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The Flux Pay What You Want
Average Rating:4.8 / 5
Ratings Reviews Total
3 6
1 2
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The Flux
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The Flux
Publisher: John Wick Presents
by James C. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 06/26/2014 09:03:34
This is an amazing game, or should I say the glue for many different games. As one of the reviewers confessed, I to have gaming ADD and I own more games than I will ever play in my lifetime. I have always wanted to have a way to play the different games and settings without having to keep starting up new campaigns. This is a brilliant concept that will allow for some really cool Eternal Champion style play.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Flux
Publisher: John Wick Presents
by josh e. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 07/05/2011 20:37:38
To be blunt, I have Gamer ADD. As A GM I fear it has been a bane and a detriment to my players. They never get a sense of continuity, never get a chance to build their minions into powerful world figures, and never get the chance to spend more than a month or two tops with the same game.
Flux is the ruleset that I've been waiting for. It's a simple, elegant way to tie together several games in such a way that the players can actually look forward to playing more than one game, or switching between games rapidly.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Flux
Publisher: John Wick Presents
by Tim R. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 03/26/2011 15:00:18
I once wrote an adventure around Michael Moorcock's idea of the Eternal Champion. Heroes that existed through time, space, and dimensions. I planned it all in d20, keeping to a very specific storyline. The Flux makes that concept possible to translate across RPG system in addition to everything else. It's a spectacular method for turning short-form games into long-term epics. Hats off to you Mr. Wick. I can't wait to see what else you have in store.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Flux
Publisher: John Wick Presents
by Frank M. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 01/31/2011 05:59:26
"The Flux" expresses a simple but elegant idea: player characters live multiple lives, in multiple worlds, under multiple RPG systems. As someone who owns far too many games I've never played, it's a brilliant narrative device to justify putting away D&D/Vampire/whatever for a while and trying something different.

Past worlds disappear and others take their place, and the "soul" of a character (namely the player) reincarnates into a similar character under the new rules. Those old character sheets, however, still serve a purpose in a brave new world. Old worlds may return, and old lives pick up where they left off ... or not. More intriguingly, player character has a chance to remember an old life well enough to borrow its abilities, but in doing so risks the wrath of the current world.

Unfortunately, the GM may risk the wrath of his players, if (as the author suggests) he surprises them with a brand new world and brand new rules. As cool as the Flux is (as a concept), GMs need to know their players well enough, or need to have cowed them enough, that they'll go along.

For 14 pages of content $5 is a tad overpriced. The contents, however, do get the old brain-meats working.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
The Flux
Publisher: John Wick Presents
by Dave B. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 01/20/2011 11:17:07
The Flux is... Well, a bit of a let down... I mean I am a major ADD GM, much to my player’s dismay sometimes. I read the sales pitch, I had drank the Wick lemonade a long time ago to be honest, and thought that this will be a massive insight into how to tie together many games (systems) into a cohesive concept. It’s not, but it’s not a bad idea either though. Maybe I expected too much.

The Flux approach to handling the many systems and settings is to layer a meta-mechanic over top of them all. It is a light weight mechanic that DOES what is promised. With only 16 pages I am not sure it’s worth the price, it didn't feel as thoroughly explored as some of the other Wick writings. I think I would have liked it more with some more examples of how it works out, funnily in the book he says no one would want that, but I did.

I just wanted... needed more. I hope that that this gets more exploration in future products for the Big Book of Little Games

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
The Flux
Publisher: John Wick Presents
by Anthony C. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 01/08/2011 17:05:00
I've been looking forward to this book/chapter/what-have-you since John Wick offered a tease of it on his blog. Most omni-systems leave me cold because game A does something cool that game B cannot really replicate. Attempting to shoehorn all these systems into one generic system just mostly sucks (Savage Worlds may be an exception for me).

The difference with this product is twofold (1) it lets you keep your original rules to each game you want to utilize and (2) it lets you pull a truly great trick on your players. This is a small product (arounnd 20 pages), but well worth its cost.

If you're sitting on twenty plus years of gaming books like I am and worried you'll never play them all, The Flux has seriously offered some help towards shaking the dust off them.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Flux
Publisher: John Wick Presents
by Shane O. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 01/08/2011 15:16:22
Back in the day, I always wanted to come up with some set of rules or guidelines that would let me move my old D&D group across multiple campaign worlds. I still can’t tell you exactly why the thought of moving them from one world to another was so exciting, but it was. I never got around to it, and in all honesty the entire thing seemed to be more trouble than it was worth – after all, give the PCs ways to move between worlds and they’ll quickly start abusing it. So I shelved the idea and eventually forgot about it.

…until I saw John Wick’s The Flux. This short book, in less than twenty pages, not only rekindled my excitement for a campaign that moves between worlds, but expands the scope of those worlds dramatically, fixes the problems I was encountering, and adds some fun new rules to it all. Let’s take a closer look and see what The Flux is all about.

