burroughs and Verne this is a space travel game with a twist. There is plenty of room for adventure and the importunity to plant the flag of the British Empire on a new world or even find adventure of your own.
It is the Savage World rules and you need the core rules to play this. It is great fun and it is to date the best reason given to me to play Savage Worlds.
The only downside to this is that there is no conversion notes from the old Space 1899 to the new system. But that is minor compared to all the material you get here.

This is a great fun game and I hope I get to play some more of it.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Space 1889: Red Sands
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MARS: Savage Worlds Edition
Publisher: Adamant Entertainment
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 08/06/2012 10:55:00
Adamant Entertainment distilled some of the best features of the Planetary Romance/Sci-Fantasy genre into their Mars books. The lineage is obviously Edgar Rice Burroughs, with Green, Red and White (Ape) Martians. There is also a fair enough amount of H.G. Wells, but I have a hard time seeing this dying Mars invading Earth. As they advertise this is not the Mars of reality, this is the Mars that never was. This is Barsoom as it were. While not "John Carter of Mars the RPG" it can be played that way. There are even some surprises in the form of the Grey Men of Mars. Hint, they are not the "Greys" of later UFO mythology.

There are plenty of options for characters with an emphasis on high heroism and great feats. Imagine all the adventure of Victorian Times and the Pulp Era with the feel of a Space Opera in a D&D campaign then you get an idea of what Mars can do or be. This all reminds me a bit of the "Dying Earth" genre as well, since Mars is dying. Maybe that invasion of Earth is not too improbable after all.

I enjoyed this and really want to play a game on Mars now!
I rated this one a bit higher than the d20 version since I feel the fit with Savage Worlds is a bit better.
This is Savage Mars.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
MARS: Savage Worlds Edition
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MARS: The Roleplaying Game of Planetary Romance (d20 version)
Publisher: Adamant Entertainment
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 08/06/2012 10:54:10
Adamant Entertainment distilled some of the best features of the Planetary Romance/Sci-Fantasy genre into their Mars books. The lineage is obviously Edgar Rice Burroughs, with Green, Red and White (Ape) Martians. There is also a fair enough amount of H.G. Wells, but I have a hard time seeing this dying Mars invading Earth. As they advertise this is not the Mars of reality, this is the Mars that never was. This is Barsoom as it were. While not "John Carter of Mars the RPG" it can be played that way. There are even some surprises in the form of the Grey Men of Mars. Hint, they are not the "Greys" of later UFO mythology.

There are plenty of options for characters with an emphasis on high heroism and great feats. Imagine all the adventure of Victorian Times and the Pulp Era with the feel of a Space Opera in a D&D campaign then you get an idea of what Mars can do or be. This all reminds me a bit of the "Dying Earth" genre as well, since Mars is dying. Maybe that invasion of Earth is not too improbable after all.

I enjoyed this and really want to play a game on Mars now!

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
MARS: The Roleplaying Game of Planetary Romance (d20 version)
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Classic Fantasy Review: Volume 1, Issue 2
Publisher: Goblinoid Games
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 08/03/2012 15:41:09
This might be one of the first Old-School style witches that I purchased. In this supplement for OSRIC we get the Diabolical Witch. A witch that gains her powers and spells from the various demon and devil lords. Its a cross between a cleric and wizard, maybe with more emphasis on the cleric side of things. The level progression is closer to the cleric than the wizard to be honest. There are new spells, just a redistribution of current OSRIC spells. They get a number of special powers, some make sense (clerical turning and shapeshift) others not as much (limited thief abilities). A nice feature is how witches of different demon lords, devils get different powers.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Classic Fantasy Review: Volume 1, Issue 2
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Clipart Critters 220 - Live, Dead, Girls
Publisher: Postmortem Studios
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 07/26/2012 14:59:17
Zombie girl for publication or personal use.
Easy to understand attached license.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Clipart Critters 220 - Live, Dead, Girls
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