From a technical standpoint, The Flux presents itself very professionally. It has full, nested bookmarks, and leaves copy-and-pasting enabled. Further, it comes with the necessary formatting to read it on a Mac or as an ePub document. The book is entirely black and white, and save for an alternating page border of a chain and pendant, is devoid of illustrations. And yet, I liked the minimalist approach of its visual design. It really gives a sense that we’re looking at something innocuous, or even deliberately downplayed, which fits with the tone of the book – fluxing is portrayed as a secret only some people are aware of.

But what exactly is a “flux” and what does this book offer?

Described as a “meta-RPG,” The Flux introduces an in-game rationale for changing RPG systems and translating characters between them, as well as offering a few additional rules based around the idea that characters remember their previous incarnations from past games. For example, your character may be a wizard in D&D, but then there’s a flux and the GM pulls out Call of Cthulhu instead, and your character is now a private investigator…who remembers some of the D&D spells he knew before.

Fluxing is nominally described as what happens when the world “dies” and is instantly “reborn.” It’s a cool description for why this phenomenon happens, but I’m not sure how well that works as a concept considering that fluxes seem to happen fairly often (in the author’s examples and from the in-game writing) and because the author talks about cycling through the same select few game systems for fluxes.

But let’s go through the book piece by piece.

There’s a fairly strong piece of opening fiction where a character is describing fluxing to another character before we move on to the rules. The author keeps a very conversational writing style throughout the book, often referring to himself in the first person, which was more entertaining than I thought it’d be. There’s no chapters, but the book is broken down into a number of sections and subsections.

The Flux tells us that when a flux happens the Game Master translates the PCs into their new incarnations – that is, he literally makes the PCs’ stats for the new game system they’ve fluxed to. All PCs also use the new ability score presented here, Memory, which determines how many of their previous incarnations they recall and correspondingly how many changes they can make to their GM-written PCs.

I personally shook my head a little at this section. Character creation is one of the areas where the players have near-absolute, if not total, control over how things turn out. Having the GM write up their new characters while letting them make only a static number of alterations certainly made sense – in a new incarnation, you don’t get to choose who you’ll be – but I know that if I did this my players would likely rebel. Personally speaking, I’d invert this rule; I’d let the PCs write up their own new characters (with some guidelines about how powerful they should be apropos to the game system) and then the GM gets to make a number of changes equal to each PC’s Memory score.

Of course, your Memory isn’t a static number. You can, in fact, fail to remember who you were before a flux, though there is a way to be awakened to your previous selves’ memories. Likewise, your Memory score can be increased by certain things.

The major aspect of Memory, however, is what the next section of the book covers: that you remember your previous lives’ skills and abilities, and can try and use them in your current world – these are known as Recall. Like the private eye with the memories of a mage, you can have a character use those powers even if they don’t necessarily fit with the genre/game system you’re currently using. Of course, you might fail to translate that ability to your current world, and even if you do use it there’s no guarantee it’ll work the same (different world, different rules).

It should be noted that bringing in powers from the old world(s) isn’t something your characters get freely. The more they do this, the more likely they are for the world to notice that something’s happening that shouldn’t be. If the world does notice, then there’s Whiplash, where the world tries to deal with the problems that your character is causing. This usually ends badly for the character. And then there’s a brief note about Slippage; rarely, something more than just memories will make the transition to the new world…

Roughly the last third of the book is meant for Narrators; that is, people who run the game (e.g. Game Masters, etc.). This covers some of the basic questions about fluxing, along with presenting some ideas for how things could work in various fluxed worlds. Finally, we get the resolution to the opening fiction, which I quite enjoyed.

Ultimately, I found myself highly impressed with The Flux. The idea it presents is exciting and offers simple yet novel way of easily transitioning from game to game while keeping continuity for flux characters. The few rules it introduces are simple, yet serve to highlight what makes fluxing an addition to a game, rather than just an excuse to start using a different system. The remaining guidelines are helpful without being restrictive, letting you go your own way where you differ from the author’s presentation (as I did in a few places). Finally, the writing is top-notch, being all the more intriguing for its casual tone.

If you and your players want to transition game systems without having to start everything over, if you love the idea of characters and plotlines that span worlds, if you want to see a little more of one game take place in another, then pick up The Flux. New worlds are just a flux away.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Flux
Publisher: John Wick Presents
by erik f. t. t. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 01/03/2011 19:21:59
There aren't all that many RPG products that leave you standing there with your mouth open and at the same time wanting to smack yourself in the head. The Flux is one of those few.

Hello, my name is Erik, and I suffer from Gamer's ADD. No, not AD&D, but Gamer's Attention Deficit Disorder. There is just so much cool crap, i want to run from Labyrinth Lord, to Fate, to Dresden, to Swords & Wizardry, to Tunnels and Trolls - I want it all. As a GM, sometimes I get drawn to the new shiny like a moth to flame.

The Flux embraces my illness and makes it a strength. The solution is obvious really, run them all, yet keep them linked. John Wick is a smart man.

This isn't a long, wordy product, but a tool that may be eye opening and inspirational. I'm already toying with it, and I don't even have a campaign started with any system at the moment.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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